Limits...
Growth rate of early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic liver disease.

An C, Choi YA, Choi D, Paik YH, Ahn SH, Kim MJ, Paik SW, Han KH, Park MS - Clin Mol Hepatol (2015)

Bottom Line: The goal of this study was to estimate the growth rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and identify the host factors that significantly affect this rate.The median TVDT was 85.7 days, with a range of 11 to 851.2 days.The etiology of chronic liver disease is a host factor that may significantly affect the growth rate of early-stage HCC, since HBV-associated HCC grows faster than HCV-associated HCC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: The goal of this study was to estimate the growth rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and identify the host factors that significantly affect this rate.

Methods: Patients with early-stage HCC (n=175) who underwent two or more serial dynamic imaging studies without any anticancer treatment at two tertiary care hospitals in Korea were identified. For each patient, the tumor volume doubling time (TVDT) of HCC was calculated by comparing tumor volumes between serial imaging studies. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients.

Results: The median TVDT was 85.7 days, with a range of 11 to 851.2 days. Multiple linear regression revealed that the initial tumor diameter (a tumor factor) and the etiology of chronic liver disease (a host factor) were significantly associated with the TVDT. The TVDT was shorter when the initial tumor diameter was smaller, and was shorter in HCC related to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection than in HCC related to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (median, 76.8 days vs. 137.2 days; P=0.0234).

Conclusions: The etiology of chronic liver disease is a host factor that may significantly affect the growth rate of early-stage HCC, since HBV-associated HCC grows faster than HCV-associated HCC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatter plot and linear regression line for the relationship between the initial tumor diameter and the TVDT of HCC. TVDT, tumor volume doubling time; HCC, hepatocellular carcinoma.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612289&req=5

Figure 2: Scatter plot and linear regression line for the relationship between the initial tumor diameter and the TVDT of HCC. TVDT, tumor volume doubling time; HCC, hepatocellular carcinoma.

Mentions: The TVDT ranged from 11 to 851.2 days (mean ± SD, 127.6 ± 128.7; median, 85.7 days), and its geometric mean ± SD, computed by reverse-transforming the mean of the log-transformed values, was 91.4 ± 2.2. The univariate linear regression showed that a shorter TVDT was significantly associated with serum AFP ≥ 400 ng/mL (vs. <9 ng/mL), smaller initial tumor diameter, and HBV infection. In the multivariate analysis, virus type (HBV vs. HCV, P =0.0234) and initial tumor diameter (P =0.0204) were independently associated with TVDT (Table 2). None of the variables investigated showed a significant interaction with hospital, so a subgroup analysis by hospital was not performed. The TVDT was shortest among the patients infected with HBV (median [range], 76.8 [11-752.2] days), longest among those infected with HCV (median [range], 137.2 [22.4-851.2] days), and intermediate among those with no hepatitis virus infection (median [range], 99.8 [33.6-288.4] days). There was a significant difference in TVDT between the patients infected with HBV and those infected with HCV (P<0.001) but not between those with no hepatitis virus infection and those with either HBV or HCV infection (no virus vs. HBV, P =0.1226; no virus vs. HCV, P =0.2994; Fig. 1). There was a positive linear relationship between the log-transformed TVDT and the initial diameter of the HCC (R2=0.027; Fig. 2). The linear regression equations for the entire study cohort and the virus-type subgroups were as follows: for all patients, TVDT = exp (0.173 × diameter + 4.211); for patients with HBV, TVDT = exp (0.124 × diameter + 4.161); for patients with HCV, TVDT = exp (0.221 × diameter + 4.475); and for patients with no hepatitis virus, TVDT = exp (0.316 × diameter + 4.094).


Growth rate of early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic liver disease.

An C, Choi YA, Choi D, Paik YH, Ahn SH, Kim MJ, Paik SW, Han KH, Park MS - Clin Mol Hepatol (2015)

Scatter plot and linear regression line for the relationship between the initial tumor diameter and the TVDT of HCC. TVDT, tumor volume doubling time; HCC, hepatocellular carcinoma.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612289&req=5

Figure 2: Scatter plot and linear regression line for the relationship between the initial tumor diameter and the TVDT of HCC. TVDT, tumor volume doubling time; HCC, hepatocellular carcinoma.
Mentions: The TVDT ranged from 11 to 851.2 days (mean ± SD, 127.6 ± 128.7; median, 85.7 days), and its geometric mean ± SD, computed by reverse-transforming the mean of the log-transformed values, was 91.4 ± 2.2. The univariate linear regression showed that a shorter TVDT was significantly associated with serum AFP ≥ 400 ng/mL (vs. <9 ng/mL), smaller initial tumor diameter, and HBV infection. In the multivariate analysis, virus type (HBV vs. HCV, P =0.0234) and initial tumor diameter (P =0.0204) were independently associated with TVDT (Table 2). None of the variables investigated showed a significant interaction with hospital, so a subgroup analysis by hospital was not performed. The TVDT was shortest among the patients infected with HBV (median [range], 76.8 [11-752.2] days), longest among those infected with HCV (median [range], 137.2 [22.4-851.2] days), and intermediate among those with no hepatitis virus infection (median [range], 99.8 [33.6-288.4] days). There was a significant difference in TVDT between the patients infected with HBV and those infected with HCV (P<0.001) but not between those with no hepatitis virus infection and those with either HBV or HCV infection (no virus vs. HBV, P =0.1226; no virus vs. HCV, P =0.2994; Fig. 1). There was a positive linear relationship between the log-transformed TVDT and the initial diameter of the HCC (R2=0.027; Fig. 2). The linear regression equations for the entire study cohort and the virus-type subgroups were as follows: for all patients, TVDT = exp (0.173 × diameter + 4.211); for patients with HBV, TVDT = exp (0.124 × diameter + 4.161); for patients with HCV, TVDT = exp (0.221 × diameter + 4.475); and for patients with no hepatitis virus, TVDT = exp (0.316 × diameter + 4.094).

Bottom Line: The goal of this study was to estimate the growth rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and identify the host factors that significantly affect this rate.The median TVDT was 85.7 days, with a range of 11 to 851.2 days.The etiology of chronic liver disease is a host factor that may significantly affect the growth rate of early-stage HCC, since HBV-associated HCC grows faster than HCV-associated HCC.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: The goal of this study was to estimate the growth rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and identify the host factors that significantly affect this rate.

Methods: Patients with early-stage HCC (n=175) who underwent two or more serial dynamic imaging studies without any anticancer treatment at two tertiary care hospitals in Korea were identified. For each patient, the tumor volume doubling time (TVDT) of HCC was calculated by comparing tumor volumes between serial imaging studies. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients.

Results: The median TVDT was 85.7 days, with a range of 11 to 851.2 days. Multiple linear regression revealed that the initial tumor diameter (a tumor factor) and the etiology of chronic liver disease (a host factor) were significantly associated with the TVDT. The TVDT was shorter when the initial tumor diameter was smaller, and was shorter in HCC related to hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection than in HCC related to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (median, 76.8 days vs. 137.2 days; P=0.0234).

Conclusions: The etiology of chronic liver disease is a host factor that may significantly affect the growth rate of early-stage HCC, since HBV-associated HCC grows faster than HCV-associated HCC.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus