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High incidence and increasing prevalence of multiple sclerosis in British Columbia, Canada: findings from over two decades (1991-2010).

Kingwell E, Zhu F, Marrie RA, Fisk JD, Wolfson C, Warren S, Profetto-McGrath J, Svenson LW, Jette N, Bhan V, Yu BN, Elliott L, Tremlett H - J. Neurol. (2015)

Bottom Line: The incidence rate was stable [average: 7.8/100,000 (95 % CI 7.6, 8.1)], while the female: male ratio decreased (p = 0.045) but remained at or above 2 for all years (average 2.8:1).Neither the incidence nor the incidence sex ratio increased over time.However, the prevalence and prevalence sex ratio increased significantly during the 18-year period, which may be explained by the increased peak prevalence age of MS, longer survival with MS and the greater life expectancy of women compared to men.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine (Neurology), UBC Hospital, University of British Columbia, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5, Canada. elainejk@mail.ubc.ca.

ABSTRACT
Province-wide population-based administrative health data from British Columbia (BC), Canada (population: approximately 4.5 million) were used to estimate the incidence and prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) and examine potential trends over time. All BC residents meeting validated health administrative case definitions for MS were identified using hospital, physician, death, and health registration files. Estimates of annual prevalence (1991-2008), and incidence (1996-2008; allowing a 5-year disease-free run-in period) were age and sex standardized to the 2001 Canadian population. Changes over time in incidence, prevalence and sex ratios were examined using Poisson and log-binomial regression. The incidence rate was stable [average: 7.8/100,000 (95 % CI 7.6, 8.1)], while the female: male ratio decreased (p = 0.045) but remained at or above 2 for all years (average 2.8:1). From 1991-2008, MS prevalence increased by 4.7 % on average per year (p < 0.001) from 78.8/100,000 (95 % CI 75.7, 82.0) to 179.9/100,000 (95 % CI 176.0, 183.8), the sex prevalence ratio increased from 2.27 to 2.78 (p < 0.001) and the peak prevalence age range increased from 45-49 to 55-59 years. MS incidence and prevalence in BC are among the highest in the world. Neither the incidence nor the incidence sex ratio increased over time. However, the prevalence and prevalence sex ratio increased significantly during the 18-year period, which may be explained by the increased peak prevalence age of MS, longer survival with MS and the greater life expectancy of women compared to men.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Age-standardized prevalence (1991–2008) of multiple sclerosis cases identified by the primary case definition (a) and the more sensitive but less specific case definition (b) in British Columbia, Canada
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Fig2: Age-standardized prevalence (1991–2008) of multiple sclerosis cases identified by the primary case definition (a) and the more sensitive but less specific case definition (b) in British Columbia, Canada

Mentions: The prevalence of MS increased over the 18-year observation period by an average of 4.7 % per year (p < 0.001), and the sex prevalence ratio increased from 2.27 in 1991 to 2.78 in 2008 (p < 0.001) (Fig. 2a, b). Overall, the peak age of prevalent MS cases increased over time from 45–49 years in the early 1990s to 55–59 years in 2008 (Fig. 3).Fig. 2


High incidence and increasing prevalence of multiple sclerosis in British Columbia, Canada: findings from over two decades (1991-2010).

Kingwell E, Zhu F, Marrie RA, Fisk JD, Wolfson C, Warren S, Profetto-McGrath J, Svenson LW, Jette N, Bhan V, Yu BN, Elliott L, Tremlett H - J. Neurol. (2015)

Age-standardized prevalence (1991–2008) of multiple sclerosis cases identified by the primary case definition (a) and the more sensitive but less specific case definition (b) in British Columbia, Canada
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608995&req=5

Fig2: Age-standardized prevalence (1991–2008) of multiple sclerosis cases identified by the primary case definition (a) and the more sensitive but less specific case definition (b) in British Columbia, Canada
Mentions: The prevalence of MS increased over the 18-year observation period by an average of 4.7 % per year (p < 0.001), and the sex prevalence ratio increased from 2.27 in 1991 to 2.78 in 2008 (p < 0.001) (Fig. 2a, b). Overall, the peak age of prevalent MS cases increased over time from 45–49 years in the early 1990s to 55–59 years in 2008 (Fig. 3).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: The incidence rate was stable [average: 7.8/100,000 (95 % CI 7.6, 8.1)], while the female: male ratio decreased (p = 0.045) but remained at or above 2 for all years (average 2.8:1).Neither the incidence nor the incidence sex ratio increased over time.However, the prevalence and prevalence sex ratio increased significantly during the 18-year period, which may be explained by the increased peak prevalence age of MS, longer survival with MS and the greater life expectancy of women compared to men.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Medicine (Neurology), UBC Hospital, University of British Columbia, 2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2B5, Canada. elainejk@mail.ubc.ca.

ABSTRACT
Province-wide population-based administrative health data from British Columbia (BC), Canada (population: approximately 4.5 million) were used to estimate the incidence and prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) and examine potential trends over time. All BC residents meeting validated health administrative case definitions for MS were identified using hospital, physician, death, and health registration files. Estimates of annual prevalence (1991-2008), and incidence (1996-2008; allowing a 5-year disease-free run-in period) were age and sex standardized to the 2001 Canadian population. Changes over time in incidence, prevalence and sex ratios were examined using Poisson and log-binomial regression. The incidence rate was stable [average: 7.8/100,000 (95 % CI 7.6, 8.1)], while the female: male ratio decreased (p = 0.045) but remained at or above 2 for all years (average 2.8:1). From 1991-2008, MS prevalence increased by 4.7 % on average per year (p < 0.001) from 78.8/100,000 (95 % CI 75.7, 82.0) to 179.9/100,000 (95 % CI 176.0, 183.8), the sex prevalence ratio increased from 2.27 to 2.78 (p < 0.001) and the peak prevalence age range increased from 45-49 to 55-59 years. MS incidence and prevalence in BC are among the highest in the world. Neither the incidence nor the incidence sex ratio increased over time. However, the prevalence and prevalence sex ratio increased significantly during the 18-year period, which may be explained by the increased peak prevalence age of MS, longer survival with MS and the greater life expectancy of women compared to men.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus