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Synthesis of Quercetin Loaded Nanoparticles Based on Alginate for Pb(II) Adsorption in Aqueous Solution.

Qi Y, Jiang M, Cui YL, Zhao L, Zhou X - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Bottom Line: Characterization of AN and Q-AN were analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TG-DTG-DSC).AN and Q-AN, with a diameter of 95.06 and 58.23 nm, were constituted by many small primary nanoparticles.AN and Q-AN would probably be applied as adsorbents to remove Pb(II) and then recover it from wastewater for the advantages of simple preparation, high adsorption capacity, and recyclability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, No. 92, Weijin Rd., Nankai District, Tianjin, 300072, China. qiyun@tju.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Pb(II) is a representative heavy metal in industrial wastewater, which may frequently cause serious hazard to living organisms. In this study, comparative studies between alginate nanoparticles (AN) and quercetin-decorated alginate nanoparticles (Q-AN) were investigated for Pb(II) ion adsorption. Characterization of AN and Q-AN were analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TG-DTG-DSC). The main operating conditions such as pH, initial concentration of Pb(II), and co-existing metal ions were also investigated using a batch experiment. AN and Q-AN, with a diameter of 95.06 and 58.23 nm, were constituted by many small primary nanoparticles. It revealed that when initial concentration of Pb(II) is between 250 and 1250 mg L(-1), the adsorption rate and equilibrium adsorption were increased with the increase of pH from 2 to 7. The maximum adsorption capacities of 147.02 and 140.37 mg L(-1) were achieved by AN and Q-AN, respectively, with 0.2 g adsorbents in 1000 mg L(-1) Pb(II) at pH 7. The adsorption rate of Pb(II) was little influenced by the co-existing metal ions, such as Mn(II), Co(II), and Cd(II). Desorption experiments showed that Q-AN possessed a higher desorption rate than AN, which were 90.07 and 83.26 %, respectively. AN and Q-AN would probably be applied as adsorbents to remove Pb(II) and then recover it from wastewater for the advantages of simple preparation, high adsorption capacity, and recyclability.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The effect of co-existing metal on the adsorption of Pb(II). The initial concentrations of Pb(II) and co-existing metal were 500 and 100 mg L−1, respectively. The initial pH was 7
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Fig6: The effect of co-existing metal on the adsorption of Pb(II). The initial concentrations of Pb(II) and co-existing metal were 500 and 100 mg L−1, respectively. The initial pH was 7

Mentions: Co-existing metal might compete with Pb(II) for the adsorption sites on the adsorbents; thus, three typical heavy metals, Mn, Co, and Cd, were added into the reaction solution to estimate their effects on Pb(II) adsorption. As shown in Fig. 6, the presence of examined metals with a concentration of 100 mg L−1 only caused a 10–20 mg L−1 decrease in removal rate of Pb(II). In Fig. 7, about 20–40 mg L−1 decrease of the co-existing metals was observed. In the presence of a single metal, a 80.10–85.66 % absorption rate was achieved by both AN and Q-AN. However, when Mn(II), Co(II), and Cd(II) were co-existing, the AN group got an absorption rate of 77.86 %, which was 2.29 % lower than that in the Q-AN group. Generally, the results illustrated that both the AN and Q-AN were effective adsorbents for Pb(II) in aqueous solution, and the presence of abovementioned ions had slight impact on Pb(II) adsorption [11, 23].Fig. 6


Synthesis of Quercetin Loaded Nanoparticles Based on Alginate for Pb(II) Adsorption in Aqueous Solution.

Qi Y, Jiang M, Cui YL, Zhao L, Zhou X - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

The effect of co-existing metal on the adsorption of Pb(II). The initial concentrations of Pb(II) and co-existing metal were 500 and 100 mg L−1, respectively. The initial pH was 7
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608953&req=5

Fig6: The effect of co-existing metal on the adsorption of Pb(II). The initial concentrations of Pb(II) and co-existing metal were 500 and 100 mg L−1, respectively. The initial pH was 7
Mentions: Co-existing metal might compete with Pb(II) for the adsorption sites on the adsorbents; thus, three typical heavy metals, Mn, Co, and Cd, were added into the reaction solution to estimate their effects on Pb(II) adsorption. As shown in Fig. 6, the presence of examined metals with a concentration of 100 mg L−1 only caused a 10–20 mg L−1 decrease in removal rate of Pb(II). In Fig. 7, about 20–40 mg L−1 decrease of the co-existing metals was observed. In the presence of a single metal, a 80.10–85.66 % absorption rate was achieved by both AN and Q-AN. However, when Mn(II), Co(II), and Cd(II) were co-existing, the AN group got an absorption rate of 77.86 %, which was 2.29 % lower than that in the Q-AN group. Generally, the results illustrated that both the AN and Q-AN were effective adsorbents for Pb(II) in aqueous solution, and the presence of abovementioned ions had slight impact on Pb(II) adsorption [11, 23].Fig. 6

Bottom Line: Characterization of AN and Q-AN were analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TG-DTG-DSC).AN and Q-AN, with a diameter of 95.06 and 58.23 nm, were constituted by many small primary nanoparticles.AN and Q-AN would probably be applied as adsorbents to remove Pb(II) and then recover it from wastewater for the advantages of simple preparation, high adsorption capacity, and recyclability.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, No. 92, Weijin Rd., Nankai District, Tianjin, 300072, China. qiyun@tju.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT
Pb(II) is a representative heavy metal in industrial wastewater, which may frequently cause serious hazard to living organisms. In this study, comparative studies between alginate nanoparticles (AN) and quercetin-decorated alginate nanoparticles (Q-AN) were investigated for Pb(II) ion adsorption. Characterization of AN and Q-AN were analysed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TG-DTG-DSC). The main operating conditions such as pH, initial concentration of Pb(II), and co-existing metal ions were also investigated using a batch experiment. AN and Q-AN, with a diameter of 95.06 and 58.23 nm, were constituted by many small primary nanoparticles. It revealed that when initial concentration of Pb(II) is between 250 and 1250 mg L(-1), the adsorption rate and equilibrium adsorption were increased with the increase of pH from 2 to 7. The maximum adsorption capacities of 147.02 and 140.37 mg L(-1) were achieved by AN and Q-AN, respectively, with 0.2 g adsorbents in 1000 mg L(-1) Pb(II) at pH 7. The adsorption rate of Pb(II) was little influenced by the co-existing metal ions, such as Mn(II), Co(II), and Cd(II). Desorption experiments showed that Q-AN possessed a higher desorption rate than AN, which were 90.07 and 83.26 %, respectively. AN and Q-AN would probably be applied as adsorbents to remove Pb(II) and then recover it from wastewater for the advantages of simple preparation, high adsorption capacity, and recyclability.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus