Limits...
In situ prebiotics: enzymatic release of galacto-rhamnogalacturonan from potato pulp in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract of the weaning piglet.

Strube ML, Jensen TK, Meyer AS, Boye M - AMB Express (2015)

Bottom Line: Using purified prebiotics may however not be cost-effective in the livestock production industry.Instead, prebiotic fibres may be released directly in the gastro-intestinal tract by feeding enzymes with a suitable substrate and allowing the prebiotics to be produced in situ.To our knowledge, this is the first paper describing targeted production of prebiotics in an animal model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksberg, Denmark. milst@vet.dtu.dk.

ABSTRACT
Prebiotics may be efficient for prevention of intestinal infections in humans and animals by increasing the levels of beneficial bacteria and thereby improving gut health. Using purified prebiotics may however not be cost-effective in the livestock production industry. Instead, prebiotic fibres may be released directly in the gastro-intestinal tract by feeding enzymes with a suitable substrate and allowing the prebiotics to be produced in situ. Using low doses, 0.03 % enzyme-to-substrate ratio, of the enzymes pectin lyase and polygalacturonase in combination with potato pulp, a low-value industrial by-product, we show that high molecular weight galacto-rhamnogalacturonan can be solubilized in the stomach of weaning piglets. The release of this fiber is in the order of 22-38 % of the theoretical amount, achieved within 20 min. The catalysis takes place mainly in the stomach of the animal and is then followed by distribution through the small intestines. To our knowledge, this is the first paper describing targeted production of prebiotics in an animal model.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Released CH100 with PG, PL or both in combination in an in vitro reactor emulating stomach conditions, e.g. pH 2 and pepsin at 0.32 mg/mL. Values are scaled to the same mass of initial substrate as in the in vivo data to allow for direct comparison. Lines were fitted with a Monod equation. The vertical line corresponds to the average of CH100 in the entire gastrointestinal tract of the enzyme-treated animals. CH100 carbohydrate with a molecular mass larger than 100 kDa, PG polygalacturonase, PL pectin lyase
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608949&req=5

Fig3: Released CH100 with PG, PL or both in combination in an in vitro reactor emulating stomach conditions, e.g. pH 2 and pepsin at 0.32 mg/mL. Values are scaled to the same mass of initial substrate as in the in vivo data to allow for direct comparison. Lines were fitted with a Monod equation. The vertical line corresponds to the average of CH100 in the entire gastrointestinal tract of the enzyme-treated animals. CH100 carbohydrate with a molecular mass larger than 100 kDa, PG polygalacturonase, PL pectin lyase

Mentions: To test the hypothesis that the majority of GRG-release is achieved rapidly in the stomach conditions, the release of GRG in a simulated stomach with low pH and pepsin was investigated (Fig. 3). Very little CH100 was released when no enzyme was added. With PL added, a small increase in release was observed, up to 20 mg after 180 min. When PG was added, however, 10 mg was released within 5 min, and almost 80 mg was released after 180 min. The combination of PG and PL was comparable to only PG, but resulted in a release of 100 mg at 180 min. The release appears to be facilitated by PG-activity and the mass of the released carbohydrate is comparable to what was observed in vivo.Fig. 3


In situ prebiotics: enzymatic release of galacto-rhamnogalacturonan from potato pulp in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract of the weaning piglet.

Strube ML, Jensen TK, Meyer AS, Boye M - AMB Express (2015)

Released CH100 with PG, PL or both in combination in an in vitro reactor emulating stomach conditions, e.g. pH 2 and pepsin at 0.32 mg/mL. Values are scaled to the same mass of initial substrate as in the in vivo data to allow for direct comparison. Lines were fitted with a Monod equation. The vertical line corresponds to the average of CH100 in the entire gastrointestinal tract of the enzyme-treated animals. CH100 carbohydrate with a molecular mass larger than 100 kDa, PG polygalacturonase, PL pectin lyase
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608949&req=5

Fig3: Released CH100 with PG, PL or both in combination in an in vitro reactor emulating stomach conditions, e.g. pH 2 and pepsin at 0.32 mg/mL. Values are scaled to the same mass of initial substrate as in the in vivo data to allow for direct comparison. Lines were fitted with a Monod equation. The vertical line corresponds to the average of CH100 in the entire gastrointestinal tract of the enzyme-treated animals. CH100 carbohydrate with a molecular mass larger than 100 kDa, PG polygalacturonase, PL pectin lyase
Mentions: To test the hypothesis that the majority of GRG-release is achieved rapidly in the stomach conditions, the release of GRG in a simulated stomach with low pH and pepsin was investigated (Fig. 3). Very little CH100 was released when no enzyme was added. With PL added, a small increase in release was observed, up to 20 mg after 180 min. When PG was added, however, 10 mg was released within 5 min, and almost 80 mg was released after 180 min. The combination of PG and PL was comparable to only PG, but resulted in a release of 100 mg at 180 min. The release appears to be facilitated by PG-activity and the mass of the released carbohydrate is comparable to what was observed in vivo.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Using purified prebiotics may however not be cost-effective in the livestock production industry.Instead, prebiotic fibres may be released directly in the gastro-intestinal tract by feeding enzymes with a suitable substrate and allowing the prebiotics to be produced in situ.To our knowledge, this is the first paper describing targeted production of prebiotics in an animal model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksberg, Denmark. milst@vet.dtu.dk.

ABSTRACT
Prebiotics may be efficient for prevention of intestinal infections in humans and animals by increasing the levels of beneficial bacteria and thereby improving gut health. Using purified prebiotics may however not be cost-effective in the livestock production industry. Instead, prebiotic fibres may be released directly in the gastro-intestinal tract by feeding enzymes with a suitable substrate and allowing the prebiotics to be produced in situ. Using low doses, 0.03 % enzyme-to-substrate ratio, of the enzymes pectin lyase and polygalacturonase in combination with potato pulp, a low-value industrial by-product, we show that high molecular weight galacto-rhamnogalacturonan can be solubilized in the stomach of weaning piglets. The release of this fiber is in the order of 22-38 % of the theoretical amount, achieved within 20 min. The catalysis takes place mainly in the stomach of the animal and is then followed by distribution through the small intestines. To our knowledge, this is the first paper describing targeted production of prebiotics in an animal model.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus