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In situ prebiotics: enzymatic release of galacto-rhamnogalacturonan from potato pulp in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract of the weaning piglet.

Strube ML, Jensen TK, Meyer AS, Boye M - AMB Express (2015)

Bottom Line: Using purified prebiotics may however not be cost-effective in the livestock production industry.Instead, prebiotic fibres may be released directly in the gastro-intestinal tract by feeding enzymes with a suitable substrate and allowing the prebiotics to be produced in situ.To our knowledge, this is the first paper describing targeted production of prebiotics in an animal model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksberg, Denmark. milst@vet.dtu.dk.

ABSTRACT
Prebiotics may be efficient for prevention of intestinal infections in humans and animals by increasing the levels of beneficial bacteria and thereby improving gut health. Using purified prebiotics may however not be cost-effective in the livestock production industry. Instead, prebiotic fibres may be released directly in the gastro-intestinal tract by feeding enzymes with a suitable substrate and allowing the prebiotics to be produced in situ. Using low doses, 0.03 % enzyme-to-substrate ratio, of the enzymes pectin lyase and polygalacturonase in combination with potato pulp, a low-value industrial by-product, we show that high molecular weight galacto-rhamnogalacturonan can be solubilized in the stomach of weaning piglets. The release of this fiber is in the order of 22-38 % of the theoretical amount, achieved within 20 min. The catalysis takes place mainly in the stomach of the animal and is then followed by distribution through the small intestines. To our knowledge, this is the first paper describing targeted production of prebiotics in an animal model.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The cumulative amount of solubilized rhamnose, galacturonic acid, galactose and CH100 when summed across all sections of the gastrointestinal tract at each time point, for both enzyme- and control-treated animals. Vertical lines are intercepts in the associated linear model. Values are mean ± SEM. On the right axis, the mass relative to the theoretically maximal amount is depicted. CH100 carbohydrate with a molecular mass larger than 100 kDa
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Fig2: The cumulative amount of solubilized rhamnose, galacturonic acid, galactose and CH100 when summed across all sections of the gastrointestinal tract at each time point, for both enzyme- and control-treated animals. Vertical lines are intercepts in the associated linear model. Values are mean ± SEM. On the right axis, the mass relative to the theoretically maximal amount is depicted. CH100 carbohydrate with a molecular mass larger than 100 kDa

Mentions: When summed over all four sections in each animal, incubation time was not associated with a higher release of rhamnose, galacturonic acid, galactose or CH100 (p value for slope > 0.05) as seen in Fig. 2. There was however a highly significant effect of enzyme addition in general (p < 0.05). The total solubilization of GRG was between 22 and 38 % judging by the release of rhamnose and galacturonic acid, respectively, relative to the theoretical maximum amount. The lack of a time dependency may suggest that the reaction has progressed to completion within the initial 20 min and the GRG is only being distributed through the GIT beyond this. A certain microbial digestion of GRG from e.g. galactanases or RG-1 lyases produced by native bacteria in the ileum is also possible.Fig. 2


In situ prebiotics: enzymatic release of galacto-rhamnogalacturonan from potato pulp in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract of the weaning piglet.

Strube ML, Jensen TK, Meyer AS, Boye M - AMB Express (2015)

The cumulative amount of solubilized rhamnose, galacturonic acid, galactose and CH100 when summed across all sections of the gastrointestinal tract at each time point, for both enzyme- and control-treated animals. Vertical lines are intercepts in the associated linear model. Values are mean ± SEM. On the right axis, the mass relative to the theoretically maximal amount is depicted. CH100 carbohydrate with a molecular mass larger than 100 kDa
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608949&req=5

Fig2: The cumulative amount of solubilized rhamnose, galacturonic acid, galactose and CH100 when summed across all sections of the gastrointestinal tract at each time point, for both enzyme- and control-treated animals. Vertical lines are intercepts in the associated linear model. Values are mean ± SEM. On the right axis, the mass relative to the theoretically maximal amount is depicted. CH100 carbohydrate with a molecular mass larger than 100 kDa
Mentions: When summed over all four sections in each animal, incubation time was not associated with a higher release of rhamnose, galacturonic acid, galactose or CH100 (p value for slope > 0.05) as seen in Fig. 2. There was however a highly significant effect of enzyme addition in general (p < 0.05). The total solubilization of GRG was between 22 and 38 % judging by the release of rhamnose and galacturonic acid, respectively, relative to the theoretical maximum amount. The lack of a time dependency may suggest that the reaction has progressed to completion within the initial 20 min and the GRG is only being distributed through the GIT beyond this. A certain microbial digestion of GRG from e.g. galactanases or RG-1 lyases produced by native bacteria in the ileum is also possible.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Using purified prebiotics may however not be cost-effective in the livestock production industry.Instead, prebiotic fibres may be released directly in the gastro-intestinal tract by feeding enzymes with a suitable substrate and allowing the prebiotics to be produced in situ.To our knowledge, this is the first paper describing targeted production of prebiotics in an animal model.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksberg, Denmark. milst@vet.dtu.dk.

ABSTRACT
Prebiotics may be efficient for prevention of intestinal infections in humans and animals by increasing the levels of beneficial bacteria and thereby improving gut health. Using purified prebiotics may however not be cost-effective in the livestock production industry. Instead, prebiotic fibres may be released directly in the gastro-intestinal tract by feeding enzymes with a suitable substrate and allowing the prebiotics to be produced in situ. Using low doses, 0.03 % enzyme-to-substrate ratio, of the enzymes pectin lyase and polygalacturonase in combination with potato pulp, a low-value industrial by-product, we show that high molecular weight galacto-rhamnogalacturonan can be solubilized in the stomach of weaning piglets. The release of this fiber is in the order of 22-38 % of the theoretical amount, achieved within 20 min. The catalysis takes place mainly in the stomach of the animal and is then followed by distribution through the small intestines. To our knowledge, this is the first paper describing targeted production of prebiotics in an animal model.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus