Limits...
Re-examining sleep׳s effect on motor skills: How to access performance on the finger tapping task?

Ribeiro Pereira SI, Beijamini F, Vincenzi RA, Louzada FM - Sleep Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: By introducing a slight modification in the formula used to calculate the offline gains we were able to refine the estimated magnitude of sleep׳s effect on motor skills.The raw value of improvement after a nap decreased after this correction (from ~15% to ~5%), but remained significantly higher than the control.These results suggest that sleep does indeed play a role in motor skill consolidation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Here our goal was to determine the magnitude of sleep-related motor skill enhancement. Performance on the finger tapping task (FTT) was evaluated after a 90 min daytime nap (n=15) or after quiet wakefulness (n=15). By introducing a slight modification in the formula used to calculate the offline gains we were able to refine the estimated magnitude of sleep׳s effect on motor skills. The raw value of improvement after a nap decreased after this correction (from ~15% to ~5%), but remained significantly higher than the control. These results suggest that sleep does indeed play a role in motor skill consolidation.

No MeSH data available.


Offline improvement on the FFT of the nap and wake groups, calculated with the conventional formula (A) and with our proposed modified formula (B) (reported p-values refer to unpaired t test); comparison of the OI (%) within the nap group (C) and the wake control (D) (reported p-values refer to paired t-tests).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608897&req=5

f0010: Offline improvement on the FFT of the nap and wake groups, calculated with the conventional formula (A) and with our proposed modified formula (B) (reported p-values refer to unpaired t test); comparison of the OI (%) within the nap group (C) and the wake control (D) (reported p-values refer to paired t-tests).

Mentions: As for the offline improvement, when the conventional formula was used, a 14.86 (3.2)% improvement was depicted in the nap group and a 7.0 (3.4)% in the wake control. No difference between groups was found (p=0.104) (Fig. 2A). On the other hand, when the unrelated sources of variance were attenuated, (i.e., by using the ‘3 best’ formula) a 6.9 (2.8)% improvement was still detected in the nap group, while the wake control exhibited a 2.3 (2.2)% decrease in speed. In this case, the nap group significantly outperformed the wake control (p=0.016) (Fig. 2B). The offline gains in the nap group decreased significantly when the formula was adjusted to account for unrelated sources of variance (nap 3 last vs. nap 3 best), but an improvement in performance was still detected (p=0.002) (Fig. 2C). A significant decrease in performance was also detected in the wake controls (wake 3 last vs. wake 3 best); however, after the correction this group no longer presented an improvement, but rather a worsening of performance (p=0.008) (Fig. 2D).


Re-examining sleep׳s effect on motor skills: How to access performance on the finger tapping task?

Ribeiro Pereira SI, Beijamini F, Vincenzi RA, Louzada FM - Sleep Sci (2015)

Offline improvement on the FFT of the nap and wake groups, calculated with the conventional formula (A) and with our proposed modified formula (B) (reported p-values refer to unpaired t test); comparison of the OI (%) within the nap group (C) and the wake control (D) (reported p-values refer to paired t-tests).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608897&req=5

f0010: Offline improvement on the FFT of the nap and wake groups, calculated with the conventional formula (A) and with our proposed modified formula (B) (reported p-values refer to unpaired t test); comparison of the OI (%) within the nap group (C) and the wake control (D) (reported p-values refer to paired t-tests).
Mentions: As for the offline improvement, when the conventional formula was used, a 14.86 (3.2)% improvement was depicted in the nap group and a 7.0 (3.4)% in the wake control. No difference between groups was found (p=0.104) (Fig. 2A). On the other hand, when the unrelated sources of variance were attenuated, (i.e., by using the ‘3 best’ formula) a 6.9 (2.8)% improvement was still detected in the nap group, while the wake control exhibited a 2.3 (2.2)% decrease in speed. In this case, the nap group significantly outperformed the wake control (p=0.016) (Fig. 2B). The offline gains in the nap group decreased significantly when the formula was adjusted to account for unrelated sources of variance (nap 3 last vs. nap 3 best), but an improvement in performance was still detected (p=0.002) (Fig. 2C). A significant decrease in performance was also detected in the wake controls (wake 3 last vs. wake 3 best); however, after the correction this group no longer presented an improvement, but rather a worsening of performance (p=0.008) (Fig. 2D).

Bottom Line: By introducing a slight modification in the formula used to calculate the offline gains we were able to refine the estimated magnitude of sleep׳s effect on motor skills.The raw value of improvement after a nap decreased after this correction (from ~15% to ~5%), but remained significantly higher than the control.These results suggest that sleep does indeed play a role in motor skill consolidation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Here our goal was to determine the magnitude of sleep-related motor skill enhancement. Performance on the finger tapping task (FTT) was evaluated after a 90 min daytime nap (n=15) or after quiet wakefulness (n=15). By introducing a slight modification in the formula used to calculate the offline gains we were able to refine the estimated magnitude of sleep׳s effect on motor skills. The raw value of improvement after a nap decreased after this correction (from ~15% to ~5%), but remained significantly higher than the control. These results suggest that sleep does indeed play a role in motor skill consolidation.

No MeSH data available.