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Re-examining sleep׳s effect on motor skills: How to access performance on the finger tapping task?

Ribeiro Pereira SI, Beijamini F, Vincenzi RA, Louzada FM - Sleep Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: By introducing a slight modification in the formula used to calculate the offline gains we were able to refine the estimated magnitude of sleep׳s effect on motor skills.The raw value of improvement after a nap decreased after this correction (from ~15% to ~5%), but remained significantly higher than the control.These results suggest that sleep does indeed play a role in motor skill consolidation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Here our goal was to determine the magnitude of sleep-related motor skill enhancement. Performance on the finger tapping task (FTT) was evaluated after a 90 min daytime nap (n=15) or after quiet wakefulness (n=15). By introducing a slight modification in the formula used to calculate the offline gains we were able to refine the estimated magnitude of sleep׳s effect on motor skills. The raw value of improvement after a nap decreased after this correction (from ~15% to ~5%), but remained significantly higher than the control. These results suggest that sleep does indeed play a role in motor skill consolidation.

No MeSH data available.


Individual performance on the training and test sessions of the FTT of the nap group (A and B) and the wake group (C and D). Results on the left-hand side represent data from the 3 last trials (A and C) and on the right-hand side the 3 best trials (B and D). Reported p-values refer to paired t-test.
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f0005: Individual performance on the training and test sessions of the FTT of the nap group (A and B) and the wake group (C and D). Results on the left-hand side represent data from the 3 last trials (A and C) and on the right-hand side the 3 best trials (B and D). Reported p-values refer to paired t-test.

Mentions: After the retention interval a significant increase in speed was observed in the nap group (Fig. 1A and B) but not in the wake group (Fig. 1C and D), despite the formula used to calculate the baseline performance (3 last or 3 best).


Re-examining sleep׳s effect on motor skills: How to access performance on the finger tapping task?

Ribeiro Pereira SI, Beijamini F, Vincenzi RA, Louzada FM - Sleep Sci (2015)

Individual performance on the training and test sessions of the FTT of the nap group (A and B) and the wake group (C and D). Results on the left-hand side represent data from the 3 last trials (A and C) and on the right-hand side the 3 best trials (B and D). Reported p-values refer to paired t-test.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608897&req=5

f0005: Individual performance on the training and test sessions of the FTT of the nap group (A and B) and the wake group (C and D). Results on the left-hand side represent data from the 3 last trials (A and C) and on the right-hand side the 3 best trials (B and D). Reported p-values refer to paired t-test.
Mentions: After the retention interval a significant increase in speed was observed in the nap group (Fig. 1A and B) but not in the wake group (Fig. 1C and D), despite the formula used to calculate the baseline performance (3 last or 3 best).

Bottom Line: By introducing a slight modification in the formula used to calculate the offline gains we were able to refine the estimated magnitude of sleep׳s effect on motor skills.The raw value of improvement after a nap decreased after this correction (from ~15% to ~5%), but remained significantly higher than the control.These results suggest that sleep does indeed play a role in motor skill consolidation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physiology, Federal University of Paraná, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Here our goal was to determine the magnitude of sleep-related motor skill enhancement. Performance on the finger tapping task (FTT) was evaluated after a 90 min daytime nap (n=15) or after quiet wakefulness (n=15). By introducing a slight modification in the formula used to calculate the offline gains we were able to refine the estimated magnitude of sleep׳s effect on motor skills. The raw value of improvement after a nap decreased after this correction (from ~15% to ~5%), but remained significantly higher than the control. These results suggest that sleep does indeed play a role in motor skill consolidation.

No MeSH data available.