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No Association between Personality and Candidate Gene Polymorphisms in a Wild Bird Population.

Edwards HA, Hajduk GK, Durieux G, Burke T, Dugdale HL - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: One way that behaviour can evolve is to have a genetic basis.The result was not due to lack of power, and indicates that there was no association between these behaviours and variation in the candidate genes tested in this population.These findings provide important data to facilitate representative future meta-analyses on candidate personality genes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Consistency of between-individual differences in behaviour or personality is a phenomenon in populations that can have ecological consequences and evolutionary potential. One way that behaviour can evolve is to have a genetic basis. Identifying the molecular genetic basis of personality could therefore provide insight into how and why such variation is maintained, particularly in natural populations. Previously identified candidate genes for personality in birds include the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4), and serotonin transporter (SERT). Studies of wild bird populations have shown that exploratory and bold behaviours are associated with polymorphisms in both DRD4 and SERT. Here we tested for polymorphisms in DRD4 and SERT in the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis) population on Cousin Island, Seychelles, and then investigated correlations between personality and polymorphisms in these genes. We found no genetic variation in DRD4, but identified four polymorphisms in SERT that clustered into five haplotypes. There was no correlation between bold or exploratory behaviours and SERT polymorphisms/haplotypes. The result was not due to lack of power, and indicates that there was no association between these behaviours and variation in the candidate genes tested in this population. These findings provide important data to facilitate representative future meta-analyses on candidate personality genes.

No MeSH data available.


The coefficients and associated 95% confidence intervals of the additive haplotype models for exploratory behaviour.The models are relative to individuals with no copies of the haplotype, subordinate is relative to dominant, male is relative to female.
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pone.0138439.g004: The coefficients and associated 95% confidence intervals of the additive haplotype models for exploratory behaviour.The models are relative to individuals with no copies of the haplotype, subordinate is relative to dominant, male is relative to female.


No Association between Personality and Candidate Gene Polymorphisms in a Wild Bird Population.

Edwards HA, Hajduk GK, Durieux G, Burke T, Dugdale HL - PLoS ONE (2015)

The coefficients and associated 95% confidence intervals of the additive haplotype models for exploratory behaviour.The models are relative to individuals with no copies of the haplotype, subordinate is relative to dominant, male is relative to female.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608812&req=5

pone.0138439.g004: The coefficients and associated 95% confidence intervals of the additive haplotype models for exploratory behaviour.The models are relative to individuals with no copies of the haplotype, subordinate is relative to dominant, male is relative to female.
Bottom Line: One way that behaviour can evolve is to have a genetic basis.The result was not due to lack of power, and indicates that there was no association between these behaviours and variation in the candidate genes tested in this population.These findings provide important data to facilitate representative future meta-analyses on candidate personality genes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Consistency of between-individual differences in behaviour or personality is a phenomenon in populations that can have ecological consequences and evolutionary potential. One way that behaviour can evolve is to have a genetic basis. Identifying the molecular genetic basis of personality could therefore provide insight into how and why such variation is maintained, particularly in natural populations. Previously identified candidate genes for personality in birds include the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4), and serotonin transporter (SERT). Studies of wild bird populations have shown that exploratory and bold behaviours are associated with polymorphisms in both DRD4 and SERT. Here we tested for polymorphisms in DRD4 and SERT in the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis) population on Cousin Island, Seychelles, and then investigated correlations between personality and polymorphisms in these genes. We found no genetic variation in DRD4, but identified four polymorphisms in SERT that clustered into five haplotypes. There was no correlation between bold or exploratory behaviours and SERT polymorphisms/haplotypes. The result was not due to lack of power, and indicates that there was no association between these behaviours and variation in the candidate genes tested in this population. These findings provide important data to facilitate representative future meta-analyses on candidate personality genes.

No MeSH data available.