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No Association between Personality and Candidate Gene Polymorphisms in a Wild Bird Population.

Edwards HA, Hajduk GK, Durieux G, Burke T, Dugdale HL - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: One way that behaviour can evolve is to have a genetic basis.The result was not due to lack of power, and indicates that there was no association between these behaviours and variation in the candidate genes tested in this population.These findings provide important data to facilitate representative future meta-analyses on candidate personality genes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Consistency of between-individual differences in behaviour or personality is a phenomenon in populations that can have ecological consequences and evolutionary potential. One way that behaviour can evolve is to have a genetic basis. Identifying the molecular genetic basis of personality could therefore provide insight into how and why such variation is maintained, particularly in natural populations. Previously identified candidate genes for personality in birds include the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4), and serotonin transporter (SERT). Studies of wild bird populations have shown that exploratory and bold behaviours are associated with polymorphisms in both DRD4 and SERT. Here we tested for polymorphisms in DRD4 and SERT in the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis) population on Cousin Island, Seychelles, and then investigated correlations between personality and polymorphisms in these genes. We found no genetic variation in DRD4, but identified four polymorphisms in SERT that clustered into five haplotypes. There was no correlation between bold or exploratory behaviours and SERT polymorphisms/haplotypes. The result was not due to lack of power, and indicates that there was no association between these behaviours and variation in the candidate genes tested in this population. These findings provide important data to facilitate representative future meta-analyses on candidate personality genes.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic representation of the DRD4 and SERT regions.Grey boxes represent exons and the dotted line introns. The vertical black lines indicate the locations of the primers used in this study.
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pone.0138439.g001: Schematic representation of the DRD4 and SERT regions.Grey boxes represent exons and the dotted line introns. The vertical black lines indicate the locations of the primers used in this study.

Mentions: DRD4 exon 3 sequences from the great tit DQ006802, the chicken Gallus gallus NP001136321, blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) JN986724.1 and blackcap Sylvia atricapilla (AEC22814.1), and SERT chromosome 19 sequences from the blackbird Turdus merula KC584781, collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis AGTO02004766.1 and zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata ABQF01026424, were aligned using Mega 5.2 [39] to design conserved primers. By looking for conserved sequences we designed suitable primers, tested their capability in Primer 3 0.4.0, length: 18–22 bp, melting temp: 59–61°C [40], and then ran the FASTA sequence in Genbank BLASTN 2.2.28 [41]. The graphical alignment output from BLASTN for the presence of conserved segments among the sequences was inspected to check that primer sets amplified the DNA products of predicted size and target area (Fig 1). Three primer sets resulted: DRD4_395 (709 bp of the end region), DRD4_349 (290 bp of the start region) and SERT_592 (394 bp of the non-coding end region, Table 1). Although SERT_592 amplified a non-coding end region (approx 470 bp from the end of SERT exon), non-coding regions can alter the level of gene expression and behaviour [42] and linkage disequilibrium (LD) was expected to be high in the Seychelles warbler.


No Association between Personality and Candidate Gene Polymorphisms in a Wild Bird Population.

Edwards HA, Hajduk GK, Durieux G, Burke T, Dugdale HL - PLoS ONE (2015)

Schematic representation of the DRD4 and SERT regions.Grey boxes represent exons and the dotted line introns. The vertical black lines indicate the locations of the primers used in this study.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608812&req=5

pone.0138439.g001: Schematic representation of the DRD4 and SERT regions.Grey boxes represent exons and the dotted line introns. The vertical black lines indicate the locations of the primers used in this study.
Mentions: DRD4 exon 3 sequences from the great tit DQ006802, the chicken Gallus gallus NP001136321, blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) JN986724.1 and blackcap Sylvia atricapilla (AEC22814.1), and SERT chromosome 19 sequences from the blackbird Turdus merula KC584781, collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis AGTO02004766.1 and zebra finch Taeniopygia guttata ABQF01026424, were aligned using Mega 5.2 [39] to design conserved primers. By looking for conserved sequences we designed suitable primers, tested their capability in Primer 3 0.4.0, length: 18–22 bp, melting temp: 59–61°C [40], and then ran the FASTA sequence in Genbank BLASTN 2.2.28 [41]. The graphical alignment output from BLASTN for the presence of conserved segments among the sequences was inspected to check that primer sets amplified the DNA products of predicted size and target area (Fig 1). Three primer sets resulted: DRD4_395 (709 bp of the end region), DRD4_349 (290 bp of the start region) and SERT_592 (394 bp of the non-coding end region, Table 1). Although SERT_592 amplified a non-coding end region (approx 470 bp from the end of SERT exon), non-coding regions can alter the level of gene expression and behaviour [42] and linkage disequilibrium (LD) was expected to be high in the Seychelles warbler.

Bottom Line: One way that behaviour can evolve is to have a genetic basis.The result was not due to lack of power, and indicates that there was no association between these behaviours and variation in the candidate genes tested in this population.These findings provide important data to facilitate representative future meta-analyses on candidate personality genes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Consistency of between-individual differences in behaviour or personality is a phenomenon in populations that can have ecological consequences and evolutionary potential. One way that behaviour can evolve is to have a genetic basis. Identifying the molecular genetic basis of personality could therefore provide insight into how and why such variation is maintained, particularly in natural populations. Previously identified candidate genes for personality in birds include the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4), and serotonin transporter (SERT). Studies of wild bird populations have shown that exploratory and bold behaviours are associated with polymorphisms in both DRD4 and SERT. Here we tested for polymorphisms in DRD4 and SERT in the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis) population on Cousin Island, Seychelles, and then investigated correlations between personality and polymorphisms in these genes. We found no genetic variation in DRD4, but identified four polymorphisms in SERT that clustered into five haplotypes. There was no correlation between bold or exploratory behaviours and SERT polymorphisms/haplotypes. The result was not due to lack of power, and indicates that there was no association between these behaviours and variation in the candidate genes tested in this population. These findings provide important data to facilitate representative future meta-analyses on candidate personality genes.

No MeSH data available.