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Activation of Neck and Low-Back Muscles Is Reduced with the Use of a Neck Balance System Together with a Lumbar Support in Urban Drivers.

Menotti F, Labanca L, Laudani L, Giombini A, Pigozzi F, Macaluso A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: RMS of the low back muscles was lower with than without devices during both acceleration and deceleration of the vehicle (1.40±0.93% vs 29 2.32±1.90% and 1.88±1.45% vs 2.91±2.33%, respectively), while RMS of neck extensor muscles was reduced only during acceleration (5.18±1.96% vs 5.91±2.16%).There were no differences between the two conditions in RMS of neck flexor muscles, the pitch of the head and the VAS score.The use of these two ergonomic devices is therefore effective in reducing the activation of low-back and neck muscles during driving with no changes in the level of perceived comfort, which is likely due to rebalancing weight on the neck and giving a neutral position to lumbar segments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Movement, Human and Health Sciences, University of Rome Foro Italico, Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Driving is associated with high activation of low-back and neck muscles due to the sitting position and perturbations imposed by the vehicle. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of a neck balance system together with a lumbar support on the activation of low-back and neck muscles during driving. Twelve healthy male subjects (age 32±6.71 years) were asked to drive in two conditions: 1) with devices; 2) without devices. During vehicle accelerations and decelerations root mean square (RMS) of surface electromyography (sEMG) was recorded from the erector spinae, semispinalis capitis and sternocleidomastoid muscles and expressed as a percentage of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). The pitch of the head was obtained by means of an inertial sensor placed on the subjects' head. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess the level of perceived comfort. RMS of the low back muscles was lower with than without devices during both acceleration and deceleration of the vehicle (1.40±0.93% vs 29 2.32±1.90% and 1.88±1.45% vs 2.91±2.33%, respectively), while RMS of neck extensor muscles was reduced only during acceleration (5.18±1.96% vs 5.91±2.16%). There were no differences between the two conditions in RMS of neck flexor muscles, the pitch of the head and the VAS score. The use of these two ergonomic devices is therefore effective in reducing the activation of low-back and neck muscles during driving with no changes in the level of perceived comfort, which is likely due to rebalancing weight on the neck and giving a neutral position to lumbar segments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

RMS of sEMG of neck extensor muscles (mean±SE) expressed as a percentage of MVC during vehicle acceleration (on the left) and vehicle deceleration (on the right) in participants with and without ergonomic devices.*p <0.05.
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pone.0141031.g005: RMS of sEMG of neck extensor muscles (mean±SE) expressed as a percentage of MVC during vehicle acceleration (on the left) and vehicle deceleration (on the right) in participants with and without ergonomic devices.*p <0.05.

Mentions: RMS of the sEMG signal in the neck extensor muscles for both vehicle acceleration and deceleration phases with and without ergonomic devices is shown in Fig 5. The RMS of the neck extensor muscles was significantly lower when driving with the devices than without during the acceleration phases of the vehicle (P<0.05), but not during deceleration. In contrast, RMS of the sEMG signal in the neck flexor muscles did not differ between the two conditions (with devices, without devices) neither in acceleration phases (2.44%± 1.08 with; 2.34%±1.20 without) nor in deceleration phases (2.11%± 0.91 with; 2.01%±1.02 without; P>0.05).


Activation of Neck and Low-Back Muscles Is Reduced with the Use of a Neck Balance System Together with a Lumbar Support in Urban Drivers.

Menotti F, Labanca L, Laudani L, Giombini A, Pigozzi F, Macaluso A - PLoS ONE (2015)

RMS of sEMG of neck extensor muscles (mean±SE) expressed as a percentage of MVC during vehicle acceleration (on the left) and vehicle deceleration (on the right) in participants with and without ergonomic devices.*p <0.05.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608778&req=5

pone.0141031.g005: RMS of sEMG of neck extensor muscles (mean±SE) expressed as a percentage of MVC during vehicle acceleration (on the left) and vehicle deceleration (on the right) in participants with and without ergonomic devices.*p <0.05.
Mentions: RMS of the sEMG signal in the neck extensor muscles for both vehicle acceleration and deceleration phases with and without ergonomic devices is shown in Fig 5. The RMS of the neck extensor muscles was significantly lower when driving with the devices than without during the acceleration phases of the vehicle (P<0.05), but not during deceleration. In contrast, RMS of the sEMG signal in the neck flexor muscles did not differ between the two conditions (with devices, without devices) neither in acceleration phases (2.44%± 1.08 with; 2.34%±1.20 without) nor in deceleration phases (2.11%± 0.91 with; 2.01%±1.02 without; P>0.05).

Bottom Line: RMS of the low back muscles was lower with than without devices during both acceleration and deceleration of the vehicle (1.40±0.93% vs 29 2.32±1.90% and 1.88±1.45% vs 2.91±2.33%, respectively), while RMS of neck extensor muscles was reduced only during acceleration (5.18±1.96% vs 5.91±2.16%).There were no differences between the two conditions in RMS of neck flexor muscles, the pitch of the head and the VAS score.The use of these two ergonomic devices is therefore effective in reducing the activation of low-back and neck muscles during driving with no changes in the level of perceived comfort, which is likely due to rebalancing weight on the neck and giving a neutral position to lumbar segments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Movement, Human and Health Sciences, University of Rome Foro Italico, Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Driving is associated with high activation of low-back and neck muscles due to the sitting position and perturbations imposed by the vehicle. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of a neck balance system together with a lumbar support on the activation of low-back and neck muscles during driving. Twelve healthy male subjects (age 32±6.71 years) were asked to drive in two conditions: 1) with devices; 2) without devices. During vehicle accelerations and decelerations root mean square (RMS) of surface electromyography (sEMG) was recorded from the erector spinae, semispinalis capitis and sternocleidomastoid muscles and expressed as a percentage of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). The pitch of the head was obtained by means of an inertial sensor placed on the subjects' head. A visual analog scale (VAS) was used to assess the level of perceived comfort. RMS of the low back muscles was lower with than without devices during both acceleration and deceleration of the vehicle (1.40±0.93% vs 29 2.32±1.90% and 1.88±1.45% vs 2.91±2.33%, respectively), while RMS of neck extensor muscles was reduced only during acceleration (5.18±1.96% vs 5.91±2.16%). There were no differences between the two conditions in RMS of neck flexor muscles, the pitch of the head and the VAS score. The use of these two ergonomic devices is therefore effective in reducing the activation of low-back and neck muscles during driving with no changes in the level of perceived comfort, which is likely due to rebalancing weight on the neck and giving a neutral position to lumbar segments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus