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mPneumonia: Development of an Innovative mHealth Application for Diagnosing and Treating Childhood Pneumonia and Other Childhood Illnesses in Low-Resource Settings.

Ginsburg AS, Delarosa J, Brunette W, Levari S, Sundt M, Larson C, Tawiah Agyemang C, Newton S, Borriello G, Anderson R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide.In an effort to address childhood pneumonia mortality and improve frontline health care providers' ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, PATH collaborated with the University of Washington to develop "mPneumonia," an innovative mobile health application using an Android tablet. mPneumonia integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pediatric pulse oximeter.The results of the field test provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among health care providers, and identifying approaches to iterate and improve.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PATH, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide. Each year, pneumonia kills an estimated 935,000 children under five years of age, with most of these deaths occurring in developing countries. The current approach for pneumonia diagnosis in low-resource settings--using the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) paper-based protocols and relying on a health care provider's ability to manually count respiratory rate--has proven inadequate. Furthermore, hypoxemia--a diagnostic indicator of the presence and severity of pneumonia often associated with an increased risk of death--is not assessed because pulse oximetry is frequently not available in low-resource settings. In an effort to address childhood pneumonia mortality and improve frontline health care providers' ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, PATH collaborated with the University of Washington to develop "mPneumonia," an innovative mobile health application using an Android tablet. mPneumonia integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pediatric pulse oximeter. We conducted a design-stage usability field test of mPneumonia in Ghana, with the goal of creating a user-friendly diagnostic and management tool for childhood pneumonia and other childhood illnesses that would improve diagnostic accuracy and facilitate adherence by health care providers to established guidelines in low-resource settings. The results of the field test provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among health care providers, and identifying approaches to iterate and improve. This critical feedback helped ascertain the common failure modes related to the user interface design, navigation, and accessibility of mPneumonia and the modifications required to improve user experience and create a tool aimed at decreasing mortality from pneumonia and other childhood illnesses in low-resource settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Screenshots Displaying mPneumonia Assessment Questions and Pulse Oximeter.
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pone.0139625.g001: Screenshots Displaying mPneumonia Assessment Questions and Pulse Oximeter.

Mentions: The results of the initial field test in Ghana provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among HCPs. This critical feedback helped identify the common failure modes related to the user interface design, navigation, and accessibility of mPneumonia and the modifications required to improve the user experience (Tables 3 and 4). Larger-sized buttons and the use of colors have now been incorporated into the next iteration of the mPneumonia prototype to address the frequent misinterpretation of the software buttons as a set of instructions instead of as a key to press. Additional changes included: removing scrolling, enlarging font size of text, simplifying questions to “yes/no” answers, providing feedback to the HCP on answer selections, positioning answer selection buttons horizontally instead of vertically, and adding navigation buttons to the bottom of the screen (Fig 1). Appropriate utilization of different colors, shapes, sizes, shading, icons, and images may improve the user experience and have the potential to translate into significant improvements in the efficiency and accuracy of mPneumonia.


mPneumonia: Development of an Innovative mHealth Application for Diagnosing and Treating Childhood Pneumonia and Other Childhood Illnesses in Low-Resource Settings.

Ginsburg AS, Delarosa J, Brunette W, Levari S, Sundt M, Larson C, Tawiah Agyemang C, Newton S, Borriello G, Anderson R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Screenshots Displaying mPneumonia Assessment Questions and Pulse Oximeter.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608740&req=5

pone.0139625.g001: Screenshots Displaying mPneumonia Assessment Questions and Pulse Oximeter.
Mentions: The results of the initial field test in Ghana provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among HCPs. This critical feedback helped identify the common failure modes related to the user interface design, navigation, and accessibility of mPneumonia and the modifications required to improve the user experience (Tables 3 and 4). Larger-sized buttons and the use of colors have now been incorporated into the next iteration of the mPneumonia prototype to address the frequent misinterpretation of the software buttons as a set of instructions instead of as a key to press. Additional changes included: removing scrolling, enlarging font size of text, simplifying questions to “yes/no” answers, providing feedback to the HCP on answer selections, positioning answer selection buttons horizontally instead of vertically, and adding navigation buttons to the bottom of the screen (Fig 1). Appropriate utilization of different colors, shapes, sizes, shading, icons, and images may improve the user experience and have the potential to translate into significant improvements in the efficiency and accuracy of mPneumonia.

Bottom Line: Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide.In an effort to address childhood pneumonia mortality and improve frontline health care providers' ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, PATH collaborated with the University of Washington to develop "mPneumonia," an innovative mobile health application using an Android tablet. mPneumonia integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pediatric pulse oximeter.The results of the field test provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among health care providers, and identifying approaches to iterate and improve.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PATH, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death in children worldwide. Each year, pneumonia kills an estimated 935,000 children under five years of age, with most of these deaths occurring in developing countries. The current approach for pneumonia diagnosis in low-resource settings--using the World Health Organization Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) paper-based protocols and relying on a health care provider's ability to manually count respiratory rate--has proven inadequate. Furthermore, hypoxemia--a diagnostic indicator of the presence and severity of pneumonia often associated with an increased risk of death--is not assessed because pulse oximetry is frequently not available in low-resource settings. In an effort to address childhood pneumonia mortality and improve frontline health care providers' ability to diagnose, classify, and manage pneumonia and other childhood illnesses, PATH collaborated with the University of Washington to develop "mPneumonia," an innovative mobile health application using an Android tablet. mPneumonia integrates a digital version of the IMCI algorithm with a software-based breath counter and a pediatric pulse oximeter. We conducted a design-stage usability field test of mPneumonia in Ghana, with the goal of creating a user-friendly diagnostic and management tool for childhood pneumonia and other childhood illnesses that would improve diagnostic accuracy and facilitate adherence by health care providers to established guidelines in low-resource settings. The results of the field test provided valuable information for understanding the usability and acceptability of mPneumonia among health care providers, and identifying approaches to iterate and improve. This critical feedback helped ascertain the common failure modes related to the user interface design, navigation, and accessibility of mPneumonia and the modifications required to improve user experience and create a tool aimed at decreasing mortality from pneumonia and other childhood illnesses in low-resource settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus