Limits...
Music Therapy Using Singing Training Improves Psychomotor Speed in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Neuropsychological and fMRI Study.

Satoh M, Yuba T, Tabei K, Okubo Y, Kida H, Sakuma H, Tomimoto H - Dement Geriatr Cogn Dis Extra (2015)

Bottom Line: Each session was performed with professional musicians using karaoke and a unique voice training method (the YUBA Method).In the music therapy group, the time for completion of the Japanese Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices was significantly reduced (p = 0.026), and the results obtained from interviewing the patients' caregivers revealed a significant decrease in the Neuropsychiatric Inventory score (p = 0.042) and a prolongation of the patients' sleep time (p = 0.039).Music therapy intervention using singing training may be useful for dementia patients by improving the neural efficacy of cognitive processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dementia Prevention and Therapeutics, Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: To investigate the effect of singing training on the cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients.

Methods: Ten AD patients (mean age 78.1 years) participated in music therapy using singing training once a week for 6 months (music therapy group). Each session was performed with professional musicians using karaoke and a unique voice training method (the YUBA Method). Before and after the intervention period, each patient was assessed by neuropsychological batteries, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed while the patients sang familiar songs with a karaoke device. As the control group, another 10 AD patients were recruited (mean age 77.0 years), and neuropsychological assessments were performed twice with an interval of 6 months.

Results: In the music therapy group, the time for completion of the Japanese Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices was significantly reduced (p = 0.026), and the results obtained from interviewing the patients' caregivers revealed a significant decrease in the Neuropsychiatric Inventory score (p = 0.042) and a prolongation of the patients' sleep time (p = 0.039). The fMRI study revealed increased activity in the right angular gyrus and the left lingual gyrus in the before-minus-after subtraction analysis of the music therapy intervention.

Conclusion: Music therapy intervention using singing training may be useful for dementia patients by improving the neural efficacy of cognitive processing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Brain regions significantly activated before the music therapy intervention period compared with after the therapy. a Surface maps. b Axial images. L = Left.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608626&req=5

Figure 1: Brain regions significantly activated before the music therapy intervention period compared with after the therapy. a Surface maps. b Axial images. L = Left.

Mentions: The results of the difference in the activation maps during the karaoke task for the subtraction calculation before-minus-after the music therapy intervention period are plotted in table 5, and activation sites are shown in figure 1. More than 10 active voxels are plotted. The before-minus-after calculation for the music therapy intervention revealed increased activity at the right angular gyrus and the anterior portion of the left lingual gyrus. Other comparisons, that is the after-minus-before intervention during the karaoke task, and both subtractions (before minus after and after minus before) during the pitch task revealed no significant activation.


Music Therapy Using Singing Training Improves Psychomotor Speed in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease: A Neuropsychological and fMRI Study.

Satoh M, Yuba T, Tabei K, Okubo Y, Kida H, Sakuma H, Tomimoto H - Dement Geriatr Cogn Dis Extra (2015)

Brain regions significantly activated before the music therapy intervention period compared with after the therapy. a Surface maps. b Axial images. L = Left.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608626&req=5

Figure 1: Brain regions significantly activated before the music therapy intervention period compared with after the therapy. a Surface maps. b Axial images. L = Left.
Mentions: The results of the difference in the activation maps during the karaoke task for the subtraction calculation before-minus-after the music therapy intervention period are plotted in table 5, and activation sites are shown in figure 1. More than 10 active voxels are plotted. The before-minus-after calculation for the music therapy intervention revealed increased activity at the right angular gyrus and the anterior portion of the left lingual gyrus. Other comparisons, that is the after-minus-before intervention during the karaoke task, and both subtractions (before minus after and after minus before) during the pitch task revealed no significant activation.

Bottom Line: Each session was performed with professional musicians using karaoke and a unique voice training method (the YUBA Method).In the music therapy group, the time for completion of the Japanese Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices was significantly reduced (p = 0.026), and the results obtained from interviewing the patients' caregivers revealed a significant decrease in the Neuropsychiatric Inventory score (p = 0.042) and a prolongation of the patients' sleep time (p = 0.039).Music therapy intervention using singing training may be useful for dementia patients by improving the neural efficacy of cognitive processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dementia Prevention and Therapeutics, Graduate School of Medicine, Tsu, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background/aims: To investigate the effect of singing training on the cognitive function in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients.

Methods: Ten AD patients (mean age 78.1 years) participated in music therapy using singing training once a week for 6 months (music therapy group). Each session was performed with professional musicians using karaoke and a unique voice training method (the YUBA Method). Before and after the intervention period, each patient was assessed by neuropsychological batteries, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed while the patients sang familiar songs with a karaoke device. As the control group, another 10 AD patients were recruited (mean age 77.0 years), and neuropsychological assessments were performed twice with an interval of 6 months.

Results: In the music therapy group, the time for completion of the Japanese Raven's Colored Progressive Matrices was significantly reduced (p = 0.026), and the results obtained from interviewing the patients' caregivers revealed a significant decrease in the Neuropsychiatric Inventory score (p = 0.042) and a prolongation of the patients' sleep time (p = 0.039). The fMRI study revealed increased activity in the right angular gyrus and the left lingual gyrus in the before-minus-after subtraction analysis of the music therapy intervention.

Conclusion: Music therapy intervention using singing training may be useful for dementia patients by improving the neural efficacy of cognitive processing.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus