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Conjunctival Microangiopathy in a Patient with Neovascular Glaucoma.

Abdul-Rahman AM, Molteno A - Case Rep Ophthalmol (2015)

Bottom Line: Capillaries were tortuous, with sparse microaneurysm formation, and arterioles were attenuated.We are unaware of previous reports in the literature on conjunctival microangiopathy secondary to diabetes presenting as a red eye.We hypothesized that the clinical features in our case may have been modified by a combination of postoperative wound healing and degenerative vascular remodeling, in addition to microvascular alterations secondary to both diabetes and consequent ocular ischemia, which may have played a role.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Counties Manukau DHB, Auckland, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report a case of conjunctival microangiopathy secondary to diabetes presenting as a red eye 5 years after glaucoma implant surgery for neovascular glaucoma.

Materials and methods: A 52-year-old Tongan male with a past history of neovascular glaucoma secondary to proliferative diabetic retinopathy underwent slitlamp examination and color photography of the anterior and posterior segment, in addition to anterior segment fluorescein angiography.

Results: The conjunctival venules perilimbally demonstrated tortuosity and dilation (saccular, fusiform and tricornuate). Capillaries were tortuous, with sparse microaneurysm formation, and arterioles were attenuated. Anterior segment fluorescein angiography showed generalized iris ischemia, extensive perilimbal microvascular degenerative changes and leakage of fluorescein into the anterior chamber. We are unaware of previous reports in the literature on conjunctival microangiopathy secondary to diabetes presenting as a red eye.

Conclusions: We hypothesized that the clinical features in our case may have been modified by a combination of postoperative wound healing and degenerative vascular remodeling, in addition to microvascular alterations secondary to both diabetes and consequent ocular ischemia, which may have played a role.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Color photograph of the posterior segment showing the thin, hyalinized retinal arterioles and peripheral laser scars. There was no evidence of active neovascularization.
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Figure 2: Color photograph of the posterior segment showing the thin, hyalinized retinal arterioles and peripheral laser scars. There was no evidence of active neovascularization.

Mentions: The pupil was oval with the long axis temporally superior, and the iris demonstrated inferior sectoral atrophy involving 2 clock hours. Posterior segment examination showed a C/D ratio of 0.6 with inferior thinning and peripheral laser scars. The retinal vasculature of the venous tree appeared normal in caliber; however, the retinal arterioles were attenuated and hyalinized (fig. 2).


Conjunctival Microangiopathy in a Patient with Neovascular Glaucoma.

Abdul-Rahman AM, Molteno A - Case Rep Ophthalmol (2015)

Color photograph of the posterior segment showing the thin, hyalinized retinal arterioles and peripheral laser scars. There was no evidence of active neovascularization.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608607&req=5

Figure 2: Color photograph of the posterior segment showing the thin, hyalinized retinal arterioles and peripheral laser scars. There was no evidence of active neovascularization.
Mentions: The pupil was oval with the long axis temporally superior, and the iris demonstrated inferior sectoral atrophy involving 2 clock hours. Posterior segment examination showed a C/D ratio of 0.6 with inferior thinning and peripheral laser scars. The retinal vasculature of the venous tree appeared normal in caliber; however, the retinal arterioles were attenuated and hyalinized (fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Capillaries were tortuous, with sparse microaneurysm formation, and arterioles were attenuated.We are unaware of previous reports in the literature on conjunctival microangiopathy secondary to diabetes presenting as a red eye.We hypothesized that the clinical features in our case may have been modified by a combination of postoperative wound healing and degenerative vascular remodeling, in addition to microvascular alterations secondary to both diabetes and consequent ocular ischemia, which may have played a role.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Counties Manukau DHB, Auckland, New Zealand.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To report a case of conjunctival microangiopathy secondary to diabetes presenting as a red eye 5 years after glaucoma implant surgery for neovascular glaucoma.

Materials and methods: A 52-year-old Tongan male with a past history of neovascular glaucoma secondary to proliferative diabetic retinopathy underwent slitlamp examination and color photography of the anterior and posterior segment, in addition to anterior segment fluorescein angiography.

Results: The conjunctival venules perilimbally demonstrated tortuosity and dilation (saccular, fusiform and tricornuate). Capillaries were tortuous, with sparse microaneurysm formation, and arterioles were attenuated. Anterior segment fluorescein angiography showed generalized iris ischemia, extensive perilimbal microvascular degenerative changes and leakage of fluorescein into the anterior chamber. We are unaware of previous reports in the literature on conjunctival microangiopathy secondary to diabetes presenting as a red eye.

Conclusions: We hypothesized that the clinical features in our case may have been modified by a combination of postoperative wound healing and degenerative vascular remodeling, in addition to microvascular alterations secondary to both diabetes and consequent ocular ischemia, which may have played a role.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus