Limits...
Fear of pain potentiates nocebo hyperalgesia.

Aslaksen PM, Lyby PS - J Pain Res (2015)

Bottom Line: The results revealed that pain and stress levels were significantly higher in the Nocebo group after nocebo treatment.There were no significant associations between any of the personality factors and the nocebo hyperalgesic effect.Furthermore, measurement of traits that are specific to pain experience is probably better suited for prediction of nocebo hyperalgesic responses compared to broad measures of personality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Research Group for Cognitive Neuroscience, The Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.

ABSTRACT
Nocebo hyperalgesia has received sparse experimental attention compared to placebo analgesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits and fear of pain could predict experimental nocebo hyperalgesia. One hundred and eleven healthy volunteers (76 females) participated in an experimental study in which personality traits and fear of pain were measured prior to induction of thermal heat pain. Personality traits were measured by the Big-Five Inventory-10. Fear of pain was measured by the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III. Heat pain was induced by a PC-controlled thermode. Pain was measured by a computerized visual analog scale. Stress levels during the experiment were measured by numerical rating scales. The participants were randomized to a Nocebo group or to a no-treatment Natural History group. The results revealed that pain and stress levels were significantly higher in the Nocebo group after nocebo treatment. Mediation analysis showed that higher levels of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III factor "fear of medical pain" significantly increased stress levels after nocebo treatment and that higher stress levels were associated with increased nocebo hyperalgesic responses. There were no significant associations between any of the personality factors and the nocebo hyperalgesic effect. The results from the present study suggest that dispositional fear of pain might be a useful predictor for nocebo hyperalgesia and emotional states concomitant with expectations of increased pain. Furthermore, measurement of traits that are specific to pain experience is probably better suited for prediction of nocebo hyperalgesic responses compared to broad measures of personality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Overview of the mediation analysis for the Nocebo group.Notes:B = regression coefficient. Pain change = Pretest − Posttest 2.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608595&req=5

f2-jpr-8-703: Overview of the mediation analysis for the Nocebo group.Notes:B = regression coefficient. Pain change = Pretest − Posttest 2.

Mentions: The total effect of “fear of medical pain” on pain change when controlling for sex and age was significant (B=−0.35, t=−2.17, P=0.03). The change in reported stress mediated the change in pain (nocebo effect), shown by the effect of “fear of medical pain” on the change in stress (B=0.08, t=2.06, P=0.04) and by the effect of stress change on pain change (B=1.50, t=2.73, P=0.008). The covariate sex was significant, showing that females reported a higher nocebo effect compared to males (B=7.21, t=3.03, P=0.004). There was no effect of the covariate age (P=0.55). The explained variance for the whole model was 32% (R2=0.32). Figure 2 shows an overview of the mediation model in the Nocebo group. When performing the same mediation model on the Natural History group, no significant mediation effects were found, and the relation of “fear of medical pain” to stress change was nonsignificant (B=0.03, t=0.77, P=0.43).


Fear of pain potentiates nocebo hyperalgesia.

Aslaksen PM, Lyby PS - J Pain Res (2015)

Overview of the mediation analysis for the Nocebo group.Notes:B = regression coefficient. Pain change = Pretest − Posttest 2.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608595&req=5

f2-jpr-8-703: Overview of the mediation analysis for the Nocebo group.Notes:B = regression coefficient. Pain change = Pretest − Posttest 2.
Mentions: The total effect of “fear of medical pain” on pain change when controlling for sex and age was significant (B=−0.35, t=−2.17, P=0.03). The change in reported stress mediated the change in pain (nocebo effect), shown by the effect of “fear of medical pain” on the change in stress (B=0.08, t=2.06, P=0.04) and by the effect of stress change on pain change (B=1.50, t=2.73, P=0.008). The covariate sex was significant, showing that females reported a higher nocebo effect compared to males (B=7.21, t=3.03, P=0.004). There was no effect of the covariate age (P=0.55). The explained variance for the whole model was 32% (R2=0.32). Figure 2 shows an overview of the mediation model in the Nocebo group. When performing the same mediation model on the Natural History group, no significant mediation effects were found, and the relation of “fear of medical pain” to stress change was nonsignificant (B=0.03, t=0.77, P=0.43).

Bottom Line: The results revealed that pain and stress levels were significantly higher in the Nocebo group after nocebo treatment.There were no significant associations between any of the personality factors and the nocebo hyperalgesic effect.Furthermore, measurement of traits that are specific to pain experience is probably better suited for prediction of nocebo hyperalgesic responses compared to broad measures of personality.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Research Group for Cognitive Neuroscience, The Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.

ABSTRACT
Nocebo hyperalgesia has received sparse experimental attention compared to placebo analgesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate if personality traits and fear of pain could predict experimental nocebo hyperalgesia. One hundred and eleven healthy volunteers (76 females) participated in an experimental study in which personality traits and fear of pain were measured prior to induction of thermal heat pain. Personality traits were measured by the Big-Five Inventory-10. Fear of pain was measured by the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III. Heat pain was induced by a PC-controlled thermode. Pain was measured by a computerized visual analog scale. Stress levels during the experiment were measured by numerical rating scales. The participants were randomized to a Nocebo group or to a no-treatment Natural History group. The results revealed that pain and stress levels were significantly higher in the Nocebo group after nocebo treatment. Mediation analysis showed that higher levels of the Fear of Pain Questionnaire III factor "fear of medical pain" significantly increased stress levels after nocebo treatment and that higher stress levels were associated with increased nocebo hyperalgesic responses. There were no significant associations between any of the personality factors and the nocebo hyperalgesic effect. The results from the present study suggest that dispositional fear of pain might be a useful predictor for nocebo hyperalgesia and emotional states concomitant with expectations of increased pain. Furthermore, measurement of traits that are specific to pain experience is probably better suited for prediction of nocebo hyperalgesic responses compared to broad measures of personality.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus