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Resistance Exercise Attenuates High-Fructose, High-Fat-Induced Postprandial Lipemia.

Wilburn JR, Bourquin J, Wysong A, Melby CL - Nutr Metab Insights (2015)

Bottom Line: Meals rich in both fructose and fat are commonly consumed by many Americans, especially young men, which can produce a significant postprandial lipemic response.The six-hour postprandial plasma insulin and lactate responses did not differ between conditions.However, the postprandial plasma TAG concentrations were 16.5% and 24.4% lower for EX-COMP (551.0 ± 80.5 mg/dL × 360 minutes) and EX-DEF (499.4 ± 73.5 mg/dL × 360 minutes), respectively, compared to CON (660.2 ± 95.0 mg/dL × 360 minutes) (P < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Nutrition and Metabolic Fitness Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Meals rich in both fructose and fat are commonly consumed by many Americans, especially young men, which can produce a significant postprandial lipemic response. Increasing evidence suggests that aerobic exercise can attenuate the postprandial increase in plasma triacylglycerols (TAGs) in response to a high-fat or a high-fructose meal. However, it is unknown if resistance exercise can dampen the postprandial lipemic response to a meal rich in both fructose and fat.

Methods: Eight apparently healthy men (Mean ± SEM; age = 27 ± 2 years) participated in a crossover study to examine the effects of acute resistance exercise on next-day postprandial lipemia resulting from a high-fructose, high-fat meal. Participants completed three separate two-day conditions in a random order: (1) EX-COMP: a full-body weightlifting workout with the provision of additional kilocalories to compensate for the estimated net energy cost of exercise on day 1, followed by the consumption of a high-fructose, high-fat liquid test meal the next morning (day 2) (~600 kcal) and the determination of the plasma glucose, lactate, insulin, and TAG responses during a six-hour postprandial period; (2) EX-DEF: same condition as EX-COMP but without exercise energy compensation on day 1; and (3) CON: no exercise control.

Results: The six-hour postprandial plasma insulin and lactate responses did not differ between conditions. However, the postprandial plasma TAG concentrations were 16.5% and 24.4% lower for EX-COMP (551.0 ± 80.5 mg/dL × 360 minutes) and EX-DEF (499.4 ± 73.5 mg/dL × 360 minutes), respectively, compared to CON (660.2 ± 95.0 mg/dL × 360 minutes) (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: A single resistance exercise bout, performed ~15 hours prior to a high-fructose, high-fat meal, attenuated the postprandial TAG response, as compared to a no-exercise control condition, in healthy, resistance-trained men.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean (±SEM) plasma analyte concentrations. (A) Plasma glucose concentrations at baseline (fasted values) were not significantly different between the three conditions. During the six-hour postprandial period in response to a high-fructose, high-fat liquid meal, there was a significant condition by time interaction. Post hoc tests revealed that the mean concentrations over the six-hour period were significantly lower in EX-COMP than in EX-DEF and CON (P < 0.05). (*P < 0.05 for CON vs. EX-COMP; #P < 0.05 for CON vs. EX-DEF; ±P < 0.05 for EX-COMP vs. EX-DEF). (B) Plasma insulin concentrations at baseline (fasted values) were not significantly different between the three conditions. There was a significant time effect, but no significant time by condition interaction, during the six-hour postprandial period in response to a high-fructose, high-fat liquid meal between the three conditions. (C) Plasma lactate concentrations at baseline (fasted values) were not significantly different between the three conditions. There was a significant time effect, but no time by condition interaction, during the six-hour postprandial period in response to a high-fructose, high-fat liquid meal.
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f1-nmi-8-2015-029: Mean (±SEM) plasma analyte concentrations. (A) Plasma glucose concentrations at baseline (fasted values) were not significantly different between the three conditions. During the six-hour postprandial period in response to a high-fructose, high-fat liquid meal, there was a significant condition by time interaction. Post hoc tests revealed that the mean concentrations over the six-hour period were significantly lower in EX-COMP than in EX-DEF and CON (P < 0.05). (*P < 0.05 for CON vs. EX-COMP; #P < 0.05 for CON vs. EX-DEF; ±P < 0.05 for EX-COMP vs. EX-DEF). (B) Plasma insulin concentrations at baseline (fasted values) were not significantly different between the three conditions. There was a significant time effect, but no significant time by condition interaction, during the six-hour postprandial period in response to a high-fructose, high-fat liquid meal between the three conditions. (C) Plasma lactate concentrations at baseline (fasted values) were not significantly different between the three conditions. There was a significant time effect, but no time by condition interaction, during the six-hour postprandial period in response to a high-fructose, high-fat liquid meal.

Mentions: The plasma glucose, plasma insulin, and plasma lactate concentration data are presented in Figure 1. There were no differences in fasting glucose concentrations across the three conditions, and plasma glucose rose only modestly during the postprandial period across all the three conditions. Statistical analyses revealed a significant time effect as well as a time by condition interaction, with subsequent contrasts between conditions showing a significant difference between CON and EX-COMP and between EX-COMP and EX-DEF (P < 0.05). However, the six-hour AUC values for glucose were not different among conditions. There were no differences in fasting insulin concentrations (CON = 1.3 ± 0.2 μIU/mL EX-COMP = 1.4 ± 0.3 μIU/mL; EX-DEF = 1.5 ± 0.3 μIU/mL) or in fasting lactate (CON = 0.86 ± 0.06 mmol/L; EX-COMP = 0.83 ± 0.06 mmol/L; EX-DEF = 0.87 ± 0.07 mmol/L) across the three conditions, although as expected there was a significant time effect for insulin and lactate as they increased and then decreased during the six-hour postprandial period across the three conditions. There were no time by condition interactions for insulin or lactate, indicating that the changes in these metabolites over time were not different among the conditions.


Resistance Exercise Attenuates High-Fructose, High-Fat-Induced Postprandial Lipemia.

Wilburn JR, Bourquin J, Wysong A, Melby CL - Nutr Metab Insights (2015)

Mean (±SEM) plasma analyte concentrations. (A) Plasma glucose concentrations at baseline (fasted values) were not significantly different between the three conditions. During the six-hour postprandial period in response to a high-fructose, high-fat liquid meal, there was a significant condition by time interaction. Post hoc tests revealed that the mean concentrations over the six-hour period were significantly lower in EX-COMP than in EX-DEF and CON (P < 0.05). (*P < 0.05 for CON vs. EX-COMP; #P < 0.05 for CON vs. EX-DEF; ±P < 0.05 for EX-COMP vs. EX-DEF). (B) Plasma insulin concentrations at baseline (fasted values) were not significantly different between the three conditions. There was a significant time effect, but no significant time by condition interaction, during the six-hour postprandial period in response to a high-fructose, high-fat liquid meal between the three conditions. (C) Plasma lactate concentrations at baseline (fasted values) were not significantly different between the three conditions. There was a significant time effect, but no time by condition interaction, during the six-hour postprandial period in response to a high-fructose, high-fat liquid meal.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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f1-nmi-8-2015-029: Mean (±SEM) plasma analyte concentrations. (A) Plasma glucose concentrations at baseline (fasted values) were not significantly different between the three conditions. During the six-hour postprandial period in response to a high-fructose, high-fat liquid meal, there was a significant condition by time interaction. Post hoc tests revealed that the mean concentrations over the six-hour period were significantly lower in EX-COMP than in EX-DEF and CON (P < 0.05). (*P < 0.05 for CON vs. EX-COMP; #P < 0.05 for CON vs. EX-DEF; ±P < 0.05 for EX-COMP vs. EX-DEF). (B) Plasma insulin concentrations at baseline (fasted values) were not significantly different between the three conditions. There was a significant time effect, but no significant time by condition interaction, during the six-hour postprandial period in response to a high-fructose, high-fat liquid meal between the three conditions. (C) Plasma lactate concentrations at baseline (fasted values) were not significantly different between the three conditions. There was a significant time effect, but no time by condition interaction, during the six-hour postprandial period in response to a high-fructose, high-fat liquid meal.
Mentions: The plasma glucose, plasma insulin, and plasma lactate concentration data are presented in Figure 1. There were no differences in fasting glucose concentrations across the three conditions, and plasma glucose rose only modestly during the postprandial period across all the three conditions. Statistical analyses revealed a significant time effect as well as a time by condition interaction, with subsequent contrasts between conditions showing a significant difference between CON and EX-COMP and between EX-COMP and EX-DEF (P < 0.05). However, the six-hour AUC values for glucose were not different among conditions. There were no differences in fasting insulin concentrations (CON = 1.3 ± 0.2 μIU/mL EX-COMP = 1.4 ± 0.3 μIU/mL; EX-DEF = 1.5 ± 0.3 μIU/mL) or in fasting lactate (CON = 0.86 ± 0.06 mmol/L; EX-COMP = 0.83 ± 0.06 mmol/L; EX-DEF = 0.87 ± 0.07 mmol/L) across the three conditions, although as expected there was a significant time effect for insulin and lactate as they increased and then decreased during the six-hour postprandial period across the three conditions. There were no time by condition interactions for insulin or lactate, indicating that the changes in these metabolites over time were not different among the conditions.

Bottom Line: Meals rich in both fructose and fat are commonly consumed by many Americans, especially young men, which can produce a significant postprandial lipemic response.The six-hour postprandial plasma insulin and lactate responses did not differ between conditions.However, the postprandial plasma TAG concentrations were 16.5% and 24.4% lower for EX-COMP (551.0 ± 80.5 mg/dL × 360 minutes) and EX-DEF (499.4 ± 73.5 mg/dL × 360 minutes), respectively, compared to CON (660.2 ± 95.0 mg/dL × 360 minutes) (P < 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Nutrition and Metabolic Fitness Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Meals rich in both fructose and fat are commonly consumed by many Americans, especially young men, which can produce a significant postprandial lipemic response. Increasing evidence suggests that aerobic exercise can attenuate the postprandial increase in plasma triacylglycerols (TAGs) in response to a high-fat or a high-fructose meal. However, it is unknown if resistance exercise can dampen the postprandial lipemic response to a meal rich in both fructose and fat.

Methods: Eight apparently healthy men (Mean ± SEM; age = 27 ± 2 years) participated in a crossover study to examine the effects of acute resistance exercise on next-day postprandial lipemia resulting from a high-fructose, high-fat meal. Participants completed three separate two-day conditions in a random order: (1) EX-COMP: a full-body weightlifting workout with the provision of additional kilocalories to compensate for the estimated net energy cost of exercise on day 1, followed by the consumption of a high-fructose, high-fat liquid test meal the next morning (day 2) (~600 kcal) and the determination of the plasma glucose, lactate, insulin, and TAG responses during a six-hour postprandial period; (2) EX-DEF: same condition as EX-COMP but without exercise energy compensation on day 1; and (3) CON: no exercise control.

Results: The six-hour postprandial plasma insulin and lactate responses did not differ between conditions. However, the postprandial plasma TAG concentrations were 16.5% and 24.4% lower for EX-COMP (551.0 ± 80.5 mg/dL × 360 minutes) and EX-DEF (499.4 ± 73.5 mg/dL × 360 minutes), respectively, compared to CON (660.2 ± 95.0 mg/dL × 360 minutes) (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: A single resistance exercise bout, performed ~15 hours prior to a high-fructose, high-fat meal, attenuated the postprandial TAG response, as compared to a no-exercise control condition, in healthy, resistance-trained men.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus