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Electrochemical Nanoparticle Sizing Via Nano-Impacts: How Large a Nanoparticle Can be Measured?

Bartlett TR, Sokolov SV, Compton RG - ChemistryOpen (2015)

Bottom Line: The 'nano-impacts' technique is an excellent and qualitative in situ method for nanoparticle characterization.Two complementary studies on silver and silver bromide nanoparticles (NPs) were used to assess the large radius limit of the nano-impact method for NP sizing.Noting that by definition a NP cannot be larger than 100 nm in diameter, we have shown that the method quantitatively sizes at the largest limit, the lower limit having been previously reported as ∼6 nm.1.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QZ, UK.

ABSTRACT
The field of nanoparticle (NP) sizing encompasses a wide array of techniques, with electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) having become the established methods for NP quantification; however, these techniques are not always applicable. A new and rapidly developing method that addresses the limitations of these techniques is the electrochemical detection of NPs in solution. The 'nano-impacts' technique is an excellent and qualitative in situ method for nanoparticle characterization. Two complementary studies on silver and silver bromide nanoparticles (NPs) were used to assess the large radius limit of the nano-impact method for NP sizing. Noting that by definition a NP cannot be larger than 100 nm in diameter, we have shown that the method quantitatively sizes at the largest limit, the lower limit having been previously reported as ∼6 nm.1.

No MeSH data available.


Cyclic voltammetry in 0.10 m NaNO3 at 25 mV s−1. Red: Bare GC macroelectrode. Black: GC macroelectrode drop-cast with 400 pmol AgBr suspension.
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fig03: Cyclic voltammetry in 0.10 m NaNO3 at 25 mV s−1. Red: Bare GC macroelectrode. Black: GC macroelectrode drop-cast with 400 pmol AgBr suspension.

Mentions: To first establish the electrochemical behaviour of the synthesised AgBr NPs, stripping voltammetry was conducted on a GC macrodisk. Figure 3 shows a cyclic voltammogram (CV) of drop-cast particles, scanning first reductively then oxidatively. No well-defined AgBr reduction peak is apparent; instead, sharp reductive features (spikes) are observed at potentials lower than −0.75 V vs. a saturated mercury sulfate electrode (MSE). This type of voltammetric response has been previously attributed to a nucleation overpotential required for particle reduction14 and can be associated with reduction of AgBr to Ag:1


Electrochemical Nanoparticle Sizing Via Nano-Impacts: How Large a Nanoparticle Can be Measured?

Bartlett TR, Sokolov SV, Compton RG - ChemistryOpen (2015)

Cyclic voltammetry in 0.10 m NaNO3 at 25 mV s−1. Red: Bare GC macroelectrode. Black: GC macroelectrode drop-cast with 400 pmol AgBr suspension.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4608527&req=5

fig03: Cyclic voltammetry in 0.10 m NaNO3 at 25 mV s−1. Red: Bare GC macroelectrode. Black: GC macroelectrode drop-cast with 400 pmol AgBr suspension.
Mentions: To first establish the electrochemical behaviour of the synthesised AgBr NPs, stripping voltammetry was conducted on a GC macrodisk. Figure 3 shows a cyclic voltammogram (CV) of drop-cast particles, scanning first reductively then oxidatively. No well-defined AgBr reduction peak is apparent; instead, sharp reductive features (spikes) are observed at potentials lower than −0.75 V vs. a saturated mercury sulfate electrode (MSE). This type of voltammetric response has been previously attributed to a nucleation overpotential required for particle reduction14 and can be associated with reduction of AgBr to Ag:1

Bottom Line: The 'nano-impacts' technique is an excellent and qualitative in situ method for nanoparticle characterization.Two complementary studies on silver and silver bromide nanoparticles (NPs) were used to assess the large radius limit of the nano-impact method for NP sizing.Noting that by definition a NP cannot be larger than 100 nm in diameter, we have shown that the method quantitatively sizes at the largest limit, the lower limit having been previously reported as ∼6 nm.1.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford South Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3QZ, UK.

ABSTRACT
The field of nanoparticle (NP) sizing encompasses a wide array of techniques, with electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) having become the established methods for NP quantification; however, these techniques are not always applicable. A new and rapidly developing method that addresses the limitations of these techniques is the electrochemical detection of NPs in solution. The 'nano-impacts' technique is an excellent and qualitative in situ method for nanoparticle characterization. Two complementary studies on silver and silver bromide nanoparticles (NPs) were used to assess the large radius limit of the nano-impact method for NP sizing. Noting that by definition a NP cannot be larger than 100 nm in diameter, we have shown that the method quantitatively sizes at the largest limit, the lower limit having been previously reported as ∼6 nm.1.

No MeSH data available.