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Loss of lysyl oxidase-like 3 causes cleft palate and spinal deformity in mice.

Zhang J, Yang R, Liu Z, Hou C, Zong W, Zhang A, Sun X, Gao J - Hum. Mol. Genet. (2015)

Bottom Line: Failure of any one of these processes can result in embryonic malformation.We found that the obvious decrease of collagen cross-links in palate and spine that was induced by the lack of LOXL3 resulted in cleft palate and spinal deformity.The Loxl3 gene may be a candidate disease gene resulting in cleft palate and spinal deformity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, 27 Shanda Nanlu, Jinan 250100, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mineralization in coronal sections of LOXL3-deficient palatal region by Von Kossa staining at E18.5. Mineralization appeared brown on the sections. (A) Wild-type mice. (B) LOXL3-deficient mice. (C)The mineralization area of palatal region of Loxl3−/− mice was significantly less than that of Loxl3+/+ mice. *P < 0.05. T: tongue; PS: palatal shelves. Bar = 200 μm.
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DDV333F4: Mineralization in coronal sections of LOXL3-deficient palatal region by Von Kossa staining at E18.5. Mineralization appeared brown on the sections. (A) Wild-type mice. (B) LOXL3-deficient mice. (C)The mineralization area of palatal region of Loxl3−/− mice was significantly less than that of Loxl3+/+ mice. *P < 0.05. T: tongue; PS: palatal shelves. Bar = 200 μm.

Mentions: To determine the pattern of mineralization during the formation of the secondary palate, tissue sections from the heads of E18.5 wild-type and mutant embryos were analysed with Von Kossa staining. Wild-type mice demonstrated normal intramembranous and endochondral ossification with mineral deposition in the secondary palate (Fig. 4A). Because the palatal shelves of mutant mice were unfused, the mineralization in the truncated palatal shelves was obviously decreased (P < 0.05, Fig. 4B and C).Figure 4.


Loss of lysyl oxidase-like 3 causes cleft palate and spinal deformity in mice.

Zhang J, Yang R, Liu Z, Hou C, Zong W, Zhang A, Sun X, Gao J - Hum. Mol. Genet. (2015)

Mineralization in coronal sections of LOXL3-deficient palatal region by Von Kossa staining at E18.5. Mineralization appeared brown on the sections. (A) Wild-type mice. (B) LOXL3-deficient mice. (C)The mineralization area of palatal region of Loxl3−/− mice was significantly less than that of Loxl3+/+ mice. *P < 0.05. T: tongue; PS: palatal shelves. Bar = 200 μm.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4599675&req=5

DDV333F4: Mineralization in coronal sections of LOXL3-deficient palatal region by Von Kossa staining at E18.5. Mineralization appeared brown on the sections. (A) Wild-type mice. (B) LOXL3-deficient mice. (C)The mineralization area of palatal region of Loxl3−/− mice was significantly less than that of Loxl3+/+ mice. *P < 0.05. T: tongue; PS: palatal shelves. Bar = 200 μm.
Mentions: To determine the pattern of mineralization during the formation of the secondary palate, tissue sections from the heads of E18.5 wild-type and mutant embryos were analysed with Von Kossa staining. Wild-type mice demonstrated normal intramembranous and endochondral ossification with mineral deposition in the secondary palate (Fig. 4A). Because the palatal shelves of mutant mice were unfused, the mineralization in the truncated palatal shelves was obviously decreased (P < 0.05, Fig. 4B and C).Figure 4.

Bottom Line: Failure of any one of these processes can result in embryonic malformation.We found that the obvious decrease of collagen cross-links in palate and spine that was induced by the lack of LOXL3 resulted in cleft palate and spinal deformity.The Loxl3 gene may be a candidate disease gene resulting in cleft palate and spinal deformity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Developmental Biology, School of Life Science, Shandong University, 27 Shanda Nanlu, Jinan 250100, China.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus