Limits...
Changes in Rat 50-kHz Ultrasonic Vocalizations During Dopamine Denervation and Aging: Relevance to Neurodegeneration.

Johnson AM, Grant LM, Schallert T, Ciucci MR - Curr Neuropharmacol (2015)

Bottom Line: Rat ultrasonic vocalizations provide a unique behavioral model for studying communication deficits and the mechanisms underlying these deficits in these conditions.Although only a small amount of papers were found for each of these topics, results suggest that both shared and unique acoustic deficits in ultrasonic vocalizations exist across conditions and that these acoustic deficits are due to changes in either dopamine signaling or denervation and in aging models changes to the nucleus ambiguus, at the level of the neuromuscular junction, and the composition of the vocal folds in the larynx.We conclude that ultrasonic vocalizations are a useful tool for studying biologic mechanisms underlying vocal communication deficits in neurodegenerative diseases and aging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Aaron M. Johnson, 901 S. 6th St. Champaign, IL 61820. amj3@illinois.edu.

ABSTRACT
Vocal communication is negatively affected by neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease, and by aging. The neurological and sensorimotor mechanisms underlying voice deficits in Parkinson disease and aging are not well-understood. Rat ultrasonic vocalizations provide a unique behavioral model for studying communication deficits and the mechanisms underlying these deficits in these conditions. The purpose of this review was to examine the existing literature for methods using rat ultrasonic vocalization with regard to the primary disease pathology of Parkinson disease, dopamine denervation, and aging. Although only a small amount of papers were found for each of these topics, results suggest that both shared and unique acoustic deficits in ultrasonic vocalizations exist across conditions and that these acoustic deficits are due to changes in either dopamine signaling or denervation and in aging models changes to the nucleus ambiguus, at the level of the neuromuscular junction, and the composition of the vocal folds in the larynx. We conclude that ultrasonic vocalizations are a useful tool for studying biologic mechanisms underlying vocal communication deficits in neurodegenerative diseases and aging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Representative spectrograms of frequency modulated trill-type USVs demonstrating the reduced amplitude and bandwidth inunilateral 6-OHDA infusion (dopamine denervation model of Parkinson disease) male rats compared with control. Averages and standarderrors of the maximum and minimum peak frequency are represented by the bar graphs. Solid color between the maximum and minimumpeak frequency indicates the bandwidth of the call. Reprinted with permission from Ciucci, et al., 2008 [65].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4598432&req=5

Figure 1: Representative spectrograms of frequency modulated trill-type USVs demonstrating the reduced amplitude and bandwidth inunilateral 6-OHDA infusion (dopamine denervation model of Parkinson disease) male rats compared with control. Averages and standarderrors of the maximum and minimum peak frequency are represented by the bar graphs. Solid color between the maximum and minimumpeak frequency indicates the bandwidth of the call. Reprinted with permission from Ciucci, et al., 2008 [65].

Mentions: In our review of the literature, only two papers addressed the effects of unilateral dopamine denervation on 50-kHz vocalizations with 6-OHDA ([63, 64]); no studies were found using other neurotoxin or pesticide/herbicide models. The first study (Ciucci et al., 2007) [63] was preliminary, thus results from the 2009 study are reported here [64]. Using a mating paradigm, the authors elicited 50-kHz USVs in male Long-Evans rats by exposing sexually-experienced males to receptive females. The female rats were removed and recording of vocalizations were from individual males only. USV complexity (trill-like frequency modulated USVs vs. flat USVs) was decreased relative to controls without a decrease in the total number of USVs produced. Amplitude (acoustic intensity measured in decibels) and bandwidth (the frequency range of a vocalization, measured in Hertz as the difference between the highest and lowest frequency) were also significantly reduced compared to controls (for representative spectrogram, see Fig. 1 reprinted with permission from Ciucci, et al., 2008 [65]). Although it has been established in adult USVs that acoustic features, such as number of calls, intensity, and frequency range, carry communicative value, it is unknown how changes in these parameters change the semiotic content and/or the response of the recipient [66]. Based on recent advances in understanding the physiology of USV production [50, 56, 67], however, these acoustic changes suggest that rats, like humans, have decreased control at the level of the larynx with dopamine denervation. However, although denervation with unilateral 6-OHDA infusion alters the acoustic structure of rat USVs, certain features do not change or change to a small degree. We calculated effect sizes from the Ciucci 2009 paper and there was a large effect on amplitude (Cohen’s d 8.0, r=0.97) but a smaller effect on maximum frequency (Cohen’s d=2.6, r=0.79), while there was no statistically significant difference in USV duration.


Changes in Rat 50-kHz Ultrasonic Vocalizations During Dopamine Denervation and Aging: Relevance to Neurodegeneration.

Johnson AM, Grant LM, Schallert T, Ciucci MR - Curr Neuropharmacol (2015)

Representative spectrograms of frequency modulated trill-type USVs demonstrating the reduced amplitude and bandwidth inunilateral 6-OHDA infusion (dopamine denervation model of Parkinson disease) male rats compared with control. Averages and standarderrors of the maximum and minimum peak frequency are represented by the bar graphs. Solid color between the maximum and minimumpeak frequency indicates the bandwidth of the call. Reprinted with permission from Ciucci, et al., 2008 [65].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4598432&req=5

Figure 1: Representative spectrograms of frequency modulated trill-type USVs demonstrating the reduced amplitude and bandwidth inunilateral 6-OHDA infusion (dopamine denervation model of Parkinson disease) male rats compared with control. Averages and standarderrors of the maximum and minimum peak frequency are represented by the bar graphs. Solid color between the maximum and minimumpeak frequency indicates the bandwidth of the call. Reprinted with permission from Ciucci, et al., 2008 [65].
Mentions: In our review of the literature, only two papers addressed the effects of unilateral dopamine denervation on 50-kHz vocalizations with 6-OHDA ([63, 64]); no studies were found using other neurotoxin or pesticide/herbicide models. The first study (Ciucci et al., 2007) [63] was preliminary, thus results from the 2009 study are reported here [64]. Using a mating paradigm, the authors elicited 50-kHz USVs in male Long-Evans rats by exposing sexually-experienced males to receptive females. The female rats were removed and recording of vocalizations were from individual males only. USV complexity (trill-like frequency modulated USVs vs. flat USVs) was decreased relative to controls without a decrease in the total number of USVs produced. Amplitude (acoustic intensity measured in decibels) and bandwidth (the frequency range of a vocalization, measured in Hertz as the difference between the highest and lowest frequency) were also significantly reduced compared to controls (for representative spectrogram, see Fig. 1 reprinted with permission from Ciucci, et al., 2008 [65]). Although it has been established in adult USVs that acoustic features, such as number of calls, intensity, and frequency range, carry communicative value, it is unknown how changes in these parameters change the semiotic content and/or the response of the recipient [66]. Based on recent advances in understanding the physiology of USV production [50, 56, 67], however, these acoustic changes suggest that rats, like humans, have decreased control at the level of the larynx with dopamine denervation. However, although denervation with unilateral 6-OHDA infusion alters the acoustic structure of rat USVs, certain features do not change or change to a small degree. We calculated effect sizes from the Ciucci 2009 paper and there was a large effect on amplitude (Cohen’s d 8.0, r=0.97) but a smaller effect on maximum frequency (Cohen’s d=2.6, r=0.79), while there was no statistically significant difference in USV duration.

Bottom Line: Rat ultrasonic vocalizations provide a unique behavioral model for studying communication deficits and the mechanisms underlying these deficits in these conditions.Although only a small amount of papers were found for each of these topics, results suggest that both shared and unique acoustic deficits in ultrasonic vocalizations exist across conditions and that these acoustic deficits are due to changes in either dopamine signaling or denervation and in aging models changes to the nucleus ambiguus, at the level of the neuromuscular junction, and the composition of the vocal folds in the larynx.We conclude that ultrasonic vocalizations are a useful tool for studying biologic mechanisms underlying vocal communication deficits in neurodegenerative diseases and aging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Aaron M. Johnson, 901 S. 6th St. Champaign, IL 61820. amj3@illinois.edu.

ABSTRACT
Vocal communication is negatively affected by neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson disease, and by aging. The neurological and sensorimotor mechanisms underlying voice deficits in Parkinson disease and aging are not well-understood. Rat ultrasonic vocalizations provide a unique behavioral model for studying communication deficits and the mechanisms underlying these deficits in these conditions. The purpose of this review was to examine the existing literature for methods using rat ultrasonic vocalization with regard to the primary disease pathology of Parkinson disease, dopamine denervation, and aging. Although only a small amount of papers were found for each of these topics, results suggest that both shared and unique acoustic deficits in ultrasonic vocalizations exist across conditions and that these acoustic deficits are due to changes in either dopamine signaling or denervation and in aging models changes to the nucleus ambiguus, at the level of the neuromuscular junction, and the composition of the vocal folds in the larynx. We conclude that ultrasonic vocalizations are a useful tool for studying biologic mechanisms underlying vocal communication deficits in neurodegenerative diseases and aging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus