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Genomics and Evolution in Traditional Medicinal Plants: Road to a Healthier Life.

Hao DC, Xiao PG - Evol. Bioinform. Online (2015)

Bottom Line: Medicinal plants have long been utilized in traditional medicine and ethnomedicine worldwide.The utility of molecular phylogeny and phylogenomics in predicting chemodiversity and bioprospecting is also highlighted within the context of natural-product-based drug discovery and development.Representative case studies of medicinal plant genome, phylogeny, and evolution are summarized to exemplify the expansion of knowledge pedigree and the paradigm shift to the omics-based approaches, which update our awareness about plant genome evolution and enable the molecular breeding of medicinal plants and the sustainable utilization of plant pharmaceutical resources.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biotechnology Institute, School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Dalian Jiaotong University, Dalian, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Medicinal plants have long been utilized in traditional medicine and ethnomedicine worldwide. This review presents a glimpse of the current status of and future trends in medicinal plant genomics, evolution, and phylogeny. These dynamic fields are at the intersection of phytochemistry and plant biology and are concerned with the evolution mechanisms and systematics of medicinal plant genomes, origin and evolution of the plant genotype and metabolic phenotype, interaction between medicinal plant genomes and their environment, the correlation between genomic diversity and metabolite diversity, and so on. Use of the emerging high-end genomic technologies can be expanded from crop plants to traditional medicinal plants, in order to expedite medicinal plant breeding and transform them into living factories of medicinal compounds. The utility of molecular phylogeny and phylogenomics in predicting chemodiversity and bioprospecting is also highlighted within the context of natural-product-based drug discovery and development. Representative case studies of medicinal plant genome, phylogeny, and evolution are summarized to exemplify the expansion of knowledge pedigree and the paradigm shift to the omics-based approaches, which update our awareness about plant genome evolution and enable the molecular breeding of medicinal plants and the sustainable utilization of plant pharmaceutical resources.

No MeSH data available.


Cladogram of the Ranunculaceae tribe Delphinieae, according to Refs 52, 119. Gymnaconitum and Staphisagria were regarded as the subgenus of Aconitum and Delphinium, respectively. Consolida, usually treated as an independent genus, could belong to the genus Delphinium. 19
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f7-ebo-11-2015-197: Cladogram of the Ranunculaceae tribe Delphinieae, according to Refs 52, 119. Gymnaconitum and Staphisagria were regarded as the subgenus of Aconitum and Delphinium, respectively. Consolida, usually treated as an independent genus, could belong to the genus Delphinium. 19

Mentions: Aconitum (Delphinieae, Ranunculaceae) has more than 300 species in the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, over half of which are distributed in China. This genus has two subgenera, Lycoctonum and Aconitum (Fig. 7).48 Southwest China, particularly the Hengduan Mountains, is the most important center of origin and diversity of the genus. Many Aconitum species are used as poisonous and medicinal plants. Their anticancer activity, cardioactive effect, analgesic activity, anti-inflammatory activity, effect on energy metabolism, and antimicrobial and pesticidal activities, which are mainly due to the abundant diterpenoid alkaloids, are well archived.52 The correlation between molecular phylogeny, chemical components, and medicinal uses in Aconitum is notable.52,118 Diterpenoid alkaloids belong to four skeletal types: C18, C19, C20 and bisditerpenoid alkaloids. The subgenus Lycoctonum contains mainly C18 (lappaconine-type and ranaconine-type) and C19 (lycoctonine-type). Roots of the Lycoctonum plants exhibit relatively low toxicity and have been used to combat rheumatism, pains, irregular menstruation, and so on. This subgenus is worth a more detailed phytochemical investigation for new lead discovery and development. The Chinese taxa of section Aconitum (predominant in subgen. Aconitum) are morphologically divided into 11 series.


Genomics and Evolution in Traditional Medicinal Plants: Road to a Healthier Life.

Hao DC, Xiao PG - Evol. Bioinform. Online (2015)

Cladogram of the Ranunculaceae tribe Delphinieae, according to Refs 52, 119. Gymnaconitum and Staphisagria were regarded as the subgenus of Aconitum and Delphinium, respectively. Consolida, usually treated as an independent genus, could belong to the genus Delphinium. 19
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4597484&req=5

f7-ebo-11-2015-197: Cladogram of the Ranunculaceae tribe Delphinieae, according to Refs 52, 119. Gymnaconitum and Staphisagria were regarded as the subgenus of Aconitum and Delphinium, respectively. Consolida, usually treated as an independent genus, could belong to the genus Delphinium. 19
Mentions: Aconitum (Delphinieae, Ranunculaceae) has more than 300 species in the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, over half of which are distributed in China. This genus has two subgenera, Lycoctonum and Aconitum (Fig. 7).48 Southwest China, particularly the Hengduan Mountains, is the most important center of origin and diversity of the genus. Many Aconitum species are used as poisonous and medicinal plants. Their anticancer activity, cardioactive effect, analgesic activity, anti-inflammatory activity, effect on energy metabolism, and antimicrobial and pesticidal activities, which are mainly due to the abundant diterpenoid alkaloids, are well archived.52 The correlation between molecular phylogeny, chemical components, and medicinal uses in Aconitum is notable.52,118 Diterpenoid alkaloids belong to four skeletal types: C18, C19, C20 and bisditerpenoid alkaloids. The subgenus Lycoctonum contains mainly C18 (lappaconine-type and ranaconine-type) and C19 (lycoctonine-type). Roots of the Lycoctonum plants exhibit relatively low toxicity and have been used to combat rheumatism, pains, irregular menstruation, and so on. This subgenus is worth a more detailed phytochemical investigation for new lead discovery and development. The Chinese taxa of section Aconitum (predominant in subgen. Aconitum) are morphologically divided into 11 series.

Bottom Line: Medicinal plants have long been utilized in traditional medicine and ethnomedicine worldwide.The utility of molecular phylogeny and phylogenomics in predicting chemodiversity and bioprospecting is also highlighted within the context of natural-product-based drug discovery and development.Representative case studies of medicinal plant genome, phylogeny, and evolution are summarized to exemplify the expansion of knowledge pedigree and the paradigm shift to the omics-based approaches, which update our awareness about plant genome evolution and enable the molecular breeding of medicinal plants and the sustainable utilization of plant pharmaceutical resources.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biotechnology Institute, School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Dalian Jiaotong University, Dalian, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Medicinal plants have long been utilized in traditional medicine and ethnomedicine worldwide. This review presents a glimpse of the current status of and future trends in medicinal plant genomics, evolution, and phylogeny. These dynamic fields are at the intersection of phytochemistry and plant biology and are concerned with the evolution mechanisms and systematics of medicinal plant genomes, origin and evolution of the plant genotype and metabolic phenotype, interaction between medicinal plant genomes and their environment, the correlation between genomic diversity and metabolite diversity, and so on. Use of the emerging high-end genomic technologies can be expanded from crop plants to traditional medicinal plants, in order to expedite medicinal plant breeding and transform them into living factories of medicinal compounds. The utility of molecular phylogeny and phylogenomics in predicting chemodiversity and bioprospecting is also highlighted within the context of natural-product-based drug discovery and development. Representative case studies of medicinal plant genome, phylogeny, and evolution are summarized to exemplify the expansion of knowledge pedigree and the paradigm shift to the omics-based approaches, which update our awareness about plant genome evolution and enable the molecular breeding of medicinal plants and the sustainable utilization of plant pharmaceutical resources.

No MeSH data available.