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The hand of Homo naledi.

Kivell TL, Deane AS, Tocheri MW, Orr CM, Schmid P, Hawks J, Berger LR, Churchill SE - Nat Commun (2015)

Bottom Line: Based on associated hominin material, the bones of this hand are attributed to Homo naledi.However, the finger bones are longer and more curved than in most australopiths, indicating frequent use of the hand during life for strong grasping during locomotor climbing and suspension.These markedly curved digits in combination with an otherwise human-like wrist and palm indicate a significant degree of climbing, despite the derived nature of many aspects of the hand and other regions of the postcranial skeleton in H. naledi.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Postcranial Evolution Lab, Skeletal Biology Research Centre, School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent, Marlowe Building, Canterbury CT2 7NR, UK.

ABSTRACT
A nearly complete right hand of an adult hominin was recovered from the Rising Star cave system, South Africa. Based on associated hominin material, the bones of this hand are attributed to Homo naledi. This hand reveals a long, robust thumb and derived wrist morphology that is shared with Neandertals and modern humans, and considered adaptive for intensified manual manipulation. However, the finger bones are longer and more curved than in most australopiths, indicating frequent use of the hand during life for strong grasping during locomotor climbing and suspension. These markedly curved digits in combination with an otherwise human-like wrist and palm indicate a significant degree of climbing, despite the derived nature of many aspects of the hand and other regions of the postcranial skeleton in H. naledi.

No MeSH data available.


H. naledi Hand 1 wrist bones.The associated carpal bones of Hand 1, showing (from top to bottom) the scaphoid, lunate, triquetrum, trapezium, trapezoid, capitate and hamate in standard anatomical views. The trapezium is shown in proximomedial view to depict the trapezoid and scaphoid facets, and the trapezoid is shown in distolateral view to demonstrate the distinctive modern human-like ‘boot-shape'. All bones to scale.
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f4: H. naledi Hand 1 wrist bones.The associated carpal bones of Hand 1, showing (from top to bottom) the scaphoid, lunate, triquetrum, trapezium, trapezoid, capitate and hamate in standard anatomical views. The trapezium is shown in proximomedial view to depict the trapezoid and scaphoid facets, and the trapezoid is shown in distolateral view to demonstrate the distinctive modern human-like ‘boot-shape'. All bones to scale.

Mentions: In this context, the almost complete right wrist of Hand 1 provides a rare opportunity to examine this suite of carpal features in its entirety from a single fossil hominin individual (Figs 1 and 4). Comparative three-dimensional (3D) morphometric analyses of the scaphoid, trapezium and trapezoid (Fig. 5a and Supplementary Table 3a), and the capitate and hamate (Fig. 5b and Supplementary Table 3b) demonstrate that H. naledi wrist shape and articular configuration fall well within the ranges of variation seen in modern humans and Neandertals, and are thus derived relative to extant great apes, australopiths and H. floresiensis. Hand 1 and several other isolated carpal bones (Supplementary Table 1) have a relatively flat trapeziometacarpal joint, a facet for the trapezium that extends onto the scaphoid tubercle, an enlarged and palmarly expanded trapezoid–capitate joint and a boot-shaped trapezoid with an expanded palmar non-articular surface that probably repositions the thumb into a more supinated position compared with australopiths, OH7 and H. floresiensis3133. Although the tubercle of the trapezium and the hamulus of the hamate are robust, both fall within the range of variation documented in modern humans and Neandertals (Fig. 4 and Supplementary Fig. 2).


The hand of Homo naledi.

Kivell TL, Deane AS, Tocheri MW, Orr CM, Schmid P, Hawks J, Berger LR, Churchill SE - Nat Commun (2015)

H. naledi Hand 1 wrist bones.The associated carpal bones of Hand 1, showing (from top to bottom) the scaphoid, lunate, triquetrum, trapezium, trapezoid, capitate and hamate in standard anatomical views. The trapezium is shown in proximomedial view to depict the trapezoid and scaphoid facets, and the trapezoid is shown in distolateral view to demonstrate the distinctive modern human-like ‘boot-shape'. All bones to scale.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4597335&req=5

f4: H. naledi Hand 1 wrist bones.The associated carpal bones of Hand 1, showing (from top to bottom) the scaphoid, lunate, triquetrum, trapezium, trapezoid, capitate and hamate in standard anatomical views. The trapezium is shown in proximomedial view to depict the trapezoid and scaphoid facets, and the trapezoid is shown in distolateral view to demonstrate the distinctive modern human-like ‘boot-shape'. All bones to scale.
Mentions: In this context, the almost complete right wrist of Hand 1 provides a rare opportunity to examine this suite of carpal features in its entirety from a single fossil hominin individual (Figs 1 and 4). Comparative three-dimensional (3D) morphometric analyses of the scaphoid, trapezium and trapezoid (Fig. 5a and Supplementary Table 3a), and the capitate and hamate (Fig. 5b and Supplementary Table 3b) demonstrate that H. naledi wrist shape and articular configuration fall well within the ranges of variation seen in modern humans and Neandertals, and are thus derived relative to extant great apes, australopiths and H. floresiensis. Hand 1 and several other isolated carpal bones (Supplementary Table 1) have a relatively flat trapeziometacarpal joint, a facet for the trapezium that extends onto the scaphoid tubercle, an enlarged and palmarly expanded trapezoid–capitate joint and a boot-shaped trapezoid with an expanded palmar non-articular surface that probably repositions the thumb into a more supinated position compared with australopiths, OH7 and H. floresiensis3133. Although the tubercle of the trapezium and the hamulus of the hamate are robust, both fall within the range of variation documented in modern humans and Neandertals (Fig. 4 and Supplementary Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Based on associated hominin material, the bones of this hand are attributed to Homo naledi.However, the finger bones are longer and more curved than in most australopiths, indicating frequent use of the hand during life for strong grasping during locomotor climbing and suspension.These markedly curved digits in combination with an otherwise human-like wrist and palm indicate a significant degree of climbing, despite the derived nature of many aspects of the hand and other regions of the postcranial skeleton in H. naledi.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal Postcranial Evolution Lab, Skeletal Biology Research Centre, School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent, Marlowe Building, Canterbury CT2 7NR, UK.

ABSTRACT
A nearly complete right hand of an adult hominin was recovered from the Rising Star cave system, South Africa. Based on associated hominin material, the bones of this hand are attributed to Homo naledi. This hand reveals a long, robust thumb and derived wrist morphology that is shared with Neandertals and modern humans, and considered adaptive for intensified manual manipulation. However, the finger bones are longer and more curved than in most australopiths, indicating frequent use of the hand during life for strong grasping during locomotor climbing and suspension. These markedly curved digits in combination with an otherwise human-like wrist and palm indicate a significant degree of climbing, despite the derived nature of many aspects of the hand and other regions of the postcranial skeleton in H. naledi.

No MeSH data available.