Limits...
Surgical Skills Beyond Scientific Management.

Whitfield N - Med Hist (2015)

Bottom Line: During the Great War, the French surgeon Alexis Carrel, in collaboration with the English chemist Henry Dakin, devised an antiseptic treatment for infected wounds.This paper focuses on Carrel's attempt to standardise knowledge of infected wounds and their treatment, and looks closely at the vision of surgical skill he espoused and its difference from those associated with the doctrines of scientific management.Examining contemporary claims that the Carrel-Dakin method increased rather than diminished demands on surgical work, this paper further shows how debates about antiseptic wound treatment opened up a critical space for considering the nature of skill as a vital dynamic in surgical innovation and practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
During the Great War, the French surgeon Alexis Carrel, in collaboration with the English chemist Henry Dakin, devised an antiseptic treatment for infected wounds. This paper focuses on Carrel's attempt to standardise knowledge of infected wounds and their treatment, and looks closely at the vision of surgical skill he espoused and its difference from those associated with the doctrines of scientific management. Examining contemporary claims that the Carrel-Dakin method increased rather than diminished demands on surgical work, this paper further shows how debates about antiseptic wound treatment opened up a critical space for considering the nature of skill as a vital dynamic in surgical innovation and practice.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

The War Demonstration Hospital in New York City. Picture courtesy of the RockefellerArchive Center, Rockefeller University Collection, Record Group 1, Series 600-2 ‘TheWar Demonstration Hospital’, Box 15, Folder 10.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4597249&req=5

f3: The War Demonstration Hospital in New York City. Picture courtesy of the RockefellerArchive Center, Rockefeller University Collection, Record Group 1, Series 600-2 ‘TheWar Demonstration Hospital’, Box 15, Folder 10.

Mentions: In the spring of 1917, following Carrel’s insistence that the work of Compèigne was nearingan end, Simon Flexner proposed the construction of a 100-bed War Demonstration Hospital onthe grounds of the Rockefeller Institute in Manhattan (see Figure 3). Designed as a movable wartime hospital, its establishment was rapid.Construction began on 1 June and staff admitted the first patient on 26 July.106 The hospital served three principlefunctions: to make available to civilian and military patients the Carrel–Dakin treatment;to demonstrate and teach the method to American civil and military surgeons and nurses; andto test the feasibility of a portable military hospital unit modelled on those on theWestern Front.107 As well as itspedagogical and clinical features, the hospital included a large laboratory space(unlike Western Front hospitals), for research into the chemicalcomponent of the treatment.108Instruction covered four areas in two-week courses that ran from July 1917 to March 1919: asurgical course, a chemistry course, a laboratory course and a course on specialinstruction.109 Over 800 surgeonsattended, many of whom kept up correspondence with hospital staff to report successes anddifficulties, or to enquire about the availability of equipment and solutions. After severalmonths of teaching, Carrel concluded the following:


Surgical Skills Beyond Scientific Management.

Whitfield N - Med Hist (2015)

The War Demonstration Hospital in New York City. Picture courtesy of the RockefellerArchive Center, Rockefeller University Collection, Record Group 1, Series 600-2 ‘TheWar Demonstration Hospital’, Box 15, Folder 10.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4597249&req=5

f3: The War Demonstration Hospital in New York City. Picture courtesy of the RockefellerArchive Center, Rockefeller University Collection, Record Group 1, Series 600-2 ‘TheWar Demonstration Hospital’, Box 15, Folder 10.
Mentions: In the spring of 1917, following Carrel’s insistence that the work of Compèigne was nearingan end, Simon Flexner proposed the construction of a 100-bed War Demonstration Hospital onthe grounds of the Rockefeller Institute in Manhattan (see Figure 3). Designed as a movable wartime hospital, its establishment was rapid.Construction began on 1 June and staff admitted the first patient on 26 July.106 The hospital served three principlefunctions: to make available to civilian and military patients the Carrel–Dakin treatment;to demonstrate and teach the method to American civil and military surgeons and nurses; andto test the feasibility of a portable military hospital unit modelled on those on theWestern Front.107 As well as itspedagogical and clinical features, the hospital included a large laboratory space(unlike Western Front hospitals), for research into the chemicalcomponent of the treatment.108Instruction covered four areas in two-week courses that ran from July 1917 to March 1919: asurgical course, a chemistry course, a laboratory course and a course on specialinstruction.109 Over 800 surgeonsattended, many of whom kept up correspondence with hospital staff to report successes anddifficulties, or to enquire about the availability of equipment and solutions. After severalmonths of teaching, Carrel concluded the following:

Bottom Line: During the Great War, the French surgeon Alexis Carrel, in collaboration with the English chemist Henry Dakin, devised an antiseptic treatment for infected wounds.This paper focuses on Carrel's attempt to standardise knowledge of infected wounds and their treatment, and looks closely at the vision of surgical skill he espoused and its difference from those associated with the doctrines of scientific management.Examining contemporary claims that the Carrel-Dakin method increased rather than diminished demands on surgical work, this paper further shows how debates about antiseptic wound treatment opened up a critical space for considering the nature of skill as a vital dynamic in surgical innovation and practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
During the Great War, the French surgeon Alexis Carrel, in collaboration with the English chemist Henry Dakin, devised an antiseptic treatment for infected wounds. This paper focuses on Carrel's attempt to standardise knowledge of infected wounds and their treatment, and looks closely at the vision of surgical skill he espoused and its difference from those associated with the doctrines of scientific management. Examining contemporary claims that the Carrel-Dakin method increased rather than diminished demands on surgical work, this paper further shows how debates about antiseptic wound treatment opened up a critical space for considering the nature of skill as a vital dynamic in surgical innovation and practice.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus