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The Costs and Benefits of Employing an Adult with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review.

Jacob A, Scott M, Falkmer M, Falkmer T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Employment is not only an entitlement enjoyed by others in society, but employing adults with ASD also has economic benefits by decreasing lost productivity and resource costs for this group.Providing supported employment services for adults with ASD does not only cut the cost compared with providing standard care, it also results in better outcomes for adults with ASD.The current systematic review uncovered the fact that very few studies have examined the benefits, the costs and the cost-benefit ratio of employing an adult with ASD from the perspective of employers indicating a need for this topic to be further explored.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite an ambition from adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to be employed, there are limited opportunities for competitive employment for this group. Employment is not only an entitlement enjoyed by others in society, but employing adults with ASD also has economic benefits by decreasing lost productivity and resource costs for this group. Few studies have explored the cost-benefit ratio for employing adults with ASD and even fewer have taken the viewpoint of the employer, particularly applying this situation to ASD. Until such study occurs, employers may continue to be reluctant to employ adults from this group.

Objective: This review aimed to examine the costs, benefits and the cost-benefit ratio of employing adults with ASD, from a societal perspective and from the perspective of employers.

Methods: Eight databases were searched for scientific studies within defined inclusion criteria. These databases included CINAHL Plus, Cochrane Library, Emerald, Ovid Medline, ProQuest, PsycINFO, Scopus and Web of Science.

Results and conclusion: Enhancing the opportunities for adults with ASD to join the workforce is beneficial from a societal perspective, not only from an inclusiveness viewpoint, but also from a strict economic standpoint. Providing supported employment services for adults with ASD does not only cut the cost compared with providing standard care, it also results in better outcomes for adults with ASD. Despite the fact that ASD was the most expensive group to provide vocational rehabilitation services for, adults with ASD have a strong chance of becoming employed once appropriate measures are in place. Hence, rehabilitation services could be considered as a worthwhile investment. The current systematic review uncovered the fact that very few studies have examined the benefits, the costs and the cost-benefit ratio of employing an adult with ASD from the perspective of employers indicating a need for this topic to be further explored.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow Diagram for Selection of Studies
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4596848&req=5

pone.0139896.g001: Flow Diagram for Selection of Studies

Mentions: After searching electronic databases, 2,597 titles were found. After filtering ofthe titles and abstracts, 2,511 were excluded leaving 86 articles. Duplicates articles (56) were removed as well as five grey literature articles. The remaining 25 articles were then retrieved in full. Fourteen articles were excluded after full paper review as they did not fulfil the inclusion criteria, leaving 11 articles. The reference lists of these articles were then manually examined for suitable studies, with none being identified. The Kmet Form was then used to rate the remaining 11 articles to determine their methodological quality. This process is displayed in Fig 1.


The Costs and Benefits of Employing an Adult with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review.

Jacob A, Scott M, Falkmer M, Falkmer T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Flow Diagram for Selection of Studies
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4596848&req=5

pone.0139896.g001: Flow Diagram for Selection of Studies
Mentions: After searching electronic databases, 2,597 titles were found. After filtering ofthe titles and abstracts, 2,511 were excluded leaving 86 articles. Duplicates articles (56) were removed as well as five grey literature articles. The remaining 25 articles were then retrieved in full. Fourteen articles were excluded after full paper review as they did not fulfil the inclusion criteria, leaving 11 articles. The reference lists of these articles were then manually examined for suitable studies, with none being identified. The Kmet Form was then used to rate the remaining 11 articles to determine their methodological quality. This process is displayed in Fig 1.

Bottom Line: Employment is not only an entitlement enjoyed by others in society, but employing adults with ASD also has economic benefits by decreasing lost productivity and resource costs for this group.Providing supported employment services for adults with ASD does not only cut the cost compared with providing standard care, it also results in better outcomes for adults with ASD.The current systematic review uncovered the fact that very few studies have examined the benefits, the costs and the cost-benefit ratio of employing an adult with ASD from the perspective of employers indicating a need for this topic to be further explored.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Occupational Therapy & Social Work, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite an ambition from adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) to be employed, there are limited opportunities for competitive employment for this group. Employment is not only an entitlement enjoyed by others in society, but employing adults with ASD also has economic benefits by decreasing lost productivity and resource costs for this group. Few studies have explored the cost-benefit ratio for employing adults with ASD and even fewer have taken the viewpoint of the employer, particularly applying this situation to ASD. Until such study occurs, employers may continue to be reluctant to employ adults from this group.

Objective: This review aimed to examine the costs, benefits and the cost-benefit ratio of employing adults with ASD, from a societal perspective and from the perspective of employers.

Methods: Eight databases were searched for scientific studies within defined inclusion criteria. These databases included CINAHL Plus, Cochrane Library, Emerald, Ovid Medline, ProQuest, PsycINFO, Scopus and Web of Science.

Results and conclusion: Enhancing the opportunities for adults with ASD to join the workforce is beneficial from a societal perspective, not only from an inclusiveness viewpoint, but also from a strict economic standpoint. Providing supported employment services for adults with ASD does not only cut the cost compared with providing standard care, it also results in better outcomes for adults with ASD. Despite the fact that ASD was the most expensive group to provide vocational rehabilitation services for, adults with ASD have a strong chance of becoming employed once appropriate measures are in place. Hence, rehabilitation services could be considered as a worthwhile investment. The current systematic review uncovered the fact that very few studies have examined the benefits, the costs and the cost-benefit ratio of employing an adult with ASD from the perspective of employers indicating a need for this topic to be further explored.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus