Limits...
Prognostic Role of Serum Levels of Uric Acid in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

Oh SI, Baek S, Park JS, Piao L, Oh KW, Kim SH - J Clin Neurol (2015)

Bottom Line: It has been suggested that oxidative stress is one of the pathomechanisms underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and thus antioxidants such as uric acid (UA) that could reduce oxidative stress might be beneficial in the prevention or treatment of this disease.Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that a better survival rate was more strongly correlated with top-tertile levels of serum UA than with bottom-tertile levels (log-rank test: p=0.035).ALS patients had lower serum UA levels than did healthy individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: It has been suggested that oxidative stress is one of the pathomechanisms underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and thus antioxidants such as uric acid (UA) that could reduce oxidative stress might be beneficial in the prevention or treatment of this disease. The objective of this study was to prospectively investigate serum UA levels in Korean ALS patients and to relate them to disease progression.

Methods: ALS patients and healthy controls who were individually well-matched for sex, age, and body mass index (BMI) underwent blood testing for serum UA levels, and analyzed whether UA levels were correlated with the disease status of the patients, as defined by the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R).

Results: The study included 136 ALS patients and 136 matched controls. The UA level was lower in the ALS patients (4.50±1.17 mg/dL, mean±SD) than in the controls (5.51±1.22 mg/dL; p<0.001). Among the ALS patients, the level of UA acid was inversely correlated with the rate of disease progression (decrease in ALSFRS-R score). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that a better survival rate was more strongly correlated with top-tertile levels of serum UA than with bottom-tertile levels (log-rank test: p=0.035).

Conclusions: ALS patients had lower serum UA levels than did healthy individuals. UA levels in ALS were negatively correlated with the rate of disease progression and positively associated with survival, suggesting that UA levels contribute to the progression of ALS. UA levels could be considered a biomarker of disease progression in the early phase in ALS patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan-Meier survival curves using stratified serum UA levels. The tertile ranges of serum UA levels differed with sex. The tertile ranges were classified as <4.7, 4.7-5.4, and >5.4 mg/dL in male subjects, and as <3.7, 3.7-4.4, and >4.4 mg/dL in female subjects. The survival curves demonstrate a relationship between the serum UA level and survival rate in the total population. UA: uric acid.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4596112&req=5

Figure 2: Kaplan-Meier survival curves using stratified serum UA levels. The tertile ranges of serum UA levels differed with sex. The tertile ranges were classified as <4.7, 4.7-5.4, and >5.4 mg/dL in male subjects, and as <3.7, 3.7-4.4, and >4.4 mg/dL in female subjects. The survival curves demonstrate a relationship between the serum UA level and survival rate in the total population. UA: uric acid.

Mentions: According to our survival analysis of males and females combined in a single model, there was a dose-dependent survival advantage for top-tertile serum UA levels compared to bottom-tertile serum UA levels (log-rank test: p=0.035) (Fig. 2). The mean (SE) survival times in the bottom, middle, and top tertiles were 17.9 (1.6), 21.2 (1.8), and 31.0 (3.4) months, respectively. After separation into male and female groups, the mean survival time did not significantly differ between the top and bottom tertiles among the males [31.4 (5.2) vs. 17.0 (2.3) months, p=0.057] or the females [26.7 (3.2) vs. 17.2 (1.9) months, p=0.218].


Prognostic Role of Serum Levels of Uric Acid in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

Oh SI, Baek S, Park JS, Piao L, Oh KW, Kim SH - J Clin Neurol (2015)

Kaplan-Meier survival curves using stratified serum UA levels. The tertile ranges of serum UA levels differed with sex. The tertile ranges were classified as <4.7, 4.7-5.4, and >5.4 mg/dL in male subjects, and as <3.7, 3.7-4.4, and >4.4 mg/dL in female subjects. The survival curves demonstrate a relationship between the serum UA level and survival rate in the total population. UA: uric acid.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4596112&req=5

Figure 2: Kaplan-Meier survival curves using stratified serum UA levels. The tertile ranges of serum UA levels differed with sex. The tertile ranges were classified as <4.7, 4.7-5.4, and >5.4 mg/dL in male subjects, and as <3.7, 3.7-4.4, and >4.4 mg/dL in female subjects. The survival curves demonstrate a relationship between the serum UA level and survival rate in the total population. UA: uric acid.
Mentions: According to our survival analysis of males and females combined in a single model, there was a dose-dependent survival advantage for top-tertile serum UA levels compared to bottom-tertile serum UA levels (log-rank test: p=0.035) (Fig. 2). The mean (SE) survival times in the bottom, middle, and top tertiles were 17.9 (1.6), 21.2 (1.8), and 31.0 (3.4) months, respectively. After separation into male and female groups, the mean survival time did not significantly differ between the top and bottom tertiles among the males [31.4 (5.2) vs. 17.0 (2.3) months, p=0.057] or the females [26.7 (3.2) vs. 17.2 (1.9) months, p=0.218].

Bottom Line: It has been suggested that oxidative stress is one of the pathomechanisms underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and thus antioxidants such as uric acid (UA) that could reduce oxidative stress might be beneficial in the prevention or treatment of this disease.Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that a better survival rate was more strongly correlated with top-tertile levels of serum UA than with bottom-tertile levels (log-rank test: p=0.035).ALS patients had lower serum UA levels than did healthy individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: It has been suggested that oxidative stress is one of the pathomechanisms underlying amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and thus antioxidants such as uric acid (UA) that could reduce oxidative stress might be beneficial in the prevention or treatment of this disease. The objective of this study was to prospectively investigate serum UA levels in Korean ALS patients and to relate them to disease progression.

Methods: ALS patients and healthy controls who were individually well-matched for sex, age, and body mass index (BMI) underwent blood testing for serum UA levels, and analyzed whether UA levels were correlated with the disease status of the patients, as defined by the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R).

Results: The study included 136 ALS patients and 136 matched controls. The UA level was lower in the ALS patients (4.50±1.17 mg/dL, mean±SD) than in the controls (5.51±1.22 mg/dL; p<0.001). Among the ALS patients, the level of UA acid was inversely correlated with the rate of disease progression (decrease in ALSFRS-R score). Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed that a better survival rate was more strongly correlated with top-tertile levels of serum UA than with bottom-tertile levels (log-rank test: p=0.035).

Conclusions: ALS patients had lower serum UA levels than did healthy individuals. UA levels in ALS were negatively correlated with the rate of disease progression and positively associated with survival, suggesting that UA levels contribute to the progression of ALS. UA levels could be considered a biomarker of disease progression in the early phase in ALS patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus