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A Novel Point-of-Care BioNanoSensor for Rapid HIV Detection and Treatment Monitoring.

Rozmyslowicz T, deSa J, Lec R, Gaulton GN - J AIDS Clin Res (2015)

Bottom Line: The detection range of the BNS device for the biomarker gp120 displayed a low-end sensitivity of 6.5×10(4) HIV viral particles/ml, while using a small fluid sample (5 µl) and with a reaction time of less then 30 seconds.Performance of this device indicated that the BNS has utility for direct detection of HIV particles prior to, and independent from, antibody formation.The BNS parameters of small sample volume, compact device size, and detection sensitivity indicate that the BNS is potentially useful in the point-of-care and/or home setting for monitoring decisions regarding HIV treatment on a real-time basis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA.

ABSTRACT

We report here a new diagnostic approach to the direct detection of HIV in blood or other body fluids that is rapid, sensitive and potentially applicable in a point-of-care setting. The approach follows on the development of a novel BioNanoSensor (BNS) device that utilizes piezoelectric technology to detect the presence of the HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 in a nanoscale format. The detection range of the BNS device for the biomarker gp120 displayed a low-end sensitivity of 6.5×10(4) HIV viral particles/ml, while using a small fluid sample (5 µl) and with a reaction time of less then 30 seconds. Performance of this device indicated that the BNS has utility for direct detection of HIV particles prior to, and independent from, antibody formation. Accordingly, this device holds utility to monitor the status of HIV infection both early after exposure to virus as well as during chronic HIV infection. The BNS parameters of small sample volume, compact device size, and detection sensitivity indicate that the BNS is potentially useful in the point-of-care and/or home setting for monitoring decisions regarding HIV treatment on a real-time basis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

BNS resonant frequency change in response to HIV: gp120 positive NL43/R3Aenv virus and gp120 negative NL43 virus.
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Figure 3: BNS resonant frequency change in response to HIV: gp120 positive NL43/R3Aenv virus and gp120 negative NL43 virus.

Mentions: As a prime goal for a portable BNS sensor is the direct measurement of virus in blood or body fluids, we next analyzed the capacity of the BNS device to detect intact HIV-1 virions using gp120 as the binding vehicle. To simultaneously control for the specificity of gp120 binding on whole virus we contrasted BNS responses to the presence of two forms of HIV-1 - pseudotyped with or without gp120. The backbone of these viruses is HIV-1 NL43, which is modified to be genetically defective for both Env and Vpr gene function. The negative control for the experiment was thus, naïve NL43 virus lacking Env gp120; whereas, the test sample was NL43 virus pseudotyped with gp120 Env isolated from the HIV strain R3A [40]. Assays to measure the BNS response to NL43 virus and the NL43/R3Aenv pseudotyped virus (each at 78ng/ml) were conducted as described above, using again sensors coated with polyclonal anti-gp120. Results for the detection of gp120 are shown in Figure 3. All experiments were run in triplicate, the average and standard deviation of which is plotted. A significant shift in the resonance frequency was consistently seen with the gp120 positive pseudotyped NL43/R3Aenv virus as contrasted to gp120 negative NL43.


A Novel Point-of-Care BioNanoSensor for Rapid HIV Detection and Treatment Monitoring.

Rozmyslowicz T, deSa J, Lec R, Gaulton GN - J AIDS Clin Res (2015)

BNS resonant frequency change in response to HIV: gp120 positive NL43/R3Aenv virus and gp120 negative NL43 virus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4596080&req=5

Figure 3: BNS resonant frequency change in response to HIV: gp120 positive NL43/R3Aenv virus and gp120 negative NL43 virus.
Mentions: As a prime goal for a portable BNS sensor is the direct measurement of virus in blood or body fluids, we next analyzed the capacity of the BNS device to detect intact HIV-1 virions using gp120 as the binding vehicle. To simultaneously control for the specificity of gp120 binding on whole virus we contrasted BNS responses to the presence of two forms of HIV-1 - pseudotyped with or without gp120. The backbone of these viruses is HIV-1 NL43, which is modified to be genetically defective for both Env and Vpr gene function. The negative control for the experiment was thus, naïve NL43 virus lacking Env gp120; whereas, the test sample was NL43 virus pseudotyped with gp120 Env isolated from the HIV strain R3A [40]. Assays to measure the BNS response to NL43 virus and the NL43/R3Aenv pseudotyped virus (each at 78ng/ml) were conducted as described above, using again sensors coated with polyclonal anti-gp120. Results for the detection of gp120 are shown in Figure 3. All experiments were run in triplicate, the average and standard deviation of which is plotted. A significant shift in the resonance frequency was consistently seen with the gp120 positive pseudotyped NL43/R3Aenv virus as contrasted to gp120 negative NL43.

Bottom Line: The detection range of the BNS device for the biomarker gp120 displayed a low-end sensitivity of 6.5×10(4) HIV viral particles/ml, while using a small fluid sample (5 µl) and with a reaction time of less then 30 seconds.Performance of this device indicated that the BNS has utility for direct detection of HIV particles prior to, and independent from, antibody formation.The BNS parameters of small sample volume, compact device size, and detection sensitivity indicate that the BNS is potentially useful in the point-of-care and/or home setting for monitoring decisions regarding HIV treatment on a real-time basis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, USA.

ABSTRACT

We report here a new diagnostic approach to the direct detection of HIV in blood or other body fluids that is rapid, sensitive and potentially applicable in a point-of-care setting. The approach follows on the development of a novel BioNanoSensor (BNS) device that utilizes piezoelectric technology to detect the presence of the HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 in a nanoscale format. The detection range of the BNS device for the biomarker gp120 displayed a low-end sensitivity of 6.5×10(4) HIV viral particles/ml, while using a small fluid sample (5 µl) and with a reaction time of less then 30 seconds. Performance of this device indicated that the BNS has utility for direct detection of HIV particles prior to, and independent from, antibody formation. Accordingly, this device holds utility to monitor the status of HIV infection both early after exposure to virus as well as during chronic HIV infection. The BNS parameters of small sample volume, compact device size, and detection sensitivity indicate that the BNS is potentially useful in the point-of-care and/or home setting for monitoring decisions regarding HIV treatment on a real-time basis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus