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Imaging the spontaneous obliteration of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation using c-arm cone beam computed tomography: A case report.

Braileanu M, Yang W, Caplan JM, Huang J - Surg Neurol Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Spontaneous occlusion of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) without treatment is a rare occurrence.In this case, CBCT provided high resolution imaging of the AVM.Future clinical use of CBCT as an adjunct to DSA may enhance the diagnostic and therapeutic imaging of vascular lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Spontaneous occlusion of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) without treatment is a rare occurrence.

Case description: We report the case of a 56-year-old male who presented with aphasia and right hemiparesis secondary to intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage. Diagnostic digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and c-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) demonstrated a 5 mm Spetzler-Martin Grade III left thalamic AVM drained by the internal cerebral vein. Subsequent DSA and CBCT studies confirmed the spontaneous obliteration of the AVM.

Conclusions: In this case, CBCT provided high resolution imaging of the AVM. Future clinical use of CBCT as an adjunct to DSA may enhance the diagnostic and therapeutic imaging of vascular lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The arteriovenous malformation (AVM) nidus (arrowhead), seen on lateral digital subtraction angiography (a, b and c) and three-dimensional sagittal (d) and coronal (e and f) cone beam computed tomography reconstructions (left carotid injections), is fed by the left anterior choroidal artery (hollow arrow) and a thalamic perforator branch of the left posterior communicating artery (right vertebral injection, not shown), and drained by the left internal cerebral vein (solid arrow). (a) Hematoma obscures the nidus at presentation, (b, d and e) 3 months follow-up reveals the AVM, and (c and f) 7 months follow-up demonstrates complete spontaneous AVM obliteration
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Figure 2: The arteriovenous malformation (AVM) nidus (arrowhead), seen on lateral digital subtraction angiography (a, b and c) and three-dimensional sagittal (d) and coronal (e and f) cone beam computed tomography reconstructions (left carotid injections), is fed by the left anterior choroidal artery (hollow arrow) and a thalamic perforator branch of the left posterior communicating artery (right vertebral injection, not shown), and drained by the left internal cerebral vein (solid arrow). (a) Hematoma obscures the nidus at presentation, (b, d and e) 3 months follow-up reveals the AVM, and (c and f) 7 months follow-up demonstrates complete spontaneous AVM obliteration

Mentions: A 56-year-old male initially presented with aphasia and right hemiparesis. Head CT, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a left thalamic intracerebral hemorrhage with intraventricular extension [Figure 1]. No AVM was detected on MR angiography (MRA). Given the high suspicion for an underlying vascular lesion, DSA was performed, which revealed enlargement of the left anterior choroidal artery and early drainage into the left internal cerebral vein with no discernible nidus, likely due to the concurrent hematoma [Figure 2a]. The patient recovered his language and motor function over the next 3 months.


Imaging the spontaneous obliteration of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation using c-arm cone beam computed tomography: A case report.

Braileanu M, Yang W, Caplan JM, Huang J - Surg Neurol Int (2015)

The arteriovenous malformation (AVM) nidus (arrowhead), seen on lateral digital subtraction angiography (a, b and c) and three-dimensional sagittal (d) and coronal (e and f) cone beam computed tomography reconstructions (left carotid injections), is fed by the left anterior choroidal artery (hollow arrow) and a thalamic perforator branch of the left posterior communicating artery (right vertebral injection, not shown), and drained by the left internal cerebral vein (solid arrow). (a) Hematoma obscures the nidus at presentation, (b, d and e) 3 months follow-up reveals the AVM, and (c and f) 7 months follow-up demonstrates complete spontaneous AVM obliteration
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4596051&req=5

Figure 2: The arteriovenous malformation (AVM) nidus (arrowhead), seen on lateral digital subtraction angiography (a, b and c) and three-dimensional sagittal (d) and coronal (e and f) cone beam computed tomography reconstructions (left carotid injections), is fed by the left anterior choroidal artery (hollow arrow) and a thalamic perforator branch of the left posterior communicating artery (right vertebral injection, not shown), and drained by the left internal cerebral vein (solid arrow). (a) Hematoma obscures the nidus at presentation, (b, d and e) 3 months follow-up reveals the AVM, and (c and f) 7 months follow-up demonstrates complete spontaneous AVM obliteration
Mentions: A 56-year-old male initially presented with aphasia and right hemiparesis. Head CT, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a left thalamic intracerebral hemorrhage with intraventricular extension [Figure 1]. No AVM was detected on MR angiography (MRA). Given the high suspicion for an underlying vascular lesion, DSA was performed, which revealed enlargement of the left anterior choroidal artery and early drainage into the left internal cerebral vein with no discernible nidus, likely due to the concurrent hematoma [Figure 2a]. The patient recovered his language and motor function over the next 3 months.

Bottom Line: Spontaneous occlusion of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) without treatment is a rare occurrence.In this case, CBCT provided high resolution imaging of the AVM.Future clinical use of CBCT as an adjunct to DSA may enhance the diagnostic and therapeutic imaging of vascular lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Spontaneous occlusion of a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) without treatment is a rare occurrence.

Case description: We report the case of a 56-year-old male who presented with aphasia and right hemiparesis secondary to intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage. Diagnostic digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and c-arm cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) demonstrated a 5 mm Spetzler-Martin Grade III left thalamic AVM drained by the internal cerebral vein. Subsequent DSA and CBCT studies confirmed the spontaneous obliteration of the AVM.

Conclusions: In this case, CBCT provided high resolution imaging of the AVM. Future clinical use of CBCT as an adjunct to DSA may enhance the diagnostic and therapeutic imaging of vascular lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus