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Sleep in Populations of Drosophila Melanogaster (1,2,3).

Liu C, Haynes PR, Donelson NC, Aharon S, Griffith LC - eNeuro (2015)

Bottom Line: Social interactions between pairs of flies have been shown to affect locomotor activity patterns, but effects on locomotion and sleep patterns have not been assessed for larger populations.Surprisingly, we find that same-sex populations of flies synchronize their sleep/wake activity, resulting in a population sleep pattern, which is similar but not identical to that of isolated individuals.These data support the idea that it is possible to investigate neural mechanisms underlying the effects of population behaviors on sleep by directly looking at a large number of animals in laboratory conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, National Center for Behavioral Genomics and Volen Center for Complex Systems, Brandeis University , Waltham, Massachusetts 02454-9110.

ABSTRACT
The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a diurnal insect active during the day with consolidated sleep at night. Social interactions between pairs of flies have been shown to affect locomotor activity patterns, but effects on locomotion and sleep patterns have not been assessed for larger populations. Here, we use a commercially available locomotor activity monitor (LAM25H) system to record and analyze sleep behavior. Surprisingly, we find that same-sex populations of flies synchronize their sleep/wake activity, resulting in a population sleep pattern, which is similar but not identical to that of isolated individuals. Like individual flies, groups of flies show circadian and homeostatic regulation of sleep, as well as sexual dimorphism in sleep pattern and sensitivity to starvation and a known sleep-disrupting mutation (amnesiac). Populations of flies, however, exhibit distinct sleep characteristics from individuals. Differences in sleep appear to be due to olfaction-dependent social interactions and change with population size and sex ratio. These data support the idea that it is possible to investigate neural mechanisms underlying the effects of population behaviors on sleep by directly looking at a large number of animals in laboratory conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The ratio of male–female flies in mixed populations affect total sleep. Two experiments were done to test the effects of changes in sex ratio. A, Different ratios from 0 to 100% male were tested. Data are quantified in B. C, Small changes in ratios around the extremes were tested. Data are quantified in D. Mixed populations of flies had generally lower sleep than female or male same sex populations. Small changes in the number of males or females affected sleep most significantly at the extremes. To view sleep profiles clearly, error bars were omitted from A and C. n = 5–7 groups for all conditions. ZT, Zeitgeber time.
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Figure 8: The ratio of male–female flies in mixed populations affect total sleep. Two experiments were done to test the effects of changes in sex ratio. A, Different ratios from 0 to 100% male were tested. Data are quantified in B. C, Small changes in ratios around the extremes were tested. Data are quantified in D. Mixed populations of flies had generally lower sleep than female or male same sex populations. Small changes in the number of males or females affected sleep most significantly at the extremes. To view sleep profiles clearly, error bars were omitted from A and C. n = 5–7 groups for all conditions. ZT, Zeitgeber time.

Mentions: One-way ANOVA and nonparametric test


Sleep in Populations of Drosophila Melanogaster (1,2,3).

Liu C, Haynes PR, Donelson NC, Aharon S, Griffith LC - eNeuro (2015)

The ratio of male–female flies in mixed populations affect total sleep. Two experiments were done to test the effects of changes in sex ratio. A, Different ratios from 0 to 100% male were tested. Data are quantified in B. C, Small changes in ratios around the extremes were tested. Data are quantified in D. Mixed populations of flies had generally lower sleep than female or male same sex populations. Small changes in the number of males or females affected sleep most significantly at the extremes. To view sleep profiles clearly, error bars were omitted from A and C. n = 5–7 groups for all conditions. ZT, Zeitgeber time.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4596024&req=5

Figure 8: The ratio of male–female flies in mixed populations affect total sleep. Two experiments were done to test the effects of changes in sex ratio. A, Different ratios from 0 to 100% male were tested. Data are quantified in B. C, Small changes in ratios around the extremes were tested. Data are quantified in D. Mixed populations of flies had generally lower sleep than female or male same sex populations. Small changes in the number of males or females affected sleep most significantly at the extremes. To view sleep profiles clearly, error bars were omitted from A and C. n = 5–7 groups for all conditions. ZT, Zeitgeber time.
Mentions: One-way ANOVA and nonparametric test

Bottom Line: Social interactions between pairs of flies have been shown to affect locomotor activity patterns, but effects on locomotion and sleep patterns have not been assessed for larger populations.Surprisingly, we find that same-sex populations of flies synchronize their sleep/wake activity, resulting in a population sleep pattern, which is similar but not identical to that of isolated individuals.These data support the idea that it is possible to investigate neural mechanisms underlying the effects of population behaviors on sleep by directly looking at a large number of animals in laboratory conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, National Center for Behavioral Genomics and Volen Center for Complex Systems, Brandeis University , Waltham, Massachusetts 02454-9110.

ABSTRACT
The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a diurnal insect active during the day with consolidated sleep at night. Social interactions between pairs of flies have been shown to affect locomotor activity patterns, but effects on locomotion and sleep patterns have not been assessed for larger populations. Here, we use a commercially available locomotor activity monitor (LAM25H) system to record and analyze sleep behavior. Surprisingly, we find that same-sex populations of flies synchronize their sleep/wake activity, resulting in a population sleep pattern, which is similar but not identical to that of isolated individuals. Like individual flies, groups of flies show circadian and homeostatic regulation of sleep, as well as sexual dimorphism in sleep pattern and sensitivity to starvation and a known sleep-disrupting mutation (amnesiac). Populations of flies, however, exhibit distinct sleep characteristics from individuals. Differences in sleep appear to be due to olfaction-dependent social interactions and change with population size and sex ratio. These data support the idea that it is possible to investigate neural mechanisms underlying the effects of population behaviors on sleep by directly looking at a large number of animals in laboratory conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus