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Seasonal Monitoring of Cardiovascular and Antiulcer Agents' Concentrations in Stream Waters Encompassing a Capital City.

Varga R, Somogyvári I, Eke Z, Torkos K - J Pharm (Cairo) (2012)

Bottom Line: To obtain data on the occurrence, fate, and seasonal variation of the compounds, samples were taken from altogether eleven points located near wastewater treatment plants and confluences.The results gave no identifiable pattern in the seasonal variation of concentrations but the contribution of the tributaries and wastewater treatment plants could be followed as expected.From the runoff corrected estuary concentrations the annual contribution of these streams to pharmaceutical pollution of the Danube could be estimated to be in excess of 1 kilogram for atenolol, famotidine, metoprolol, ranitidine, and sotalol.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Joint Research and Training Laboratory on Separation Techniques, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest 1117, Hungary.

ABSTRACT
Nowadays monitoring pharmaceutical residues from surface waters is a widespread analytical task. Most of the studies are conducted from river waters or sewage treatment plants and mainly in Western Europe or North America. Such studies are seldom published from Eastern Europe, especially from stream waters, even though the prescription and consumption patterns of drugs as well as wastewater treatment procedures are very dissimilar. In Hungary the active substance of the most often prescribed drugs are cardiovascular and antiulcer agents. Hence in our study compounds belonging to these two groups were seasonally monitored in two main streams encompassing the Buda side of the Hungarian capital city and flowing into the Danube. To obtain data on the occurrence, fate, and seasonal variation of the compounds, samples were taken from altogether eleven points located near wastewater treatment plants and confluences. The results gave no identifiable pattern in the seasonal variation of concentrations but the contribution of the tributaries and wastewater treatment plants could be followed as expected. From the runoff corrected estuary concentrations the annual contribution of these streams to pharmaceutical pollution of the Danube could be estimated to be in excess of 1 kilogram for atenolol, famotidine, metoprolol, ranitidine, and sotalol.

No MeSH data available.


A schematic figure of the sampling area: numbers within circles indicate the sampling points; numbers within boxes indicate wastewater treatment plants (II—secondary, III—tertiary WWTP).
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fig1: A schematic figure of the sampling area: numbers within circles indicate the sampling points; numbers within boxes indicate wastewater treatment plants (II—secondary, III—tertiary WWTP).

Mentions: Four sampling campaigns were conducted in April, July, and October 2010 and in January 2011 (see Figure 1 and Table 1). With this seasonal sampling the effect of different weather conditions—such as air and water temperature, fall, and solar radiation—which can cause differences in the degree of dilution and photodegradation on the measured concentrations, could be followed. Along Aranyhegyi Stream six sample points were located: (1) after a tertiary WWTP, (2) after a secondary WWTP and the confluence of one of the main tributaries, (3) after another tributary confluence, in the area of the probable diffuse contamination, (4) precisely this sample was taken from the third main tributary after a secondary WWTP, but before the confluence to Aranyhegyi Stream, (5) where the stream enters into the area of Budapest, and finally (6) at the estuary. Along Hosszúréti Stream five sampling points were located: (1) after the first main confluence and a tertiary WWTP, but before a secondary one, (2) after a further tertiary and a secondary WWTP and the confluence of another main tributary, (3) before the confluence of the third main tributary, (4) after the water-quality amender damming, and finally (5) at the estuary (see Figure 1).


Seasonal Monitoring of Cardiovascular and Antiulcer Agents' Concentrations in Stream Waters Encompassing a Capital City.

Varga R, Somogyvári I, Eke Z, Torkos K - J Pharm (Cairo) (2012)

A schematic figure of the sampling area: numbers within circles indicate the sampling points; numbers within boxes indicate wastewater treatment plants (II—secondary, III—tertiary WWTP).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595969&req=5

fig1: A schematic figure of the sampling area: numbers within circles indicate the sampling points; numbers within boxes indicate wastewater treatment plants (II—secondary, III—tertiary WWTP).
Mentions: Four sampling campaigns were conducted in April, July, and October 2010 and in January 2011 (see Figure 1 and Table 1). With this seasonal sampling the effect of different weather conditions—such as air and water temperature, fall, and solar radiation—which can cause differences in the degree of dilution and photodegradation on the measured concentrations, could be followed. Along Aranyhegyi Stream six sample points were located: (1) after a tertiary WWTP, (2) after a secondary WWTP and the confluence of one of the main tributaries, (3) after another tributary confluence, in the area of the probable diffuse contamination, (4) precisely this sample was taken from the third main tributary after a secondary WWTP, but before the confluence to Aranyhegyi Stream, (5) where the stream enters into the area of Budapest, and finally (6) at the estuary. Along Hosszúréti Stream five sampling points were located: (1) after the first main confluence and a tertiary WWTP, but before a secondary one, (2) after a further tertiary and a secondary WWTP and the confluence of another main tributary, (3) before the confluence of the third main tributary, (4) after the water-quality amender damming, and finally (5) at the estuary (see Figure 1).

Bottom Line: To obtain data on the occurrence, fate, and seasonal variation of the compounds, samples were taken from altogether eleven points located near wastewater treatment plants and confluences.The results gave no identifiable pattern in the seasonal variation of concentrations but the contribution of the tributaries and wastewater treatment plants could be followed as expected.From the runoff corrected estuary concentrations the annual contribution of these streams to pharmaceutical pollution of the Danube could be estimated to be in excess of 1 kilogram for atenolol, famotidine, metoprolol, ranitidine, and sotalol.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Joint Research and Training Laboratory on Separation Techniques, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest 1117, Hungary.

ABSTRACT
Nowadays monitoring pharmaceutical residues from surface waters is a widespread analytical task. Most of the studies are conducted from river waters or sewage treatment plants and mainly in Western Europe or North America. Such studies are seldom published from Eastern Europe, especially from stream waters, even though the prescription and consumption patterns of drugs as well as wastewater treatment procedures are very dissimilar. In Hungary the active substance of the most often prescribed drugs are cardiovascular and antiulcer agents. Hence in our study compounds belonging to these two groups were seasonally monitored in two main streams encompassing the Buda side of the Hungarian capital city and flowing into the Danube. To obtain data on the occurrence, fate, and seasonal variation of the compounds, samples were taken from altogether eleven points located near wastewater treatment plants and confluences. The results gave no identifiable pattern in the seasonal variation of concentrations but the contribution of the tributaries and wastewater treatment plants could be followed as expected. From the runoff corrected estuary concentrations the annual contribution of these streams to pharmaceutical pollution of the Danube could be estimated to be in excess of 1 kilogram for atenolol, famotidine, metoprolol, ranitidine, and sotalol.

No MeSH data available.