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Activities of visual cortical and hippocampal neurons co-fluctuate in freely moving rats during spatial behavior.

Haggerty DC, Ji D - Elife (2015)

Bottom Line: The precise activities of individual V1 neurons fluctuate every time the animal travels through the track, in a correlated fashion with those of hippocampal place cells firing at overlapping locations.The results suggest the existence of visual cortical neurons that are functionally coupled with hippocampal place cells for spatial processing during natural behavior.These visual neurons may also participate in the formation and storage of hippocampal-dependent memories.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, United States.

ABSTRACT
Visual cues exert a powerful control over hippocampal place cell activities that encode external spaces. The functional interaction of visual cortical neurons and hippocampal place cells during spatial navigation behavior has yet to be elucidated. Here we show that, like hippocampal place cells, many neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) of freely moving rats selectively fire at specific locations as animals run repeatedly on a track. The V1 location-specific activity leads hippocampal place cell activity both spatially and temporally. The precise activities of individual V1 neurons fluctuate every time the animal travels through the track, in a correlated fashion with those of hippocampal place cells firing at overlapping locations. The results suggest the existence of visual cortical neurons that are functionally coupled with hippocampal place cells for spatial processing during natural behavior. These visual neurons may also participate in the formation and storage of hippocampal-dependent memories.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Two more examples of overlapping V1-CA1 cell pairs with correlated lap-by-lap fluctuations in, each from a different animal.For each example (A or B), plotted on the left are the lap-by-lap spike raster and firing rate curves of the V1 (red) and CA1 (blue) cells, while plotted on the right are the lap-by-lap fluctuations in rate (∆rate) and COM (∆COM) for the two cells on the left, and in rate (modified ∆rate) and COM (modified ∆COM) after the modulation by speed and head direction was removed. See the main figure (Figure 6) legend for details.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08902.009
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fig6s1: Two more examples of overlapping V1-CA1 cell pairs with correlated lap-by-lap fluctuations in, each from a different animal.For each example (A or B), plotted on the left are the lap-by-lap spike raster and firing rate curves of the V1 (red) and CA1 (blue) cells, while plotted on the right are the lap-by-lap fluctuations in rate (∆rate) and COM (∆COM) for the two cells on the left, and in rate (modified ∆rate) and COM (modified ∆COM) after the modulation by speed and head direction was removed. See the main figure (Figure 6) legend for details.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08902.009

Mentions: As many pairs of V1 and CA1 cells displayed overlapping firing fields on a trajectory (Figure 6A; see more examples in Figure 6—figure supplement 1), we reasoned that these pairs of V1 and CA1 cells could be specifically interacting for integrating the visual information present at a location to the hippocampal place cell activity encoding the same location. Therefore, we next focused on the possible interaction between V1 and CA1 cells with overlapping firing fields. We observed that the firing rates and firing locations of such V1 and CA1 cells fluctuated from lap to lap within their respective firing fields, and interestingly, they often fluctuated together in a correlated fashion (Figure 6A,B, Figure 6—figure supplement 1). We quantified this observation by an analysis similar to the ‘noise’ correlation in previous studies on V1 cell correlation in primates (Zohary et al., 1994; Ecker et al., 2010; Hansen et al., 2012). For a pair of cells with overlapping firing fields, we identified each cell's spikes within its firing field for each individual lap, and computed two quantities of these spikes: the (within-field) firing rate and the center of mass (COM) of their firing locations. We then obtained the lap-by-lap fluctuations in within-field firing rate (Δrate - the difference between a lap's firing rate and the averaged firing rate across all laps) and in COM (ΔCOM) for each cell. Finally, we computed the Pearson correlation in Δrate and in ΔCOM between two cells, which measures how closely the two cells varied their precise firing rate or firing location each time the animal traveled through the overlapped firing fields. Indeed, the pair of cells shown in Figure 6A were significantly correlated in both Δrate and ΔCOM (Figure 6C; see more examples in Figure 6—figure supplement 1).10.7554/eLife.08902.008Figure 6.Pairs of V1 and CA1 cells with overlapping firing fields displayed correlated lap-by-lap fluctuations in firing rate and firing location.


Activities of visual cortical and hippocampal neurons co-fluctuate in freely moving rats during spatial behavior.

Haggerty DC, Ji D - Elife (2015)

Two more examples of overlapping V1-CA1 cell pairs with correlated lap-by-lap fluctuations in, each from a different animal.For each example (A or B), plotted on the left are the lap-by-lap spike raster and firing rate curves of the V1 (red) and CA1 (blue) cells, while plotted on the right are the lap-by-lap fluctuations in rate (∆rate) and COM (∆COM) for the two cells on the left, and in rate (modified ∆rate) and COM (modified ∆COM) after the modulation by speed and head direction was removed. See the main figure (Figure 6) legend for details.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08902.009
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595967&req=5

fig6s1: Two more examples of overlapping V1-CA1 cell pairs with correlated lap-by-lap fluctuations in, each from a different animal.For each example (A or B), plotted on the left are the lap-by-lap spike raster and firing rate curves of the V1 (red) and CA1 (blue) cells, while plotted on the right are the lap-by-lap fluctuations in rate (∆rate) and COM (∆COM) for the two cells on the left, and in rate (modified ∆rate) and COM (modified ∆COM) after the modulation by speed and head direction was removed. See the main figure (Figure 6) legend for details.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08902.009
Mentions: As many pairs of V1 and CA1 cells displayed overlapping firing fields on a trajectory (Figure 6A; see more examples in Figure 6—figure supplement 1), we reasoned that these pairs of V1 and CA1 cells could be specifically interacting for integrating the visual information present at a location to the hippocampal place cell activity encoding the same location. Therefore, we next focused on the possible interaction between V1 and CA1 cells with overlapping firing fields. We observed that the firing rates and firing locations of such V1 and CA1 cells fluctuated from lap to lap within their respective firing fields, and interestingly, they often fluctuated together in a correlated fashion (Figure 6A,B, Figure 6—figure supplement 1). We quantified this observation by an analysis similar to the ‘noise’ correlation in previous studies on V1 cell correlation in primates (Zohary et al., 1994; Ecker et al., 2010; Hansen et al., 2012). For a pair of cells with overlapping firing fields, we identified each cell's spikes within its firing field for each individual lap, and computed two quantities of these spikes: the (within-field) firing rate and the center of mass (COM) of their firing locations. We then obtained the lap-by-lap fluctuations in within-field firing rate (Δrate - the difference between a lap's firing rate and the averaged firing rate across all laps) and in COM (ΔCOM) for each cell. Finally, we computed the Pearson correlation in Δrate and in ΔCOM between two cells, which measures how closely the two cells varied their precise firing rate or firing location each time the animal traveled through the overlapped firing fields. Indeed, the pair of cells shown in Figure 6A were significantly correlated in both Δrate and ΔCOM (Figure 6C; see more examples in Figure 6—figure supplement 1).10.7554/eLife.08902.008Figure 6.Pairs of V1 and CA1 cells with overlapping firing fields displayed correlated lap-by-lap fluctuations in firing rate and firing location.

Bottom Line: The precise activities of individual V1 neurons fluctuate every time the animal travels through the track, in a correlated fashion with those of hippocampal place cells firing at overlapping locations.The results suggest the existence of visual cortical neurons that are functionally coupled with hippocampal place cells for spatial processing during natural behavior.These visual neurons may also participate in the formation and storage of hippocampal-dependent memories.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, United States.

ABSTRACT
Visual cues exert a powerful control over hippocampal place cell activities that encode external spaces. The functional interaction of visual cortical neurons and hippocampal place cells during spatial navigation behavior has yet to be elucidated. Here we show that, like hippocampal place cells, many neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) of freely moving rats selectively fire at specific locations as animals run repeatedly on a track. The V1 location-specific activity leads hippocampal place cell activity both spatially and temporally. The precise activities of individual V1 neurons fluctuate every time the animal travels through the track, in a correlated fashion with those of hippocampal place cells firing at overlapping locations. The results suggest the existence of visual cortical neurons that are functionally coupled with hippocampal place cells for spatial processing during natural behavior. These visual neurons may also participate in the formation and storage of hippocampal-dependent memories.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus