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Microencapsulation for the Therapeutic Delivery of Drugs, Live Mammalian and Bacterial Cells, and Other Biopharmaceutics: Current Status and Future Directions.

Tomaro-Duchesneau C, Saha S, Malhotra M, Kahouli I, Prakash S - J Pharm (Cairo) (2012)

Bottom Line: Microencapsulation is a technology that has shown significant promise in biotherapeutics, and other applications.It has been proven useful in the immobilization of drugs, live mammalian and bacterial cells and other cells, and other biopharmaceutics molecules, as it can provide material structuration, protection of the enclosed product, and controlled release of the encapsulated contents, all of which can ensure efficient and safe therapeutic effects.It also summarizes the state-of-the-art successes of microencapsulation, specifically with regard to the encapsulation of microorganisms, mammalian cells, drugs, and other biopharmaceutics in various diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Physiology and Artificial Cells and Organs Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, 3775 University Street, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4.

ABSTRACT
Microencapsulation is a technology that has shown significant promise in biotherapeutics, and other applications. It has been proven useful in the immobilization of drugs, live mammalian and bacterial cells and other cells, and other biopharmaceutics molecules, as it can provide material structuration, protection of the enclosed product, and controlled release of the encapsulated contents, all of which can ensure efficient and safe therapeutic effects. This paper is a comprehensive review of microencapsulation and its latest developments in the field. It provides a comprehensive overview of the technology and primary goals of microencapsulation and discusses various processes and techniques involved in microencapsulation including physical, chemical, physicochemical, and other methods involved. It also summarizes the state-of-the-art successes of microencapsulation, specifically with regard to the encapsulation of microorganisms, mammalian cells, drugs, and other biopharmaceutics in various diseases. The limitations and future directions of microencapsulation technologies are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


The main biopharmaceutical goals of microencapsulation: microencapsulation can be used to achieve material structuration, therapeutic product protection, and targeted delivery and/or controlled release of the encapsulated biotherapeutics.
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fig1: The main biopharmaceutical goals of microencapsulation: microencapsulation can be used to achieve material structuration, therapeutic product protection, and targeted delivery and/or controlled release of the encapsulated biotherapeutics.

Mentions: Microencapsulation can be used to achieve a number of objectives. Some goals of microencapsulation include material structuration, protection of the enclosed product, and controlled release of the encapsulated contents, as shown in Figure 1. Microcapsules can provide structuration to compounds that are normally difficult to administer due to factors such as the material's insolubility, volatility, reactivity, hygroscopicity, and physical state [93]. Microcapsules may also serve the role of protecting the encapsulated contents to prevent the degradation of the product due to external environmental factors such as oxygen, light, heat, and humidity which could destroy any labile compound. Protection by microcapsules may also be required when orally administering a therapeutic, due to exposure to the harsh conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT). In addition, the host's immune system would quickly lead to the implanted cells' rejection and undesired side effects if the cells are recognized as foreign. Immunoprotection and immunoisolation may be achieved by a microcapsule, important for the in vivo delivery and implantation of mammalian cells, such as stem cells, for tissue and cell engineering applications. The capability of microcapsules to serve the purpose of immunoprotection has been well demonstrated in a number of disease contexts, including type 1 diabetes, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, cancers, and other disorders [48, 94–97]. Microcapsules may also serve to permit the controlled release of the encapsulated contents, which can be regulated by chemical, physical, and mechanical factors. A controlled release can permit a longer and more efficient therapeutic effect of an enzymatic by-product, which, otherwise, may have a limited half-life in vivo. It may also regulate the release of the encapsulated product at the desired time, rate, dose, and site of action.


Microencapsulation for the Therapeutic Delivery of Drugs, Live Mammalian and Bacterial Cells, and Other Biopharmaceutics: Current Status and Future Directions.

Tomaro-Duchesneau C, Saha S, Malhotra M, Kahouli I, Prakash S - J Pharm (Cairo) (2012)

The main biopharmaceutical goals of microencapsulation: microencapsulation can be used to achieve material structuration, therapeutic product protection, and targeted delivery and/or controlled release of the encapsulated biotherapeutics.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595965&req=5

fig1: The main biopharmaceutical goals of microencapsulation: microencapsulation can be used to achieve material structuration, therapeutic product protection, and targeted delivery and/or controlled release of the encapsulated biotherapeutics.
Mentions: Microencapsulation can be used to achieve a number of objectives. Some goals of microencapsulation include material structuration, protection of the enclosed product, and controlled release of the encapsulated contents, as shown in Figure 1. Microcapsules can provide structuration to compounds that are normally difficult to administer due to factors such as the material's insolubility, volatility, reactivity, hygroscopicity, and physical state [93]. Microcapsules may also serve the role of protecting the encapsulated contents to prevent the degradation of the product due to external environmental factors such as oxygen, light, heat, and humidity which could destroy any labile compound. Protection by microcapsules may also be required when orally administering a therapeutic, due to exposure to the harsh conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT). In addition, the host's immune system would quickly lead to the implanted cells' rejection and undesired side effects if the cells are recognized as foreign. Immunoprotection and immunoisolation may be achieved by a microcapsule, important for the in vivo delivery and implantation of mammalian cells, such as stem cells, for tissue and cell engineering applications. The capability of microcapsules to serve the purpose of immunoprotection has been well demonstrated in a number of disease contexts, including type 1 diabetes, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, cancers, and other disorders [48, 94–97]. Microcapsules may also serve to permit the controlled release of the encapsulated contents, which can be regulated by chemical, physical, and mechanical factors. A controlled release can permit a longer and more efficient therapeutic effect of an enzymatic by-product, which, otherwise, may have a limited half-life in vivo. It may also regulate the release of the encapsulated product at the desired time, rate, dose, and site of action.

Bottom Line: Microencapsulation is a technology that has shown significant promise in biotherapeutics, and other applications.It has been proven useful in the immobilization of drugs, live mammalian and bacterial cells and other cells, and other biopharmaceutics molecules, as it can provide material structuration, protection of the enclosed product, and controlled release of the encapsulated contents, all of which can ensure efficient and safe therapeutic effects.It also summarizes the state-of-the-art successes of microencapsulation, specifically with regard to the encapsulation of microorganisms, mammalian cells, drugs, and other biopharmaceutics in various diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomedical Technology and Cell Therapy Research Laboratory, Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Physiology and Artificial Cells and Organs Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, McGill University, 3775 University Street, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4.

ABSTRACT
Microencapsulation is a technology that has shown significant promise in biotherapeutics, and other applications. It has been proven useful in the immobilization of drugs, live mammalian and bacterial cells and other cells, and other biopharmaceutics molecules, as it can provide material structuration, protection of the enclosed product, and controlled release of the encapsulated contents, all of which can ensure efficient and safe therapeutic effects. This paper is a comprehensive review of microencapsulation and its latest developments in the field. It provides a comprehensive overview of the technology and primary goals of microencapsulation and discusses various processes and techniques involved in microencapsulation including physical, chemical, physicochemical, and other methods involved. It also summarizes the state-of-the-art successes of microencapsulation, specifically with regard to the encapsulation of microorganisms, mammalian cells, drugs, and other biopharmaceutics in various diseases. The limitations and future directions of microencapsulation technologies are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.