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Quality Assessment of Serially Ultradiluted and Agitated Drug Digitalis purpurea by Emission Spectroscopy and Clinical Analysis of Its Effect on the Heart Rate of Indian Bufo melanostictus.

Sharma A, Purkait B - J Pharm (Cairo) (2012)

Bottom Line: Emission spectra were obtained for the experimental ultra-diluted Digitalis purpurea extract and Digoxin to identify and characterize them.The observed RR pattern and emission spectra show an association.The quality assessment of the commercial ultra-diluted organic drugs obtained from natural products may be initiated by monitoring in vivo studies on animal models.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: B.C.R.T. Hospital and School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, C-1/164, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721 302, India.

ABSTRACT
The investigation of ultradiluted (homeopathic) drugs is extremely interesting and challenging, and from that point of view this study shows novelty. A study of in vivo changes in heart rate of the Indian Bufo melanostictus caused by commercially available serially ultra-diluted and agitated extract of Digitalis purpurea has been tried in order to understand their pharmacological role. RR interval (of ECG) was compared after intraperitoneal administration of serially diluted and agitated Digitalis purpurea extract, diluent rectified spirit, and Digoxin in anesthetized animals. The study revealed statistically significant changes in the heart rate after application of these drugs except in case of Digoxin and the 200th serial dilution of Digitalis purpurea. The duration of RR intervals after application of the drugs was corroborative of the effect of Digoxin and Digitalis purpurea extract up to 30th dilution. Emission spectra were obtained for the experimental ultra-diluted Digitalis purpurea extract and Digoxin to identify and characterize them. The observed RR pattern and emission spectra show an association. The quality assessment of the commercial ultra-diluted organic drugs obtained from natural products may be initiated by monitoring in vivo studies on animal models.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Emission spectra obtained by analytical fluorescence spectroscopy of natural product Digitalis purpurea derivative having purest derivative component Digoxin (B) showing emission maxima at 318 nm. C6 = Digitalis purpurea 6 having emission maxima 357 nm and 374 nm. D30 = Digitalis purpurea 30 emission maxima 357 nm and 374 nm, E200 = Digitalis purpurea 200 emission maxima 357 nm and 374 nm. In all the emission studies, the samples are excited at 255 nm.
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fig1: Emission spectra obtained by analytical fluorescence spectroscopy of natural product Digitalis purpurea derivative having purest derivative component Digoxin (B) showing emission maxima at 318 nm. C6 = Digitalis purpurea 6 having emission maxima 357 nm and 374 nm. D30 = Digitalis purpurea 30 emission maxima 357 nm and 374 nm, E200 = Digitalis purpurea 200 emission maxima 357 nm and 374 nm. In all the emission studies, the samples are excited at 255 nm.

Mentions: The fluorescence spectra of the drugs were measured using a Shimadzu (model no UV-1601) spectrophotometer and a Spex-Fluorolog-3 Spectrofluorimeter (model no. FL3-11). The fluorescence spectroscopy was done to detect Digoxin or Digitalis-like ingredient in the drugs used and to note its relevance, if any, with the obtained RR. We have taken the fluorescence spectra of the compound at different dilutions. The obtained emission spectra are shown in Figure 1.


Quality Assessment of Serially Ultradiluted and Agitated Drug Digitalis purpurea by Emission Spectroscopy and Clinical Analysis of Its Effect on the Heart Rate of Indian Bufo melanostictus.

Sharma A, Purkait B - J Pharm (Cairo) (2012)

Emission spectra obtained by analytical fluorescence spectroscopy of natural product Digitalis purpurea derivative having purest derivative component Digoxin (B) showing emission maxima at 318 nm. C6 = Digitalis purpurea 6 having emission maxima 357 nm and 374 nm. D30 = Digitalis purpurea 30 emission maxima 357 nm and 374 nm, E200 = Digitalis purpurea 200 emission maxima 357 nm and 374 nm. In all the emission studies, the samples are excited at 255 nm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595937&req=5

fig1: Emission spectra obtained by analytical fluorescence spectroscopy of natural product Digitalis purpurea derivative having purest derivative component Digoxin (B) showing emission maxima at 318 nm. C6 = Digitalis purpurea 6 having emission maxima 357 nm and 374 nm. D30 = Digitalis purpurea 30 emission maxima 357 nm and 374 nm, E200 = Digitalis purpurea 200 emission maxima 357 nm and 374 nm. In all the emission studies, the samples are excited at 255 nm.
Mentions: The fluorescence spectra of the drugs were measured using a Shimadzu (model no UV-1601) spectrophotometer and a Spex-Fluorolog-3 Spectrofluorimeter (model no. FL3-11). The fluorescence spectroscopy was done to detect Digoxin or Digitalis-like ingredient in the drugs used and to note its relevance, if any, with the obtained RR. We have taken the fluorescence spectra of the compound at different dilutions. The obtained emission spectra are shown in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Emission spectra were obtained for the experimental ultra-diluted Digitalis purpurea extract and Digoxin to identify and characterize them.The observed RR pattern and emission spectra show an association.The quality assessment of the commercial ultra-diluted organic drugs obtained from natural products may be initiated by monitoring in vivo studies on animal models.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: B.C.R.T. Hospital and School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, C-1/164, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721 302, India.

ABSTRACT
The investigation of ultradiluted (homeopathic) drugs is extremely interesting and challenging, and from that point of view this study shows novelty. A study of in vivo changes in heart rate of the Indian Bufo melanostictus caused by commercially available serially ultra-diluted and agitated extract of Digitalis purpurea has been tried in order to understand their pharmacological role. RR interval (of ECG) was compared after intraperitoneal administration of serially diluted and agitated Digitalis purpurea extract, diluent rectified spirit, and Digoxin in anesthetized animals. The study revealed statistically significant changes in the heart rate after application of these drugs except in case of Digoxin and the 200th serial dilution of Digitalis purpurea. The duration of RR intervals after application of the drugs was corroborative of the effect of Digoxin and Digitalis purpurea extract up to 30th dilution. Emission spectra were obtained for the experimental ultra-diluted Digitalis purpurea extract and Digoxin to identify and characterize them. The observed RR pattern and emission spectra show an association. The quality assessment of the commercial ultra-diluted organic drugs obtained from natural products may be initiated by monitoring in vivo studies on animal models.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus