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Association between sucrose intake and risk of overweight and obesity in a prospective sub-cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer in Norfolk (EPIC-Norfolk).

Kuhnle GG, Tasevska N, Lentjes MA, Griffin JL, Sims MA, Richardson L, Aspinall SM, Mulligan AA, Luben RN, Khaw KT - Public Health Nutr (2015)

Bottom Line: Self-reported sucrose intake was significantly positively associated with the biomarker.Our results suggest that sucrose measured by objective biomarker but not self-reported sucrose intake is positively associated with BMI.Future studies should consider the use of objective biomarkers of sucrose intake.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1Department of Food & Nutritional Sciences,University of Reading,Reading RG6 6AP,UK.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate associations between sugar intake and overweight using dietary biomarkers in the Norfolk cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Norfolk).

Design: Prospective cohort study.

Setting: EPIC-Norfolk in the UK, recruitment between 1993 and 1997.

Subjects: Men and women (n 1734) aged 39-77 years. Sucrose intake was assessed using 7 d diet diaries. Baseline spot urine samples were analysed for sucrose by GC-MS. Sucrose concentration adjusted by specific gravity was used as a biomarker for intake. Regression analyses were used to investigate associations between sucrose intake and risk of BMI>25·0 kg/m2 after three years of follow-up.

Results: After three years of follow-up, mean BMI was 26·8 kg/m2. Self-reported sucrose intake was significantly positively associated with the biomarker. Associations between the biomarker and BMI were positive (β=0·25; 95 % CI 0·08, 0·43), while they were inverse when using self-reported dietary data (β=-1·40; 95 % CI -1·81, -0·99). The age- and sex-adjusted OR for BMI>25·0 kg/m2 in participants in the fifth v. first quintile was 1·54 (95 % CI 1·12, 2·12; P trend=0·003) when using biomarker and 0·56 (95 % CI 0·40, 0·77; P trend<0·001) with self-reported dietary data.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that sucrose measured by objective biomarker but not self-reported sucrose intake is positively associated with BMI. Future studies should consider the use of objective biomarkers of sucrose intake.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship between the biomarker (specific-gravity-adjusted urinary sucrose) andself-reported intake (energy-adjusted sucrose intake, as assessed by 7 d diet diary(7DD)), expressed as a ratio, and BMI after three years of follow-up among men andwomen (n 1734) aged 39–77 years, Norfolk cohort of the EuropeanProspective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Norfolk). Presented arebox-and whisker plots in which the bottom and top of the box represents the 25th and75th percentile, respectively (the interquartile range), the line within the boxrepresents the median and the bottom and top of the whisker represents the minimumand maximum value, respectively, of log-transformed ratio of biomarker to 7DD forthree BMI classes (normal weight (left), overweight (middle) and obese (right)) atthe second health check (2HC); and a least-square linear model with 95 % confidenceinterval ()
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fig2: Relationship between the biomarker (specific-gravity-adjusted urinary sucrose) andself-reported intake (energy-adjusted sucrose intake, as assessed by 7 d diet diary(7DD)), expressed as a ratio, and BMI after three years of follow-up among men andwomen (n 1734) aged 39–77 years, Norfolk cohort of the EuropeanProspective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Norfolk). Presented arebox-and whisker plots in which the bottom and top of the box represents the 25th and75th percentile, respectively (the interquartile range), the line within the boxrepresents the median and the bottom and top of the whisker represents the minimumand maximum value, respectively, of log-transformed ratio of biomarker to 7DD forthree BMI classes (normal weight (left), overweight (middle) and obese (right)) atthe second health check (2HC); and a least-square linear model with 95 % confidenceinterval ()

Mentions: The relationship between biomarker and self-reported intake, expressed as the ratio ofbiomarker to energy-adjusted sucrose intake, was positively associated with baseline andfollow-up BMI (Fig. 2). Indeed, there was asignificant positive association with BMI at follow-up (β=0·04; 95 % CI0·03, 0·05) in an unadjusted model and after adjusting for age and sex(β=0·04; 95 % CI 0·02, 0·05). The median ratio was approximately 50 %higher in overweight and obese participants when compared with normal-weightparticipants.Fig. 2


Association between sucrose intake and risk of overweight and obesity in a prospective sub-cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer in Norfolk (EPIC-Norfolk).

Kuhnle GG, Tasevska N, Lentjes MA, Griffin JL, Sims MA, Richardson L, Aspinall SM, Mulligan AA, Luben RN, Khaw KT - Public Health Nutr (2015)

Relationship between the biomarker (specific-gravity-adjusted urinary sucrose) andself-reported intake (energy-adjusted sucrose intake, as assessed by 7 d diet diary(7DD)), expressed as a ratio, and BMI after three years of follow-up among men andwomen (n 1734) aged 39–77 years, Norfolk cohort of the EuropeanProspective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Norfolk). Presented arebox-and whisker plots in which the bottom and top of the box represents the 25th and75th percentile, respectively (the interquartile range), the line within the boxrepresents the median and the bottom and top of the whisker represents the minimumand maximum value, respectively, of log-transformed ratio of biomarker to 7DD forthree BMI classes (normal weight (left), overweight (middle) and obese (right)) atthe second health check (2HC); and a least-square linear model with 95 % confidenceinterval ()
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595857&req=5

fig2: Relationship between the biomarker (specific-gravity-adjusted urinary sucrose) andself-reported intake (energy-adjusted sucrose intake, as assessed by 7 d diet diary(7DD)), expressed as a ratio, and BMI after three years of follow-up among men andwomen (n 1734) aged 39–77 years, Norfolk cohort of the EuropeanProspective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Norfolk). Presented arebox-and whisker plots in which the bottom and top of the box represents the 25th and75th percentile, respectively (the interquartile range), the line within the boxrepresents the median and the bottom and top of the whisker represents the minimumand maximum value, respectively, of log-transformed ratio of biomarker to 7DD forthree BMI classes (normal weight (left), overweight (middle) and obese (right)) atthe second health check (2HC); and a least-square linear model with 95 % confidenceinterval ()
Mentions: The relationship between biomarker and self-reported intake, expressed as the ratio ofbiomarker to energy-adjusted sucrose intake, was positively associated with baseline andfollow-up BMI (Fig. 2). Indeed, there was asignificant positive association with BMI at follow-up (β=0·04; 95 % CI0·03, 0·05) in an unadjusted model and after adjusting for age and sex(β=0·04; 95 % CI 0·02, 0·05). The median ratio was approximately 50 %higher in overweight and obese participants when compared with normal-weightparticipants.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Self-reported sucrose intake was significantly positively associated with the biomarker.Our results suggest that sucrose measured by objective biomarker but not self-reported sucrose intake is positively associated with BMI.Future studies should consider the use of objective biomarkers of sucrose intake.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1Department of Food & Nutritional Sciences,University of Reading,Reading RG6 6AP,UK.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate associations between sugar intake and overweight using dietary biomarkers in the Norfolk cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC-Norfolk).

Design: Prospective cohort study.

Setting: EPIC-Norfolk in the UK, recruitment between 1993 and 1997.

Subjects: Men and women (n 1734) aged 39-77 years. Sucrose intake was assessed using 7 d diet diaries. Baseline spot urine samples were analysed for sucrose by GC-MS. Sucrose concentration adjusted by specific gravity was used as a biomarker for intake. Regression analyses were used to investigate associations between sucrose intake and risk of BMI>25·0 kg/m2 after three years of follow-up.

Results: After three years of follow-up, mean BMI was 26·8 kg/m2. Self-reported sucrose intake was significantly positively associated with the biomarker. Associations between the biomarker and BMI were positive (β=0·25; 95 % CI 0·08, 0·43), while they were inverse when using self-reported dietary data (β=-1·40; 95 % CI -1·81, -0·99). The age- and sex-adjusted OR for BMI>25·0 kg/m2 in participants in the fifth v. first quintile was 1·54 (95 % CI 1·12, 2·12; P trend=0·003) when using biomarker and 0·56 (95 % CI 0·40, 0·77; P trend<0·001) with self-reported dietary data.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that sucrose measured by objective biomarker but not self-reported sucrose intake is positively associated with BMI. Future studies should consider the use of objective biomarkers of sucrose intake.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus