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Ultra-high-resolution 3D digitalized imaging of the cerebral angioarchitecture in rats using synchrotron radiation.

Zhang MQ, Zhou L, Deng QF, Xie YY, Xiao TQ, Cao YZ, Zhang JW, Chen XM, Yin XZ, Xiao B - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: This approach provides a systematic and detailed view of the cerebrovascular anatomy at the micrometer level without any need for contrast agents.From qualitative and quantitative perspectives, the present 3D data provide a considerable insight into the spatial vascular network for whole rodent brain, particularly for functionally important regions of interest, such as the hippocampus, pre-frontal cerebral cortex and the corpus striatum.We extended these results to synchrotron-based virtual micro-endoscopy, thus revealing the trajectory of targeted vessels in 3D.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, China.

ABSTRACT
The angioarchitecture is a fundamental aspect of brain development and physiology. However, available imaging tools are unsuited for non-destructive cerebral mapping of the functionally important three-dimensional (3D) vascular microstructures. To address this issue, we developed an ultra-high resolution 3D digitalized angioarchitectural map for rat brain, based on synchrotron radiation phase contrast imaging (SR-PCI) with pixel size of 5.92 μm. This approach provides a systematic and detailed view of the cerebrovascular anatomy at the micrometer level without any need for contrast agents. From qualitative and quantitative perspectives, the present 3D data provide a considerable insight into the spatial vascular network for whole rodent brain, particularly for functionally important regions of interest, such as the hippocampus, pre-frontal cerebral cortex and the corpus striatum. We extended these results to synchrotron-based virtual micro-endoscopy, thus revealing the trajectory of targeted vessels in 3D. The SR-PCI method for systematic visualization of cerebral microvasculature holds considerable promise for wider application in life sciences, including 3D micro-imaging in experimental models of neurodevelopmental and vascular disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

3D tomography of cerebral angioarchitecture in the three planes.(A) Rostral (top) and caudal (upper-middle) views of vascular mapping. 3D corresponding skeletonization in rostral (lower-middle) and caudal (bottom) views. Pseudo-colored enhanced effects represent the distributional range of the vessel diameter spectrum. (B) Dorsal (top) and ventral (upper-middle) views of vascular mapping. 3D corresponding skeletonization in dosal (lower-middle) and ventral (bottom) views. (C) Lateral right and lateral left views of vascular mapping. 3D corresponding skeletonization in lateral right (lower-middle) and lateral left (bottom) views. The pseudocolor bar in the lower-right corner of C panel indicates the diameter ranges of vascular trees in the whole brain. Scale bars: 3000 μm (A–C).
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f3: 3D tomography of cerebral angioarchitecture in the three planes.(A) Rostral (top) and caudal (upper-middle) views of vascular mapping. 3D corresponding skeletonization in rostral (lower-middle) and caudal (bottom) views. Pseudo-colored enhanced effects represent the distributional range of the vessel diameter spectrum. (B) Dorsal (top) and ventral (upper-middle) views of vascular mapping. 3D corresponding skeletonization in dosal (lower-middle) and ventral (bottom) views. (C) Lateral right and lateral left views of vascular mapping. 3D corresponding skeletonization in lateral right (lower-middle) and lateral left (bottom) views. The pseudocolor bar in the lower-right corner of C panel indicates the diameter ranges of vascular trees in the whole brain. Scale bars: 3000 μm (A–C).

Mentions: We obtained very detailed cerebral 3D digitalized angioarchitectural maps (Fig. 3). No dislocation was observed along the dorsal-ventral, rostral-caudal and right-left lateral axes in the reconstruction of the 3D cerebral images. In other words, the slices in the three planes were inherently aligned. In particular, we managed to process the images to remove cerebral ventricles, thus eliminating an important source of the visual interference, and giving a clearer depiction of the complete spatial vascular network. Herein, we see the penetration of cortical arteries vertically into the cortex and terminating in different cortical layers. Typical short, intermediate, long cortical, subcortical and medullary vessels were clearly distinguished. The vascular network tended to be more abundant in the deep cerebral cortex than in superficial layers. Vessels in the medulla mostly exhibited heliciform or corrugated arrangements, forming substantial obtuse or right-angled branches in the brain parenchyma. Additionally, corresponding 3D vascular network skeleton maps were extracted for subsequent analysis. Continuous pseudocolour alternations depicted the distribution range of the spectrum of vessel diameters, thus indicating that vessels with diameter <30 μm (depicted in blue) form a key component of brain vasculature.


Ultra-high-resolution 3D digitalized imaging of the cerebral angioarchitecture in rats using synchrotron radiation.

Zhang MQ, Zhou L, Deng QF, Xie YY, Xiao TQ, Cao YZ, Zhang JW, Chen XM, Yin XZ, Xiao B - Sci Rep (2015)

3D tomography of cerebral angioarchitecture in the three planes.(A) Rostral (top) and caudal (upper-middle) views of vascular mapping. 3D corresponding skeletonization in rostral (lower-middle) and caudal (bottom) views. Pseudo-colored enhanced effects represent the distributional range of the vessel diameter spectrum. (B) Dorsal (top) and ventral (upper-middle) views of vascular mapping. 3D corresponding skeletonization in dosal (lower-middle) and ventral (bottom) views. (C) Lateral right and lateral left views of vascular mapping. 3D corresponding skeletonization in lateral right (lower-middle) and lateral left (bottom) views. The pseudocolor bar in the lower-right corner of C panel indicates the diameter ranges of vascular trees in the whole brain. Scale bars: 3000 μm (A–C).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595735&req=5

f3: 3D tomography of cerebral angioarchitecture in the three planes.(A) Rostral (top) and caudal (upper-middle) views of vascular mapping. 3D corresponding skeletonization in rostral (lower-middle) and caudal (bottom) views. Pseudo-colored enhanced effects represent the distributional range of the vessel diameter spectrum. (B) Dorsal (top) and ventral (upper-middle) views of vascular mapping. 3D corresponding skeletonization in dosal (lower-middle) and ventral (bottom) views. (C) Lateral right and lateral left views of vascular mapping. 3D corresponding skeletonization in lateral right (lower-middle) and lateral left (bottom) views. The pseudocolor bar in the lower-right corner of C panel indicates the diameter ranges of vascular trees in the whole brain. Scale bars: 3000 μm (A–C).
Mentions: We obtained very detailed cerebral 3D digitalized angioarchitectural maps (Fig. 3). No dislocation was observed along the dorsal-ventral, rostral-caudal and right-left lateral axes in the reconstruction of the 3D cerebral images. In other words, the slices in the three planes were inherently aligned. In particular, we managed to process the images to remove cerebral ventricles, thus eliminating an important source of the visual interference, and giving a clearer depiction of the complete spatial vascular network. Herein, we see the penetration of cortical arteries vertically into the cortex and terminating in different cortical layers. Typical short, intermediate, long cortical, subcortical and medullary vessels were clearly distinguished. The vascular network tended to be more abundant in the deep cerebral cortex than in superficial layers. Vessels in the medulla mostly exhibited heliciform or corrugated arrangements, forming substantial obtuse or right-angled branches in the brain parenchyma. Additionally, corresponding 3D vascular network skeleton maps were extracted for subsequent analysis. Continuous pseudocolour alternations depicted the distribution range of the spectrum of vessel diameters, thus indicating that vessels with diameter <30 μm (depicted in blue) form a key component of brain vasculature.

Bottom Line: This approach provides a systematic and detailed view of the cerebrovascular anatomy at the micrometer level without any need for contrast agents.From qualitative and quantitative perspectives, the present 3D data provide a considerable insight into the spatial vascular network for whole rodent brain, particularly for functionally important regions of interest, such as the hippocampus, pre-frontal cerebral cortex and the corpus striatum.We extended these results to synchrotron-based virtual micro-endoscopy, thus revealing the trajectory of targeted vessels in 3D.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, China.

ABSTRACT
The angioarchitecture is a fundamental aspect of brain development and physiology. However, available imaging tools are unsuited for non-destructive cerebral mapping of the functionally important three-dimensional (3D) vascular microstructures. To address this issue, we developed an ultra-high resolution 3D digitalized angioarchitectural map for rat brain, based on synchrotron radiation phase contrast imaging (SR-PCI) with pixel size of 5.92 μm. This approach provides a systematic and detailed view of the cerebrovascular anatomy at the micrometer level without any need for contrast agents. From qualitative and quantitative perspectives, the present 3D data provide a considerable insight into the spatial vascular network for whole rodent brain, particularly for functionally important regions of interest, such as the hippocampus, pre-frontal cerebral cortex and the corpus striatum. We extended these results to synchrotron-based virtual micro-endoscopy, thus revealing the trajectory of targeted vessels in 3D. The SR-PCI method for systematic visualization of cerebral microvasculature holds considerable promise for wider application in life sciences, including 3D micro-imaging in experimental models of neurodevelopmental and vascular disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus