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Ultra-high-resolution 3D digitalized imaging of the cerebral angioarchitecture in rats using synchrotron radiation.

Zhang MQ, Zhou L, Deng QF, Xie YY, Xiao TQ, Cao YZ, Zhang JW, Chen XM, Yin XZ, Xiao B - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: This approach provides a systematic and detailed view of the cerebrovascular anatomy at the micrometer level without any need for contrast agents.From qualitative and quantitative perspectives, the present 3D data provide a considerable insight into the spatial vascular network for whole rodent brain, particularly for functionally important regions of interest, such as the hippocampus, pre-frontal cerebral cortex and the corpus striatum.We extended these results to synchrotron-based virtual micro-endoscopy, thus revealing the trajectory of targeted vessels in 3D.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, China.

ABSTRACT
The angioarchitecture is a fundamental aspect of brain development and physiology. However, available imaging tools are unsuited for non-destructive cerebral mapping of the functionally important three-dimensional (3D) vascular microstructures. To address this issue, we developed an ultra-high resolution 3D digitalized angioarchitectural map for rat brain, based on synchrotron radiation phase contrast imaging (SR-PCI) with pixel size of 5.92 μm. This approach provides a systematic and detailed view of the cerebrovascular anatomy at the micrometer level without any need for contrast agents. From qualitative and quantitative perspectives, the present 3D data provide a considerable insight into the spatial vascular network for whole rodent brain, particularly for functionally important regions of interest, such as the hippocampus, pre-frontal cerebral cortex and the corpus striatum. We extended these results to synchrotron-based virtual micro-endoscopy, thus revealing the trajectory of targeted vessels in 3D. The SR-PCI method for systematic visualization of cerebral microvasculature holds considerable promise for wider application in life sciences, including 3D micro-imaging in experimental models of neurodevelopmental and vascular disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustration of hierarchical image processing.(A) Projection of rat brain by SR-PCI. (B) Local magnification of the region of interest denoted by a red box in (A). The small red frame in (B) indicates vessels with diameter of approximately 10 μm. (C) Series of 2D reconstructed slices using projections with image optimization. (D) 3D local tomography of angioarchitecture via superimposition of slices. (E) 3D reconstructed image of cerebral vasculature. (F) 3D skeleton of vascular network (in pseudocolour), with the region of interest denoted by a red frame. This area is shown with higher magnification in (G). The color gradients reflects vessel diameters, ranging from 10 μm (dark blue) to 150 μm (red). Scale bars: 200 μm (A,B).
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f1: Illustration of hierarchical image processing.(A) Projection of rat brain by SR-PCI. (B) Local magnification of the region of interest denoted by a red box in (A). The small red frame in (B) indicates vessels with diameter of approximately 10 μm. (C) Series of 2D reconstructed slices using projections with image optimization. (D) 3D local tomography of angioarchitecture via superimposition of slices. (E) 3D reconstructed image of cerebral vasculature. (F) 3D skeleton of vascular network (in pseudocolour), with the region of interest denoted by a red frame. This area is shown with higher magnification in (G). The color gradients reflects vessel diameters, ranging from 10 μm (dark blue) to 150 μm (red). Scale bars: 200 μm (A,B).

Mentions: We established a systematic and highly effective approach to the processing of large brain datasets derived from the original projections of optimized 2D slices to the ultimate 3D high resolution images. The initial 2D projections of ultra-high contrast were the important foundation for successive analysis. In Fig. 1A,B, the contours of the cerebral vasculature are clearly depicted via effects of edge enhancement. The smallest vessels that could be identified, as shown in the red frame, were approximately 10 μm in diameter. The optimized slices can provide microstructural information at different section levels (Fig. 1C). Subsequently, partial or integral slice-by-slice reconstruction can yield 3D images of the specific brain regions or of whole brain (Fig. 1D,E). The vascular network composite was then extracted and represented with pseudo-color for quantitative analysis (Fig. 1F). Enlargement of the image demonstrated that microvessels measuring <30 μm in the region of interest are arranged in a continuous and dense criss-cross pattern (Fig. 1G).


Ultra-high-resolution 3D digitalized imaging of the cerebral angioarchitecture in rats using synchrotron radiation.

Zhang MQ, Zhou L, Deng QF, Xie YY, Xiao TQ, Cao YZ, Zhang JW, Chen XM, Yin XZ, Xiao B - Sci Rep (2015)

Illustration of hierarchical image processing.(A) Projection of rat brain by SR-PCI. (B) Local magnification of the region of interest denoted by a red box in (A). The small red frame in (B) indicates vessels with diameter of approximately 10 μm. (C) Series of 2D reconstructed slices using projections with image optimization. (D) 3D local tomography of angioarchitecture via superimposition of slices. (E) 3D reconstructed image of cerebral vasculature. (F) 3D skeleton of vascular network (in pseudocolour), with the region of interest denoted by a red frame. This area is shown with higher magnification in (G). The color gradients reflects vessel diameters, ranging from 10 μm (dark blue) to 150 μm (red). Scale bars: 200 μm (A,B).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595735&req=5

f1: Illustration of hierarchical image processing.(A) Projection of rat brain by SR-PCI. (B) Local magnification of the region of interest denoted by a red box in (A). The small red frame in (B) indicates vessels with diameter of approximately 10 μm. (C) Series of 2D reconstructed slices using projections with image optimization. (D) 3D local tomography of angioarchitecture via superimposition of slices. (E) 3D reconstructed image of cerebral vasculature. (F) 3D skeleton of vascular network (in pseudocolour), with the region of interest denoted by a red frame. This area is shown with higher magnification in (G). The color gradients reflects vessel diameters, ranging from 10 μm (dark blue) to 150 μm (red). Scale bars: 200 μm (A,B).
Mentions: We established a systematic and highly effective approach to the processing of large brain datasets derived from the original projections of optimized 2D slices to the ultimate 3D high resolution images. The initial 2D projections of ultra-high contrast were the important foundation for successive analysis. In Fig. 1A,B, the contours of the cerebral vasculature are clearly depicted via effects of edge enhancement. The smallest vessels that could be identified, as shown in the red frame, were approximately 10 μm in diameter. The optimized slices can provide microstructural information at different section levels (Fig. 1C). Subsequently, partial or integral slice-by-slice reconstruction can yield 3D images of the specific brain regions or of whole brain (Fig. 1D,E). The vascular network composite was then extracted and represented with pseudo-color for quantitative analysis (Fig. 1F). Enlargement of the image demonstrated that microvessels measuring <30 μm in the region of interest are arranged in a continuous and dense criss-cross pattern (Fig. 1G).

Bottom Line: This approach provides a systematic and detailed view of the cerebrovascular anatomy at the micrometer level without any need for contrast agents.From qualitative and quantitative perspectives, the present 3D data provide a considerable insight into the spatial vascular network for whole rodent brain, particularly for functionally important regions of interest, such as the hippocampus, pre-frontal cerebral cortex and the corpus striatum.We extended these results to synchrotron-based virtual micro-endoscopy, thus revealing the trajectory of targeted vessels in 3D.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008, China.

ABSTRACT
The angioarchitecture is a fundamental aspect of brain development and physiology. However, available imaging tools are unsuited for non-destructive cerebral mapping of the functionally important three-dimensional (3D) vascular microstructures. To address this issue, we developed an ultra-high resolution 3D digitalized angioarchitectural map for rat brain, based on synchrotron radiation phase contrast imaging (SR-PCI) with pixel size of 5.92 μm. This approach provides a systematic and detailed view of the cerebrovascular anatomy at the micrometer level without any need for contrast agents. From qualitative and quantitative perspectives, the present 3D data provide a considerable insight into the spatial vascular network for whole rodent brain, particularly for functionally important regions of interest, such as the hippocampus, pre-frontal cerebral cortex and the corpus striatum. We extended these results to synchrotron-based virtual micro-endoscopy, thus revealing the trajectory of targeted vessels in 3D. The SR-PCI method for systematic visualization of cerebral microvasculature holds considerable promise for wider application in life sciences, including 3D micro-imaging in experimental models of neurodevelopmental and vascular disorders.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus