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Whispering-gallery nanocavity plasmon-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

Zhang J, Li J, Tang S, Fang Y, Wang J, Huang G, Liu R, Zheng L, Cui X, Mei Y - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The synergy effect in nature could enable fantastic improvement of functional properties and associated effects.The detection performance of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be highly strengthened under the cooperation with other factors.Such synchronous and coherent coupling between plasmonics and photonics could lead to new principle and design for various sub-wavelength optical devices, e.g. plasmonic waveguides and hyperbolic metamaterials.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
The synergy effect in nature could enable fantastic improvement of functional properties and associated effects. The detection performance of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be highly strengthened under the cooperation with other factors. Here, greatly-enhanced SERS detection is realized based on rolled-up tubular nano-resonators decorated with silver nanoparticles. The synergy effect between whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) and surface plasmon leads to an extra enhancement at the order of 10(5) compared to non-resonant flat SERS substrates, which can be well tuned by altering the diameter of micron- and nanotubes and the excitation laser wavelengths. Such synchronous and coherent coupling between plasmonics and photonics could lead to new principle and design for various sub-wavelength optical devices, e.g. plasmonic waveguides and hyperbolic metamaterials.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Small volume inspection of pesticide in the plasmon nanocavity.(a) A long and uniform rolled-up plasmon nanocavity. Scaler bars: left 10 μm; right 500 nm. (b) schematic illustration of the plasmon nanocavity working as an nanoscale optofluidic detector. (c) Microscopy image of small-volume pesticide solution pumped in the plasmon nanocavity. Scale bar is 3 μm. (d) Measured Raman spectra of parathion. Curve I, on flat Ag NP array using methanol as solvent; curve II, on flat Ag NP array using water as solvent; Curve III, in plasmon nanocavity using methanol as solvent; Curve IV, in plasmon nanocavity using water as solvent. Pesticide parathion concentration is 10−5 M.
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f4: Small volume inspection of pesticide in the plasmon nanocavity.(a) A long and uniform rolled-up plasmon nanocavity. Scaler bars: left 10 μm; right 500 nm. (b) schematic illustration of the plasmon nanocavity working as an nanoscale optofluidic detector. (c) Microscopy image of small-volume pesticide solution pumped in the plasmon nanocavity. Scale bar is 3 μm. (d) Measured Raman spectra of parathion. Curve I, on flat Ag NP array using methanol as solvent; curve II, on flat Ag NP array using water as solvent; Curve III, in plasmon nanocavity using methanol as solvent; Curve IV, in plasmon nanocavity using water as solvent. Pesticide parathion concentration is 10−5 M.

Mentions: Due to the advances in the strain-engineered self-rolling method, the nanocavity can reach a length of almost several centimeters and still maintain good uniformity in nanoscale diameter. Figure 4a displays a long and uniform rolled-up plasmonic nanocavity. The device thus could be easily integrated with other nanosystems, for example, to be transferred as an active nanoscale optofluidic sensor, as schematically illustrated in Fig. 4b. Such a combination enables an ideal sensing platform for trace chemical detection with several advantages, including fingerprinting, ultra-sensitivity and minimal use of samples/reagents. We show that this approach could be used for inspecting pesticide residues with ultra-small sample volumes. A liquid sample of the pesticide parathion solution is easily pumped in the nanocavity by the capillary effect. Figure 4c, corresponding to Supplementary Video, displays the solution of pesticide parathion pumped into the nanocavity. The calculated sample volume is only 0.02 pL. Figure 4 reveals that normal Raman spectra recorded on flat Ag NPs array using methanol (curve I) and water as solvent (curve II). No obvious band is observed by shedding the laser on the solution dispersed on the flat Ag NPs array. By pumping the sample solution into the plasmonic nanocavity, we can clearly detect two bands at 1,590  and 1,341 cm−1 (curve III and cure IV) that are characteristic bands of parathion residues1149. This demonstrates that such tubular plasmonic nanocavity could have tremendous scope as a simple-to-use, field-portable and cost-effective nanofluidic analyzer or single cell nanoprobe.


Whispering-gallery nanocavity plasmon-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

Zhang J, Li J, Tang S, Fang Y, Wang J, Huang G, Liu R, Zheng L, Cui X, Mei Y - Sci Rep (2015)

Small volume inspection of pesticide in the plasmon nanocavity.(a) A long and uniform rolled-up plasmon nanocavity. Scaler bars: left 10 μm; right 500 nm. (b) schematic illustration of the plasmon nanocavity working as an nanoscale optofluidic detector. (c) Microscopy image of small-volume pesticide solution pumped in the plasmon nanocavity. Scale bar is 3 μm. (d) Measured Raman spectra of parathion. Curve I, on flat Ag NP array using methanol as solvent; curve II, on flat Ag NP array using water as solvent; Curve III, in plasmon nanocavity using methanol as solvent; Curve IV, in plasmon nanocavity using water as solvent. Pesticide parathion concentration is 10−5 M.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595732&req=5

f4: Small volume inspection of pesticide in the plasmon nanocavity.(a) A long and uniform rolled-up plasmon nanocavity. Scaler bars: left 10 μm; right 500 nm. (b) schematic illustration of the plasmon nanocavity working as an nanoscale optofluidic detector. (c) Microscopy image of small-volume pesticide solution pumped in the plasmon nanocavity. Scale bar is 3 μm. (d) Measured Raman spectra of parathion. Curve I, on flat Ag NP array using methanol as solvent; curve II, on flat Ag NP array using water as solvent; Curve III, in plasmon nanocavity using methanol as solvent; Curve IV, in plasmon nanocavity using water as solvent. Pesticide parathion concentration is 10−5 M.
Mentions: Due to the advances in the strain-engineered self-rolling method, the nanocavity can reach a length of almost several centimeters and still maintain good uniformity in nanoscale diameter. Figure 4a displays a long and uniform rolled-up plasmonic nanocavity. The device thus could be easily integrated with other nanosystems, for example, to be transferred as an active nanoscale optofluidic sensor, as schematically illustrated in Fig. 4b. Such a combination enables an ideal sensing platform for trace chemical detection with several advantages, including fingerprinting, ultra-sensitivity and minimal use of samples/reagents. We show that this approach could be used for inspecting pesticide residues with ultra-small sample volumes. A liquid sample of the pesticide parathion solution is easily pumped in the nanocavity by the capillary effect. Figure 4c, corresponding to Supplementary Video, displays the solution of pesticide parathion pumped into the nanocavity. The calculated sample volume is only 0.02 pL. Figure 4 reveals that normal Raman spectra recorded on flat Ag NPs array using methanol (curve I) and water as solvent (curve II). No obvious band is observed by shedding the laser on the solution dispersed on the flat Ag NPs array. By pumping the sample solution into the plasmonic nanocavity, we can clearly detect two bands at 1,590  and 1,341 cm−1 (curve III and cure IV) that are characteristic bands of parathion residues1149. This demonstrates that such tubular plasmonic nanocavity could have tremendous scope as a simple-to-use, field-portable and cost-effective nanofluidic analyzer or single cell nanoprobe.

Bottom Line: The synergy effect in nature could enable fantastic improvement of functional properties and associated effects.The detection performance of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be highly strengthened under the cooperation with other factors.Such synchronous and coherent coupling between plasmonics and photonics could lead to new principle and design for various sub-wavelength optical devices, e.g. plasmonic waveguides and hyperbolic metamaterials.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Materials Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
The synergy effect in nature could enable fantastic improvement of functional properties and associated effects. The detection performance of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be highly strengthened under the cooperation with other factors. Here, greatly-enhanced SERS detection is realized based on rolled-up tubular nano-resonators decorated with silver nanoparticles. The synergy effect between whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) and surface plasmon leads to an extra enhancement at the order of 10(5) compared to non-resonant flat SERS substrates, which can be well tuned by altering the diameter of micron- and nanotubes and the excitation laser wavelengths. Such synchronous and coherent coupling between plasmonics and photonics could lead to new principle and design for various sub-wavelength optical devices, e.g. plasmonic waveguides and hyperbolic metamaterials.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus