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Household physical activity and cancer risk: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

Shi Y, Li T, Wang Y, Zhou L, Qin Q, Yin J, Wei S, Liu L, Nie S - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Random-effect models were conducted to estimate the summary relative risks (RRs), nonlinear or linear dose-response meta-analyses were performed to estimate the trend from the correlated log RR estimates across levels of household physical activity quantitatively.Total cancer risks were reduced 16% among the people with highest household physical activity compared to those with lowest household physical activity (RR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.76-0.93).These findings provide quantitative data supporting household physical activity is associated with decreased cancer risk in dose-response effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.

ABSTRACT
Controversial results of the association between household physical activity and cancer risk were reported among previous epidemiological studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the relationship of household physical activity and cancer risk quantitatively, especially in dose-response manner. PubMed, Embase, Web of science and the Cochrane Library were searched for cohort or case-control studies that examined the association between household physical activity and cancer risks. Random-effect models were conducted to estimate the summary relative risks (RRs), nonlinear or linear dose-response meta-analyses were performed to estimate the trend from the correlated log RR estimates across levels of household physical activity quantitatively. Totally, 30 studies including 41 comparisons met the inclusion criteria. Total cancer risks were reduced 16% among the people with highest household physical activity compared to those with lowest household physical activity (RR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.76-0.93). The dose-response analyses indicated an inverse linear association between household physical activity and cancer risk. The relative risk was 0.98 (95% CI = 0.97-1.00) for per additional 10 MET-hours/week and it was 0.99 (95% CI = 0.98-0.99) for per 1 hour/week increase. These findings provide quantitative data supporting household physical activity is associated with decreased cancer risk in dose-response effect.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plots of linear dose–response meta-analysis by MET-hour/week on the relationship between household physical activity and cancer risk.
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f4: Forest plots of linear dose–response meta-analysis by MET-hour/week on the relationship between household physical activity and cancer risk.

Mentions: Among the 20 comparisons6918252628293133 estimating household physical activity categories quantitatively in the form of energy expenditure, a total of 19 comparisons69182628293133 were included in the dose-response analysis by MET-hour/week. One study25 was excluded due to lack of category-specific number of cases and person-year/non-cases. Restricted cubic splines model indicated linear association between household physical activity and cancer risk (Pfor non-linearity = 0.89). In the linear dose-response meta-analysis, the summary relative risk for each 10 MET-hours/week increase in household physical activity was 0.98 (95% CI = 0.97–1.00, I2for heterogeneity = 79.3%; Fig. 4). The summary relative risk of a 10 MET-hours/week increment of household physical activity was 0.99 (95% CI = 0.99–1.00, I2for heterogeneity = 5.1%) for cohort studies and 0.98 (95% CI = 0.94–1.01, I2for heterogeneity = 83.3%) for case-control studies, respectively. The pooled relative risk of a 10 MET-hours/week increment of household physical activity was 1.03 (95% CI = 0.97–1.09, I2for heterogeneity = 58.5%) for men and 0.98 (95% CI = 0.96–0.99, I2for heterogeneity = 82.7%) for women, respectively. By study location, the relative risk of a 10 MET-hours/week increment of household physical activity was 0.99 (95% CI = 0.98–1.01, I2for heterogeneity = 58.9%) and 0.98 (95% CI = 0.95–1.02, I2for heterogeneity = 74.9%) for cancer in Europe and America, respectively.


Household physical activity and cancer risk: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of epidemiological studies.

Shi Y, Li T, Wang Y, Zhou L, Qin Q, Yin J, Wei S, Liu L, Nie S - Sci Rep (2015)

Forest plots of linear dose–response meta-analysis by MET-hour/week on the relationship between household physical activity and cancer risk.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595663&req=5

f4: Forest plots of linear dose–response meta-analysis by MET-hour/week on the relationship between household physical activity and cancer risk.
Mentions: Among the 20 comparisons6918252628293133 estimating household physical activity categories quantitatively in the form of energy expenditure, a total of 19 comparisons69182628293133 were included in the dose-response analysis by MET-hour/week. One study25 was excluded due to lack of category-specific number of cases and person-year/non-cases. Restricted cubic splines model indicated linear association between household physical activity and cancer risk (Pfor non-linearity = 0.89). In the linear dose-response meta-analysis, the summary relative risk for each 10 MET-hours/week increase in household physical activity was 0.98 (95% CI = 0.97–1.00, I2for heterogeneity = 79.3%; Fig. 4). The summary relative risk of a 10 MET-hours/week increment of household physical activity was 0.99 (95% CI = 0.99–1.00, I2for heterogeneity = 5.1%) for cohort studies and 0.98 (95% CI = 0.94–1.01, I2for heterogeneity = 83.3%) for case-control studies, respectively. The pooled relative risk of a 10 MET-hours/week increment of household physical activity was 1.03 (95% CI = 0.97–1.09, I2for heterogeneity = 58.5%) for men and 0.98 (95% CI = 0.96–0.99, I2for heterogeneity = 82.7%) for women, respectively. By study location, the relative risk of a 10 MET-hours/week increment of household physical activity was 0.99 (95% CI = 0.98–1.01, I2for heterogeneity = 58.9%) and 0.98 (95% CI = 0.95–1.02, I2for heterogeneity = 74.9%) for cancer in Europe and America, respectively.

Bottom Line: Random-effect models were conducted to estimate the summary relative risks (RRs), nonlinear or linear dose-response meta-analyses were performed to estimate the trend from the correlated log RR estimates across levels of household physical activity quantitatively.Total cancer risks were reduced 16% among the people with highest household physical activity compared to those with lowest household physical activity (RR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.76-0.93).These findings provide quantitative data supporting household physical activity is associated with decreased cancer risk in dose-response effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and the Ministry of Education Key Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.

ABSTRACT
Controversial results of the association between household physical activity and cancer risk were reported among previous epidemiological studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to investigate the relationship of household physical activity and cancer risk quantitatively, especially in dose-response manner. PubMed, Embase, Web of science and the Cochrane Library were searched for cohort or case-control studies that examined the association between household physical activity and cancer risks. Random-effect models were conducted to estimate the summary relative risks (RRs), nonlinear or linear dose-response meta-analyses were performed to estimate the trend from the correlated log RR estimates across levels of household physical activity quantitatively. Totally, 30 studies including 41 comparisons met the inclusion criteria. Total cancer risks were reduced 16% among the people with highest household physical activity compared to those with lowest household physical activity (RR = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.76-0.93). The dose-response analyses indicated an inverse linear association between household physical activity and cancer risk. The relative risk was 0.98 (95% CI = 0.97-1.00) for per additional 10 MET-hours/week and it was 0.99 (95% CI = 0.98-0.99) for per 1 hour/week increase. These findings provide quantitative data supporting household physical activity is associated with decreased cancer risk in dose-response effect.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus