Limits...
Habitat fragmentation is associated to gut microbiota diversity of an endangered primate: implications for conservation.

Barelli C, Albanese D, Donati C, Pindo M, Dallago C, Rovero F, Cavalieri D, Tuohy KM, Hauffe HC, De Filippo C - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The expansion of agriculture is shrinking pristine forest areas worldwide, jeopardizing the persistence of their wild inhabitants.We sampled seven social groups inhabiting two forests (disturbed vs. undisturbed) in the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania.Functional analysis suggests that such variation may be associated with food plant diversity in natural versus human-modified habitats, requiring metabolic pathways to digest xenobiotics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biodiversity and Molecular Ecology, Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Via E. Mach 1, 38010 S. Michele all'Adige, Trento, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The expansion of agriculture is shrinking pristine forest areas worldwide, jeopardizing the persistence of their wild inhabitants. The Udzungwa red colobus monkey (Procolobus gordonorum) is among the most threatened primate species in Africa. Primarily arboreal and highly sensitive to hunting and habitat destruction, they provide a critical model to understanding whether anthropogenic disturbance impacts gut microbiota diversity. We sampled seven social groups inhabiting two forests (disturbed vs. undisturbed) in the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania. While Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae dominated in all individuals, reflecting their role in extracting energy from folivorous diets, analysis of genus composition showed a marked diversification across habitats, with gut microbiota α-diversity significantly higher in the undisturbed forest. Functional analysis suggests that such variation may be associated with food plant diversity in natural versus human-modified habitats, requiring metabolic pathways to digest xenobiotics. Thus, the effects of changes in gut microbiota should not be ignored to conserve endangered populations.

No MeSH data available.


PhyloRelief analysis (Magombera vs. Mwanihana) guided by the Weighted UniFrac distance.Z-scores of the relative abundances are shown for significant OTUs (PhyloRelief selected clades with FDR-corrected P < 0.01, Kruskal-Wallis test). OTUs are classified in Phylum/Class/Order/Family/Genus format on the left side. Ultrametric pruned phylogenetic tree is shown on the right side.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595646&req=5

f4: PhyloRelief analysis (Magombera vs. Mwanihana) guided by the Weighted UniFrac distance.Z-scores of the relative abundances are shown for significant OTUs (PhyloRelief selected clades with FDR-corrected P < 0.01, Kruskal-Wallis test). OTUs are classified in Phylum/Class/Order/Family/Genus format on the left side. Ultrametric pruned phylogenetic tree is shown on the right side.

Mentions: We also found significant differences in the relative abundance of the genus Faecalibacterium (higher in Ma) and of Halella and Bacteroides (higher in Mw, P < 0.05, Supplementary Fig. S3). To define more precisely the taxa that are driving the differentiation of the microbiota of the two forests, we performed an analysis based on PhyloRelief36, a recent phylogenetic-based feature weighting algorithm for metagenomic data. The method unambiguously groups the relevant taxa into clades without relying on pre-defined taxonomic categories. The phylogenetic clades are weighted and ranked according to their abundance measuring their contribution to the differentiation of the classes of samples. The most relevant selected clades (Kruskal-Wallis test, P < 0.01) show that, beside these more evident differences, there is a general rearrangement of the taxa within the Bacteroidales and Clostridiales order, resulting in a lower diversity of the microbiota of the Ma individuals (Fig. 4).


Habitat fragmentation is associated to gut microbiota diversity of an endangered primate: implications for conservation.

Barelli C, Albanese D, Donati C, Pindo M, Dallago C, Rovero F, Cavalieri D, Tuohy KM, Hauffe HC, De Filippo C - Sci Rep (2015)

PhyloRelief analysis (Magombera vs. Mwanihana) guided by the Weighted UniFrac distance.Z-scores of the relative abundances are shown for significant OTUs (PhyloRelief selected clades with FDR-corrected P < 0.01, Kruskal-Wallis test). OTUs are classified in Phylum/Class/Order/Family/Genus format on the left side. Ultrametric pruned phylogenetic tree is shown on the right side.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595646&req=5

f4: PhyloRelief analysis (Magombera vs. Mwanihana) guided by the Weighted UniFrac distance.Z-scores of the relative abundances are shown for significant OTUs (PhyloRelief selected clades with FDR-corrected P < 0.01, Kruskal-Wallis test). OTUs are classified in Phylum/Class/Order/Family/Genus format on the left side. Ultrametric pruned phylogenetic tree is shown on the right side.
Mentions: We also found significant differences in the relative abundance of the genus Faecalibacterium (higher in Ma) and of Halella and Bacteroides (higher in Mw, P < 0.05, Supplementary Fig. S3). To define more precisely the taxa that are driving the differentiation of the microbiota of the two forests, we performed an analysis based on PhyloRelief36, a recent phylogenetic-based feature weighting algorithm for metagenomic data. The method unambiguously groups the relevant taxa into clades without relying on pre-defined taxonomic categories. The phylogenetic clades are weighted and ranked according to their abundance measuring their contribution to the differentiation of the classes of samples. The most relevant selected clades (Kruskal-Wallis test, P < 0.01) show that, beside these more evident differences, there is a general rearrangement of the taxa within the Bacteroidales and Clostridiales order, resulting in a lower diversity of the microbiota of the Ma individuals (Fig. 4).

Bottom Line: The expansion of agriculture is shrinking pristine forest areas worldwide, jeopardizing the persistence of their wild inhabitants.We sampled seven social groups inhabiting two forests (disturbed vs. undisturbed) in the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania.Functional analysis suggests that such variation may be associated with food plant diversity in natural versus human-modified habitats, requiring metabolic pathways to digest xenobiotics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biodiversity and Molecular Ecology, Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Via E. Mach 1, 38010 S. Michele all'Adige, Trento, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The expansion of agriculture is shrinking pristine forest areas worldwide, jeopardizing the persistence of their wild inhabitants. The Udzungwa red colobus monkey (Procolobus gordonorum) is among the most threatened primate species in Africa. Primarily arboreal and highly sensitive to hunting and habitat destruction, they provide a critical model to understanding whether anthropogenic disturbance impacts gut microbiota diversity. We sampled seven social groups inhabiting two forests (disturbed vs. undisturbed) in the Udzungwa Mountains of Tanzania. While Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae dominated in all individuals, reflecting their role in extracting energy from folivorous diets, analysis of genus composition showed a marked diversification across habitats, with gut microbiota α-diversity significantly higher in the undisturbed forest. Functional analysis suggests that such variation may be associated with food plant diversity in natural versus human-modified habitats, requiring metabolic pathways to digest xenobiotics. Thus, the effects of changes in gut microbiota should not be ignored to conserve endangered populations.

No MeSH data available.