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ERrrr…where are the progenitors? Hormone receptors and mammary cell heterogeneity.

Tornillo G, Smalley MJ - J Mammary Gland Biol Neoplasia (2015)

Bottom Line: Intriguingly, although circulating hormones can be directly sensed only by a subset of mammary cells, they also regulate the behaviour of cells lacking their cognate receptors through paracrine mechanisms.Thus, mapping the hormonal signalling network on to the emerging mammary cell hierarchy appears to be a difficult task.Nevertheless, a first step towards a better understanding is the characterization of the hormone receptor expression pattern across individual cell types in the mammary epithelium.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute, School of Biosciences, Cardiff, CF24 4HQ, UK. TornilloG@cardiff.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
The mammary epithelium is a highly heterogenous and dynamic tissue that includes a range of cell types with varying levels of proliferative capacity and differentiation potential, from stem to committed progenitor and mature cells. Generation of mature cells through expansion and specification of immature precursors is driven by hormonal and local stimuli. Intriguingly, although circulating hormones can be directly sensed only by a subset of mammary cells, they also regulate the behaviour of cells lacking their cognate receptors through paracrine mechanisms. Thus, mapping the hormonal signalling network on to the emerging mammary cell hierarchy appears to be a difficult task. Nevertheless, a first step towards a better understanding is the characterization of the hormone receptor expression pattern across individual cell types in the mammary epithelium. Here we review the most relevant findings on the cellular distribution of hormone receptors in the mammary gland, taking into account differences between mice and humans, the methods employed to assess receptor expression as well as the variety of approaches used to resolve the mammary cell heterogeneity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Position and functions of mammary hormone receptor-positive epithelial cells. In response to hormonal stimulation, hormone receptor-positive cells secrete paracrine factors, which induce proliferation of hormone receptor-negative cells. A minor proportion of hormone receptor-positive cells proliferate. Note that there is at present a debate in the field as to whether transplantable MaSCs (MRUs) are a distinct population in the basal epithelium or rather are a subset of myoepithelial cells
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Fig2: Position and functions of mammary hormone receptor-positive epithelial cells. In response to hormonal stimulation, hormone receptor-positive cells secrete paracrine factors, which induce proliferation of hormone receptor-negative cells. A minor proportion of hormone receptor-positive cells proliferate. Note that there is at present a debate in the field as to whether transplantable MaSCs (MRUs) are a distinct population in the basal epithelium or rather are a subset of myoepithelial cells

Mentions: Significant advances have been made towards the definition of a high-resolution map of hormone receptor expression in the mammary epithelium. Almost two decades ago the analysis of frequency, distribution and proliferation of hormone receptor-positive cells in situ suggested a paracrine mechanism of hormone action (Fig. 2), but provided limited information about the identity and functional/lineage relationships of these cells or the distinct molecular mechanisms.Fig. 2


ERrrr…where are the progenitors? Hormone receptors and mammary cell heterogeneity.

Tornillo G, Smalley MJ - J Mammary Gland Biol Neoplasia (2015)

Position and functions of mammary hormone receptor-positive epithelial cells. In response to hormonal stimulation, hormone receptor-positive cells secrete paracrine factors, which induce proliferation of hormone receptor-negative cells. A minor proportion of hormone receptor-positive cells proliferate. Note that there is at present a debate in the field as to whether transplantable MaSCs (MRUs) are a distinct population in the basal epithelium or rather are a subset of myoepithelial cells
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595529&req=5

Fig2: Position and functions of mammary hormone receptor-positive epithelial cells. In response to hormonal stimulation, hormone receptor-positive cells secrete paracrine factors, which induce proliferation of hormone receptor-negative cells. A minor proportion of hormone receptor-positive cells proliferate. Note that there is at present a debate in the field as to whether transplantable MaSCs (MRUs) are a distinct population in the basal epithelium or rather are a subset of myoepithelial cells
Mentions: Significant advances have been made towards the definition of a high-resolution map of hormone receptor expression in the mammary epithelium. Almost two decades ago the analysis of frequency, distribution and proliferation of hormone receptor-positive cells in situ suggested a paracrine mechanism of hormone action (Fig. 2), but provided limited information about the identity and functional/lineage relationships of these cells or the distinct molecular mechanisms.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Intriguingly, although circulating hormones can be directly sensed only by a subset of mammary cells, they also regulate the behaviour of cells lacking their cognate receptors through paracrine mechanisms.Thus, mapping the hormonal signalling network on to the emerging mammary cell hierarchy appears to be a difficult task.Nevertheless, a first step towards a better understanding is the characterization of the hormone receptor expression pattern across individual cell types in the mammary epithelium.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute, School of Biosciences, Cardiff, CF24 4HQ, UK. TornilloG@cardiff.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
The mammary epithelium is a highly heterogenous and dynamic tissue that includes a range of cell types with varying levels of proliferative capacity and differentiation potential, from stem to committed progenitor and mature cells. Generation of mature cells through expansion and specification of immature precursors is driven by hormonal and local stimuli. Intriguingly, although circulating hormones can be directly sensed only by a subset of mammary cells, they also regulate the behaviour of cells lacking their cognate receptors through paracrine mechanisms. Thus, mapping the hormonal signalling network on to the emerging mammary cell hierarchy appears to be a difficult task. Nevertheless, a first step towards a better understanding is the characterization of the hormone receptor expression pattern across individual cell types in the mammary epithelium. Here we review the most relevant findings on the cellular distribution of hormone receptors in the mammary gland, taking into account differences between mice and humans, the methods employed to assess receptor expression as well as the variety of approaches used to resolve the mammary cell heterogeneity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus