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Aberrant functional connectivity of default-mode network in type 2 diabetes patients.

Cui Y, Jiao Y, Chen HJ, Ding J, Luo B, Peng CY, Ju SH, Teng GJ - Eur Radiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Z-maps of both sub-networks were compared between the two groups and correlated with each clinical variable.The decreased connectivity in the posterior part was significantly correlated with the score on Complex Figure Test-delay recall test (r = 0.359, p = 0.020), the time spent on Trail-Making Test-part B (r = -0.346, p = 0.025) and the insulin resistance level (r = -0.404, p = 0.024).Dissociation pattern in the default-mode network was found in diabetic patients, which might provide powerful new insights into the neural mechanisms that underlie the diabetes-related cognitive decline. • Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with impaired cognition • Default- mode network plays a central role in maintaining normal cognition • Network connectivity within the default mode was disrupted in type 2 diabetes patients • Decreased network connectivity was correlated with cognitive performance and insulin resistance level • Disrupted default-mode network might explain the impaired cognition in diabetic population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing, 210009, Jiangsu, China.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk for dementia. Patients with impaired cognition often show default-mode network disruption. We aimed to investigate the integrity of a default-mode network in diabetic patients by using independent component analysis, and to explore the relationship between network abnormalities, neurocognitive performance and diabetic variables.

Methods: Forty-two patients with type 2 diabetes and 42 well-matched healthy controls were included and underwent resting-state functional MRI in a 3 Tesla unit. Independent component analysis was adopted to extract the default-mode network, including its anterior and posterior components. Z-maps of both sub-networks were compared between the two groups and correlated with each clinical variable.

Results: Patients showed increased connectivity around the medial prefrontal cortex in the anterior sub-network, but decreased connectivity around the posterior cingulate cortex in the posterior sub-network. The decreased connectivity in the posterior part was significantly correlated with the score on Complex Figure Test-delay recall test (r = 0.359, p = 0.020), the time spent on Trail-Making Test-part B (r = -0.346, p = 0.025) and the insulin resistance level (r = -0.404, p = 0.024).

Conclusion: Dissociation pattern in the default-mode network was found in diabetic patients, which might provide powerful new insights into the neural mechanisms that underlie the diabetes-related cognitive decline.

Key points: • Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with impaired cognition • Default- mode network plays a central role in maintaining normal cognition • Network connectivity within the default mode was disrupted in type 2 diabetes patients • Decreased network connectivity was correlated with cognitive performance and insulin resistance level • Disrupted default-mode network might explain the impaired cognition in diabetic population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Default-mode network (DMN) connectivity differences among different patients sub-groups and healthy controls. (A). The mean FC values extracted from the frontal regions in the diabetic group were significantly higher than the control group, while the mean FC values of the occipital lobe were significantly lower. There is a trend that patients with insulin treatment suffered more functional alterations than those without, although the differences were not significant. (B) The mean FC value extracted from the frontal and the occipital lobe did not differ between the patients with and without diabetic complications. FC, functional connectivity; RSFG, right superior frontal gyrus; LSFG, left superior frontal gyrus; PCC, posterior cingulate cortex
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Fig3: Default-mode network (DMN) connectivity differences among different patients sub-groups and healthy controls. (A). The mean FC values extracted from the frontal regions in the diabetic group were significantly higher than the control group, while the mean FC values of the occipital lobe were significantly lower. There is a trend that patients with insulin treatment suffered more functional alterations than those without, although the differences were not significant. (B) The mean FC value extracted from the frontal and the occipital lobe did not differ between the patients with and without diabetic complications. FC, functional connectivity; RSFG, right superior frontal gyrus; LSFG, left superior frontal gyrus; PCC, posterior cingulate cortex

Mentions: DMN connectivity map was further compared between patients under insulin and non-insulin treatment, and between those with different diabetic complications. No significant difference was observed among these sub-groups of patients. Similarly, FC values extracted from the frontal region and the posterior regions also showed no significant difference among these sub-groups (Fig. 3A and B). However, insulin-treated patients suffered more functional alterations than those under non-insulin therapy, as shown in Fig. 3A.Fig. 3


Aberrant functional connectivity of default-mode network in type 2 diabetes patients.

Cui Y, Jiao Y, Chen HJ, Ding J, Luo B, Peng CY, Ju SH, Teng GJ - Eur Radiol (2015)

Default-mode network (DMN) connectivity differences among different patients sub-groups and healthy controls. (A). The mean FC values extracted from the frontal regions in the diabetic group were significantly higher than the control group, while the mean FC values of the occipital lobe were significantly lower. There is a trend that patients with insulin treatment suffered more functional alterations than those without, although the differences were not significant. (B) The mean FC value extracted from the frontal and the occipital lobe did not differ between the patients with and without diabetic complications. FC, functional connectivity; RSFG, right superior frontal gyrus; LSFG, left superior frontal gyrus; PCC, posterior cingulate cortex
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig3: Default-mode network (DMN) connectivity differences among different patients sub-groups and healthy controls. (A). The mean FC values extracted from the frontal regions in the diabetic group were significantly higher than the control group, while the mean FC values of the occipital lobe were significantly lower. There is a trend that patients with insulin treatment suffered more functional alterations than those without, although the differences were not significant. (B) The mean FC value extracted from the frontal and the occipital lobe did not differ between the patients with and without diabetic complications. FC, functional connectivity; RSFG, right superior frontal gyrus; LSFG, left superior frontal gyrus; PCC, posterior cingulate cortex
Mentions: DMN connectivity map was further compared between patients under insulin and non-insulin treatment, and between those with different diabetic complications. No significant difference was observed among these sub-groups of patients. Similarly, FC values extracted from the frontal region and the posterior regions also showed no significant difference among these sub-groups (Fig. 3A and B). However, insulin-treated patients suffered more functional alterations than those under non-insulin therapy, as shown in Fig. 3A.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Z-maps of both sub-networks were compared between the two groups and correlated with each clinical variable.The decreased connectivity in the posterior part was significantly correlated with the score on Complex Figure Test-delay recall test (r = 0.359, p = 0.020), the time spent on Trail-Making Test-part B (r = -0.346, p = 0.025) and the insulin resistance level (r = -0.404, p = 0.024).Dissociation pattern in the default-mode network was found in diabetic patients, which might provide powerful new insights into the neural mechanisms that underlie the diabetes-related cognitive decline. • Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with impaired cognition • Default- mode network plays a central role in maintaining normal cognition • Network connectivity within the default mode was disrupted in type 2 diabetes patients • Decreased network connectivity was correlated with cognitive performance and insulin resistance level • Disrupted default-mode network might explain the impaired cognition in diabetic population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing, 210009, Jiangsu, China.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk for dementia. Patients with impaired cognition often show default-mode network disruption. We aimed to investigate the integrity of a default-mode network in diabetic patients by using independent component analysis, and to explore the relationship between network abnormalities, neurocognitive performance and diabetic variables.

Methods: Forty-two patients with type 2 diabetes and 42 well-matched healthy controls were included and underwent resting-state functional MRI in a 3 Tesla unit. Independent component analysis was adopted to extract the default-mode network, including its anterior and posterior components. Z-maps of both sub-networks were compared between the two groups and correlated with each clinical variable.

Results: Patients showed increased connectivity around the medial prefrontal cortex in the anterior sub-network, but decreased connectivity around the posterior cingulate cortex in the posterior sub-network. The decreased connectivity in the posterior part was significantly correlated with the score on Complex Figure Test-delay recall test (r = 0.359, p = 0.020), the time spent on Trail-Making Test-part B (r = -0.346, p = 0.025) and the insulin resistance level (r = -0.404, p = 0.024).

Conclusion: Dissociation pattern in the default-mode network was found in diabetic patients, which might provide powerful new insights into the neural mechanisms that underlie the diabetes-related cognitive decline.

Key points: • Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with impaired cognition • Default- mode network plays a central role in maintaining normal cognition • Network connectivity within the default mode was disrupted in type 2 diabetes patients • Decreased network connectivity was correlated with cognitive performance and insulin resistance level • Disrupted default-mode network might explain the impaired cognition in diabetic population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus