Limits...
Aberrant functional connectivity of default-mode network in type 2 diabetes patients.

Cui Y, Jiao Y, Chen HJ, Ding J, Luo B, Peng CY, Ju SH, Teng GJ - Eur Radiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Z-maps of both sub-networks were compared between the two groups and correlated with each clinical variable.The decreased connectivity in the posterior part was significantly correlated with the score on Complex Figure Test-delay recall test (r = 0.359, p = 0.020), the time spent on Trail-Making Test-part B (r = -0.346, p = 0.025) and the insulin resistance level (r = -0.404, p = 0.024).Dissociation pattern in the default-mode network was found in diabetic patients, which might provide powerful new insights into the neural mechanisms that underlie the diabetes-related cognitive decline. • Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with impaired cognition • Default- mode network plays a central role in maintaining normal cognition • Network connectivity within the default mode was disrupted in type 2 diabetes patients • Decreased network connectivity was correlated with cognitive performance and insulin resistance level • Disrupted default-mode network might explain the impaired cognition in diabetic population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing, 210009, Jiangsu, China.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk for dementia. Patients with impaired cognition often show default-mode network disruption. We aimed to investigate the integrity of a default-mode network in diabetic patients by using independent component analysis, and to explore the relationship between network abnormalities, neurocognitive performance and diabetic variables.

Methods: Forty-two patients with type 2 diabetes and 42 well-matched healthy controls were included and underwent resting-state functional MRI in a 3 Tesla unit. Independent component analysis was adopted to extract the default-mode network, including its anterior and posterior components. Z-maps of both sub-networks were compared between the two groups and correlated with each clinical variable.

Results: Patients showed increased connectivity around the medial prefrontal cortex in the anterior sub-network, but decreased connectivity around the posterior cingulate cortex in the posterior sub-network. The decreased connectivity in the posterior part was significantly correlated with the score on Complex Figure Test-delay recall test (r = 0.359, p = 0.020), the time spent on Trail-Making Test-part B (r = -0.346, p = 0.025) and the insulin resistance level (r = -0.404, p = 0.024).

Conclusion: Dissociation pattern in the default-mode network was found in diabetic patients, which might provide powerful new insights into the neural mechanisms that underlie the diabetes-related cognitive decline.

Key points: • Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with impaired cognition • Default- mode network plays a central role in maintaining normal cognition • Network connectivity within the default mode was disrupted in type 2 diabetes patients • Decreased network connectivity was correlated with cognitive performance and insulin resistance level • Disrupted default-mode network might explain the impaired cognition in diabetic population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of default-mode network (DMN) sub-networks between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and healthy controls. (A) Compared with the healthy controls, patients with T2DM showed significantly increased FC (red colour) within the anterior DMN sub-network, predominantly in the right and the left SFG. (B) Decreased FC (blue colour) was found in the posterior sub-network of the DMN, which was mainly located around the retrosplenial regions such as the PCC and the precuneus. Pictures on the left column are masks of the two sub-components of DMN, obtained by combining results of one-sample t-test in each group, thresholding at P < 0.05 (FDR corrected). Colour scale represents t-values. FC, functional connectivity; SFG, superior frontal gyrus; PCC, posterior cingulate cortex
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595523&req=5

Fig2: Comparison of default-mode network (DMN) sub-networks between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and healthy controls. (A) Compared with the healthy controls, patients with T2DM showed significantly increased FC (red colour) within the anterior DMN sub-network, predominantly in the right and the left SFG. (B) Decreased FC (blue colour) was found in the posterior sub-network of the DMN, which was mainly located around the retrosplenial regions such as the PCC and the precuneus. Pictures on the left column are masks of the two sub-components of DMN, obtained by combining results of one-sample t-test in each group, thresholding at P < 0.05 (FDR corrected). Colour scale represents t-values. FC, functional connectivity; SFG, superior frontal gyrus; PCC, posterior cingulate cortex

Mentions: Compared with the healthy controls, patients showed increased FC in the anterior DMN region and decreased FC in the posterior DMN region (P < 0.05, AlphaSim corrected). Specifically, the increased connectivity mainly involved bilateral superior frontal gyrus (SFG) (Fig. 2A). The decreased connectivity included the PCC and the precuneus (Fig. 2B). A detailed list of brain regions with aberrant FC in each sub-network is presented in Table 2.Fig. 2


Aberrant functional connectivity of default-mode network in type 2 diabetes patients.

Cui Y, Jiao Y, Chen HJ, Ding J, Luo B, Peng CY, Ju SH, Teng GJ - Eur Radiol (2015)

Comparison of default-mode network (DMN) sub-networks between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and healthy controls. (A) Compared with the healthy controls, patients with T2DM showed significantly increased FC (red colour) within the anterior DMN sub-network, predominantly in the right and the left SFG. (B) Decreased FC (blue colour) was found in the posterior sub-network of the DMN, which was mainly located around the retrosplenial regions such as the PCC and the precuneus. Pictures on the left column are masks of the two sub-components of DMN, obtained by combining results of one-sample t-test in each group, thresholding at P < 0.05 (FDR corrected). Colour scale represents t-values. FC, functional connectivity; SFG, superior frontal gyrus; PCC, posterior cingulate cortex
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595523&req=5

Fig2: Comparison of default-mode network (DMN) sub-networks between type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and healthy controls. (A) Compared with the healthy controls, patients with T2DM showed significantly increased FC (red colour) within the anterior DMN sub-network, predominantly in the right and the left SFG. (B) Decreased FC (blue colour) was found in the posterior sub-network of the DMN, which was mainly located around the retrosplenial regions such as the PCC and the precuneus. Pictures on the left column are masks of the two sub-components of DMN, obtained by combining results of one-sample t-test in each group, thresholding at P < 0.05 (FDR corrected). Colour scale represents t-values. FC, functional connectivity; SFG, superior frontal gyrus; PCC, posterior cingulate cortex
Mentions: Compared with the healthy controls, patients showed increased FC in the anterior DMN region and decreased FC in the posterior DMN region (P < 0.05, AlphaSim corrected). Specifically, the increased connectivity mainly involved bilateral superior frontal gyrus (SFG) (Fig. 2A). The decreased connectivity included the PCC and the precuneus (Fig. 2B). A detailed list of brain regions with aberrant FC in each sub-network is presented in Table 2.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Z-maps of both sub-networks were compared between the two groups and correlated with each clinical variable.The decreased connectivity in the posterior part was significantly correlated with the score on Complex Figure Test-delay recall test (r = 0.359, p = 0.020), the time spent on Trail-Making Test-part B (r = -0.346, p = 0.025) and the insulin resistance level (r = -0.404, p = 0.024).Dissociation pattern in the default-mode network was found in diabetic patients, which might provide powerful new insights into the neural mechanisms that underlie the diabetes-related cognitive decline. • Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with impaired cognition • Default- mode network plays a central role in maintaining normal cognition • Network connectivity within the default mode was disrupted in type 2 diabetes patients • Decreased network connectivity was correlated with cognitive performance and insulin resistance level • Disrupted default-mode network might explain the impaired cognition in diabetic population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology, Zhongda Hospital, Medical School of Southeast University, 87 Dingjiaqiao Road, Nanjing, 210009, Jiangsu, China.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk for dementia. Patients with impaired cognition often show default-mode network disruption. We aimed to investigate the integrity of a default-mode network in diabetic patients by using independent component analysis, and to explore the relationship between network abnormalities, neurocognitive performance and diabetic variables.

Methods: Forty-two patients with type 2 diabetes and 42 well-matched healthy controls were included and underwent resting-state functional MRI in a 3 Tesla unit. Independent component analysis was adopted to extract the default-mode network, including its anterior and posterior components. Z-maps of both sub-networks were compared between the two groups and correlated with each clinical variable.

Results: Patients showed increased connectivity around the medial prefrontal cortex in the anterior sub-network, but decreased connectivity around the posterior cingulate cortex in the posterior sub-network. The decreased connectivity in the posterior part was significantly correlated with the score on Complex Figure Test-delay recall test (r = 0.359, p = 0.020), the time spent on Trail-Making Test-part B (r = -0.346, p = 0.025) and the insulin resistance level (r = -0.404, p = 0.024).

Conclusion: Dissociation pattern in the default-mode network was found in diabetic patients, which might provide powerful new insights into the neural mechanisms that underlie the diabetes-related cognitive decline.

Key points: • Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with impaired cognition • Default- mode network plays a central role in maintaining normal cognition • Network connectivity within the default mode was disrupted in type 2 diabetes patients • Decreased network connectivity was correlated with cognitive performance and insulin resistance level • Disrupted default-mode network might explain the impaired cognition in diabetic population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus