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Clinical Outcomes of Eyes with Submacular Hemorrhage Secondary to Age-related Macular Degeneration Treated with Anti-vascular Endothelial Growth Factor.

Kim KH, Kim JH, Chang YS, Lee TG, Kim JW, Lew YJ - Korean J Ophthalmol (2015)

Bottom Line: Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) measurements obtained at diagnosis, six months, and the final visit were compared.Both baseline BCVA (p = 0.012) and BCVA at six months (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with BCVA at the final visit.BCVA at six months is a useful clinical index to predict long-term visual prognosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Kim's Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcomes of intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monotherapy for patients diagnosed with submacular hemorrhage secondary to exudative age-related macular degeneration.

Methods: This retrospective, observational study included 49 patients (49 eyes) who initially presented with submacular hemorrhage associated with exudative age-related macular degeneration and who were followed-up for at least 24 months. Only eyes that were treated with intravitreal anti-VEGF monotherapy were included in the study. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) measurements obtained at diagnosis, six months, and the final visit were compared. The associations of BCVA at the final visit with baseline BCVA, BCVA at six months, symptom duration, hemorrhage extent, and central foveal thickness were also analyzed.

Results: Over the course of follow-up (mean, 32.1 ± 8.5 months), an average of 5.1 ± 2.2 anti-VEGF injections were administered. Recurrent hemorrhage was noted in 13 eyes (26.5%). The mean logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution BCVA at diagnosis, six months, and the final visit were 1.40 ± 0.52, 0.87 ± 0.64, and 1.03 ± 0.83, respectively. Both baseline BCVA (p = 0.012) and BCVA at six months (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with BCVA at the final visit.

Conclusions: Improved visual acuity was maintained for more than two years with intravitreal anti-VEGF monotherapy. BCVA at six months is a useful clinical index to predict long-term visual prognosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A timetable showing the timing of recurrences of fovea-involving submacular hemorrhage according to the follow-up period. Inverted triangles indicate the first recurrence. Asterisks indicate the second recurrence. Fifteen recurrences were noted in 13 eyes. Two eyes experienced two episodes of recurrence.
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Figure 3: A timetable showing the timing of recurrences of fovea-involving submacular hemorrhage according to the follow-up period. Inverted triangles indicate the first recurrence. Asterisks indicate the second recurrence. Fifteen recurrences were noted in 13 eyes. Two eyes experienced two episodes of recurrence.

Mentions: Fifteen recurrences of fovea-involving submacular hemorrhage occurred in 13 eyes (26.5%) during the follow-up period (Fig. 3). Two of these eyes experienced multiple recurrences. On average, hemorrhages reoccurred by 15.0 ± 11.1 months (range, 4 to 42) after diagnosis. Four (30.8%) and six eyes (46.2%) were diagnosed with typical exudative AMD and PCV, respectively. The remaining three eyes (23.1%) were unclassified. The results of comparisons between eyes with and without hemorrhage recurrence are summarized in Table 4. There was no difference in baseline BCVA (p = 0.304), BCVA at the final visit (p = 0.709), diagnosis (p = 0.573), symptom duration (p = 0.361), central foveal thickness (p = 0.970), or hemorrhage extent (p = 0.509) between eyes with or without hemorrhage recurrence.


Clinical Outcomes of Eyes with Submacular Hemorrhage Secondary to Age-related Macular Degeneration Treated with Anti-vascular Endothelial Growth Factor.

Kim KH, Kim JH, Chang YS, Lee TG, Kim JW, Lew YJ - Korean J Ophthalmol (2015)

A timetable showing the timing of recurrences of fovea-involving submacular hemorrhage according to the follow-up period. Inverted triangles indicate the first recurrence. Asterisks indicate the second recurrence. Fifteen recurrences were noted in 13 eyes. Two eyes experienced two episodes of recurrence.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595257&req=5

Figure 3: A timetable showing the timing of recurrences of fovea-involving submacular hemorrhage according to the follow-up period. Inverted triangles indicate the first recurrence. Asterisks indicate the second recurrence. Fifteen recurrences were noted in 13 eyes. Two eyes experienced two episodes of recurrence.
Mentions: Fifteen recurrences of fovea-involving submacular hemorrhage occurred in 13 eyes (26.5%) during the follow-up period (Fig. 3). Two of these eyes experienced multiple recurrences. On average, hemorrhages reoccurred by 15.0 ± 11.1 months (range, 4 to 42) after diagnosis. Four (30.8%) and six eyes (46.2%) were diagnosed with typical exudative AMD and PCV, respectively. The remaining three eyes (23.1%) were unclassified. The results of comparisons between eyes with and without hemorrhage recurrence are summarized in Table 4. There was no difference in baseline BCVA (p = 0.304), BCVA at the final visit (p = 0.709), diagnosis (p = 0.573), symptom duration (p = 0.361), central foveal thickness (p = 0.970), or hemorrhage extent (p = 0.509) between eyes with or without hemorrhage recurrence.

Bottom Line: Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) measurements obtained at diagnosis, six months, and the final visit were compared.Both baseline BCVA (p = 0.012) and BCVA at six months (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with BCVA at the final visit.BCVA at six months is a useful clinical index to predict long-term visual prognosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Kim's Eye Hospital, Konyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the long-term outcomes of intravitreal anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monotherapy for patients diagnosed with submacular hemorrhage secondary to exudative age-related macular degeneration.

Methods: This retrospective, observational study included 49 patients (49 eyes) who initially presented with submacular hemorrhage associated with exudative age-related macular degeneration and who were followed-up for at least 24 months. Only eyes that were treated with intravitreal anti-VEGF monotherapy were included in the study. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) measurements obtained at diagnosis, six months, and the final visit were compared. The associations of BCVA at the final visit with baseline BCVA, BCVA at six months, symptom duration, hemorrhage extent, and central foveal thickness were also analyzed.

Results: Over the course of follow-up (mean, 32.1 ± 8.5 months), an average of 5.1 ± 2.2 anti-VEGF injections were administered. Recurrent hemorrhage was noted in 13 eyes (26.5%). The mean logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution BCVA at diagnosis, six months, and the final visit were 1.40 ± 0.52, 0.87 ± 0.64, and 1.03 ± 0.83, respectively. Both baseline BCVA (p = 0.012) and BCVA at six months (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with BCVA at the final visit.

Conclusions: Improved visual acuity was maintained for more than two years with intravitreal anti-VEGF monotherapy. BCVA at six months is a useful clinical index to predict long-term visual prognosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus