Limits...
Choroidal Blood Flow Change in Eyes with High Myopia.

Yang YS, Koh JW - Korean J Ophthalmol (2015)

Bottom Line: High myopes showed significantly lower OBFa, OBFv, and POBF than the other groups (all p < 0.001).These finding explains the influence of axial length on OBFa, OBFv, and POBF, but not on OBFr.Thus, changes in axial length and the possible influence of these changes on the physical properties of choroidal vessels is the mechanism believed to be responsible for putting high myopes at risk for ocular vascular diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Chosun University School of Medicine, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate choroidal blood flow changes in eyes with high myopia according to the pulsatile components of ocular blood flow analysis.

Methods: A total of 104 subjects (52 males and 52 females) were included in this study. One eye of each participant was randomly selected and assigned to one of four refractive groups, designated as, hyperopes (n = 20; refractive error, ≥+1.00 diopter [D]), emmetropes (n = 28; refractive error, ±0.75 D), lower myopes (n = 33; refractive error, -1.00 to -4.75 D), and high myopes (n = 23; refractive error, ≤-5.00 D). Components of pulse amplitude (OBFa), pulse volume (OBFv), pulse rate (OBFr), and pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) were analyzed using a blood flow analyzer. Intraocular pressure and axial length were measured.

Results: Pulsatile components of OBFa, OBFv, and POBF showed positive correlations with refractive error and showed negative correlations with axial length (r = 0.729, r = 0.772, r = 0.781, respectively, all p < 0.001; r = -0.727, r = -0.762, r = -0.771, respectively, all p < 0.001). The correlations of refractive error and axial length with OBFr were irrelevant (r = -0.157, p = 0.113; r = 0.123, p = 0.213). High myopes showed significantly lower OBFa, OBFv, and POBF than the other groups (all p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Axial length changes in high myopes potentially influence choroidal blood flow, assuming the changes are caused by narrowing of the choroidal vessel diameter and increasing rigidity of the choroidal vessel wall. These finding explains the influence of axial length on OBFa, OBFv, and POBF, but not on OBFr. Thus, changes in axial length and the possible influence of these changes on the physical properties of choroidal vessels is the mechanism believed to be responsible for putting high myopes at risk for ocular vascular diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Refractive error correlations. (A) Positive correlation of refractive error with pulse amplitude (OBFa) (r = 0.729, p < 0.001). (B) Positive correlation of refractive error with pulse volume (OBFv) (r = 0.772, p < 0.001). (C) No significant correlation of refractive error with pulse rate (OBFr) (r = -0.157, p = 0.113). (D) Positive correlation of refractive error with pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) (r = 0.781, p < 0.001). D = diopters.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595256&req=5

Figure 3: Refractive error correlations. (A) Positive correlation of refractive error with pulse amplitude (OBFa) (r = 0.729, p < 0.001). (B) Positive correlation of refractive error with pulse volume (OBFv) (r = 0.772, p < 0.001). (C) No significant correlation of refractive error with pulse rate (OBFr) (r = -0.157, p = 0.113). (D) Positive correlation of refractive error with pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) (r = 0.781, p < 0.001). D = diopters.

Mentions: Refractive error showed positive correlations with the pulsatile factors of OBFa, OBFv, and POBF (r = 0.729, p < 0.001; r = 0.772, p < 0.001; r = 0.781, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas axial length showed negative correlations with OBFa, OBFv, and POBF (r = -0.727, p < 0.001; r = -0.762, p < 0.001; r = -0.771, p < 0.001, respectively). The correlations of refractive error and axial length with OBFr were irrelevant (r = -0.157, p = 0.113; r = 0.123, p = 0.213) (Figs. 3 and 4).


Choroidal Blood Flow Change in Eyes with High Myopia.

Yang YS, Koh JW - Korean J Ophthalmol (2015)

Refractive error correlations. (A) Positive correlation of refractive error with pulse amplitude (OBFa) (r = 0.729, p < 0.001). (B) Positive correlation of refractive error with pulse volume (OBFv) (r = 0.772, p < 0.001). (C) No significant correlation of refractive error with pulse rate (OBFr) (r = -0.157, p = 0.113). (D) Positive correlation of refractive error with pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) (r = 0.781, p < 0.001). D = diopters.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595256&req=5

Figure 3: Refractive error correlations. (A) Positive correlation of refractive error with pulse amplitude (OBFa) (r = 0.729, p < 0.001). (B) Positive correlation of refractive error with pulse volume (OBFv) (r = 0.772, p < 0.001). (C) No significant correlation of refractive error with pulse rate (OBFr) (r = -0.157, p = 0.113). (D) Positive correlation of refractive error with pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) (r = 0.781, p < 0.001). D = diopters.
Mentions: Refractive error showed positive correlations with the pulsatile factors of OBFa, OBFv, and POBF (r = 0.729, p < 0.001; r = 0.772, p < 0.001; r = 0.781, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas axial length showed negative correlations with OBFa, OBFv, and POBF (r = -0.727, p < 0.001; r = -0.762, p < 0.001; r = -0.771, p < 0.001, respectively). The correlations of refractive error and axial length with OBFr were irrelevant (r = -0.157, p = 0.113; r = 0.123, p = 0.213) (Figs. 3 and 4).

Bottom Line: High myopes showed significantly lower OBFa, OBFv, and POBF than the other groups (all p < 0.001).These finding explains the influence of axial length on OBFa, OBFv, and POBF, but not on OBFr.Thus, changes in axial length and the possible influence of these changes on the physical properties of choroidal vessels is the mechanism believed to be responsible for putting high myopes at risk for ocular vascular diseases.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ophthalmology, Chosun University School of Medicine, Gwangju, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate choroidal blood flow changes in eyes with high myopia according to the pulsatile components of ocular blood flow analysis.

Methods: A total of 104 subjects (52 males and 52 females) were included in this study. One eye of each participant was randomly selected and assigned to one of four refractive groups, designated as, hyperopes (n = 20; refractive error, ≥+1.00 diopter [D]), emmetropes (n = 28; refractive error, ±0.75 D), lower myopes (n = 33; refractive error, -1.00 to -4.75 D), and high myopes (n = 23; refractive error, ≤-5.00 D). Components of pulse amplitude (OBFa), pulse volume (OBFv), pulse rate (OBFr), and pulsatile ocular blood flow (POBF) were analyzed using a blood flow analyzer. Intraocular pressure and axial length were measured.

Results: Pulsatile components of OBFa, OBFv, and POBF showed positive correlations with refractive error and showed negative correlations with axial length (r = 0.729, r = 0.772, r = 0.781, respectively, all p < 0.001; r = -0.727, r = -0.762, r = -0.771, respectively, all p < 0.001). The correlations of refractive error and axial length with OBFr were irrelevant (r = -0.157, p = 0.113; r = 0.123, p = 0.213). High myopes showed significantly lower OBFa, OBFv, and POBF than the other groups (all p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Axial length changes in high myopes potentially influence choroidal blood flow, assuming the changes are caused by narrowing of the choroidal vessel diameter and increasing rigidity of the choroidal vessel wall. These finding explains the influence of axial length on OBFa, OBFv, and POBF, but not on OBFr. Thus, changes in axial length and the possible influence of these changes on the physical properties of choroidal vessels is the mechanism believed to be responsible for putting high myopes at risk for ocular vascular diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus