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Peritoneal inflammation - A microenvironment for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC).

Freedman RS, Deavers M, Liu J, Wang E - J Transl Med (2004)

Bottom Line: Preferential involvement of peritoneal structures contributes to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients.These alterations may involve a number of proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, either membrane or non-membrane bound, and integrins.These alterations need to be examined and defined as possible prosnosticators and as therapeutic or diagnostic targets.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gynecologic Oncology, The University of Texas M,D, Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. rfreedma@mdanderson.org

ABSTRACT
Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a significant cause of cancer related morbidity and mortality in women. Preferential involvement of peritoneal structures contributes to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients. Advances in biotechnology, such as cDNA microarray, are a product of the Human Genome Project and are beginning to provide fresh opportunities to understand the biology of EOC. In particular, it is now possible to examine in depth, at the molecular level, the complex relationship between the tumor itself and its surrounding microenvironment.This review focuses on the anatomy, physiology, and current immunobiologic research of peritoneal structures, and addresses certain potentially useful animal models. Changes in both the inflammatory and non-inflammatory cell compartments, as well as alterations to the extracellular matrix, appear to be signal events that contribute to the remodeling effects of the peritoneal stroma and surface epithelial cells on tumor growth and spread. These alterations may involve a number of proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, either membrane or non-membrane bound, and integrins. Interactions between these molecules and molecular structures within the extracellular matrix, such as collagens and the proteoglycans, may contribute to a peritoneal mesothelial surface and stromal environment that is conducive to tumor cell proliferation and invasion. These alterations need to be examined and defined as possible prosnosticators and as therapeutic or diagnostic targets.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Surgical restaging by laparoscopy (peritonoscopy) and histopathologic findings showing different patterns of peritoneal involvement following prior systemic chemotherapy. (A,B) Exophytic peritoneal metastases approximately 1 cm in diameter showing multiple capillary loops. Histologic evaluation demonstrates numerous blood vessels surrounded by tumor cells. (C,D) Small 1 mm sized peritoneal metastases that are subperitoneal on histologic evaluation. (E,F) Multiple metastases about 1 cm in diameter that are growing deep to the peritoneal surface and coalescing to form plaques. Histologic evaluation demonstrates that these lesions are relatively avascular and contain significant amounts of peritumoral fibrosis. (Reprinted with permission from Cytokine, Cellular & Molecular Therapy).
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Figure 1: Surgical restaging by laparoscopy (peritonoscopy) and histopathologic findings showing different patterns of peritoneal involvement following prior systemic chemotherapy. (A,B) Exophytic peritoneal metastases approximately 1 cm in diameter showing multiple capillary loops. Histologic evaluation demonstrates numerous blood vessels surrounded by tumor cells. (C,D) Small 1 mm sized peritoneal metastases that are subperitoneal on histologic evaluation. (E,F) Multiple metastases about 1 cm in diameter that are growing deep to the peritoneal surface and coalescing to form plaques. Histologic evaluation demonstrates that these lesions are relatively avascular and contain significant amounts of peritumoral fibrosis. (Reprinted with permission from Cytokine, Cellular & Molecular Therapy).

Mentions: About 80% of the more common epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC) involve the peritoneum or serosal surfaces as microscopic foci and visible lesions. The metastases may be exophytic with direct exposure to the peritoneal cavity and its contents or subperitoneal foci coalescing over time to form variably sized plaque-like deposits (Figure 1). Involvement of the peritoneum predicates an adverse situation for the patient that impacts significantly on prognosis as evidenced by the fact that Stage I patients have a 5 and 10 year survival of 90% [1], whereas patients with Stages III and IV disease have a 5 year survival of about 20%. Though most patients presenting with advanced disease show an initial response to chemotherapy, their fates are ultimately dependent upon sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy agents or other factors. The important contributions of the tumor microenvironment to the malignant phenotype has been demonstrated in recent preclinical tumor models [2-4]. Findings from a recent study of human EOC tumors also suggest the possibility of genomic instability in nontumor tissues adjacent to growing tumor foci in EOC patients [5]. The current review summarizes the structural and functional components of the peritoneum, which could facilitate tumor progression and metastasis.


Peritoneal inflammation - A microenvironment for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC).

Freedman RS, Deavers M, Liu J, Wang E - J Transl Med (2004)

Surgical restaging by laparoscopy (peritonoscopy) and histopathologic findings showing different patterns of peritoneal involvement following prior systemic chemotherapy. (A,B) Exophytic peritoneal metastases approximately 1 cm in diameter showing multiple capillary loops. Histologic evaluation demonstrates numerous blood vessels surrounded by tumor cells. (C,D) Small 1 mm sized peritoneal metastases that are subperitoneal on histologic evaluation. (E,F) Multiple metastases about 1 cm in diameter that are growing deep to the peritoneal surface and coalescing to form plaques. Histologic evaluation demonstrates that these lesions are relatively avascular and contain significant amounts of peritumoral fibrosis. (Reprinted with permission from Cytokine, Cellular & Molecular Therapy).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC459521&req=5

Figure 1: Surgical restaging by laparoscopy (peritonoscopy) and histopathologic findings showing different patterns of peritoneal involvement following prior systemic chemotherapy. (A,B) Exophytic peritoneal metastases approximately 1 cm in diameter showing multiple capillary loops. Histologic evaluation demonstrates numerous blood vessels surrounded by tumor cells. (C,D) Small 1 mm sized peritoneal metastases that are subperitoneal on histologic evaluation. (E,F) Multiple metastases about 1 cm in diameter that are growing deep to the peritoneal surface and coalescing to form plaques. Histologic evaluation demonstrates that these lesions are relatively avascular and contain significant amounts of peritumoral fibrosis. (Reprinted with permission from Cytokine, Cellular & Molecular Therapy).
Mentions: About 80% of the more common epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC) involve the peritoneum or serosal surfaces as microscopic foci and visible lesions. The metastases may be exophytic with direct exposure to the peritoneal cavity and its contents or subperitoneal foci coalescing over time to form variably sized plaque-like deposits (Figure 1). Involvement of the peritoneum predicates an adverse situation for the patient that impacts significantly on prognosis as evidenced by the fact that Stage I patients have a 5 and 10 year survival of 90% [1], whereas patients with Stages III and IV disease have a 5 year survival of about 20%. Though most patients presenting with advanced disease show an initial response to chemotherapy, their fates are ultimately dependent upon sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy agents or other factors. The important contributions of the tumor microenvironment to the malignant phenotype has been demonstrated in recent preclinical tumor models [2-4]. Findings from a recent study of human EOC tumors also suggest the possibility of genomic instability in nontumor tissues adjacent to growing tumor foci in EOC patients [5]. The current review summarizes the structural and functional components of the peritoneum, which could facilitate tumor progression and metastasis.

Bottom Line: Preferential involvement of peritoneal structures contributes to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients.These alterations may involve a number of proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, either membrane or non-membrane bound, and integrins.These alterations need to be examined and defined as possible prosnosticators and as therapeutic or diagnostic targets.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gynecologic Oncology, The University of Texas M,D, Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. rfreedma@mdanderson.org

ABSTRACT
Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a significant cause of cancer related morbidity and mortality in women. Preferential involvement of peritoneal structures contributes to the overall poor outcome in EOC patients. Advances in biotechnology, such as cDNA microarray, are a product of the Human Genome Project and are beginning to provide fresh opportunities to understand the biology of EOC. In particular, it is now possible to examine in depth, at the molecular level, the complex relationship between the tumor itself and its surrounding microenvironment.This review focuses on the anatomy, physiology, and current immunobiologic research of peritoneal structures, and addresses certain potentially useful animal models. Changes in both the inflammatory and non-inflammatory cell compartments, as well as alterations to the extracellular matrix, appear to be signal events that contribute to the remodeling effects of the peritoneal stroma and surface epithelial cells on tumor growth and spread. These alterations may involve a number of proteins, including cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, either membrane or non-membrane bound, and integrins. Interactions between these molecules and molecular structures within the extracellular matrix, such as collagens and the proteoglycans, may contribute to a peritoneal mesothelial surface and stromal environment that is conducive to tumor cell proliferation and invasion. These alterations need to be examined and defined as possible prosnosticators and as therapeutic or diagnostic targets.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus