Limits...
New Insights into Polychaete Traces and Fecal Pellets: Another Complex Ichnotaxon?

Kulkarni KG, Panchang R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The study for the first time reports extensive fecal pellet production, distribution and their preservation as thick stacks in modern estuarine environment.Their occurrence as strings associated with mounds not only suggests pascichnial behaviour of polychaetes but also allows the assignment of post-Paleozoic Tomaculum to the activity of polychaete worms.The production of fecal pellets in such large quantities plays a major role in increasing the average grain size of the substrate of these estuarine tidal flats, thereby improving aeration within the substrate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biodiversity and Palaeobiology Group, Agharkar Research Institute (MACS-ARI), Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Neoichnological observations help refine paleoichnological records. The present study reports extensive observations on the distribution, morphology, occurrence and association of burrows and fecal pellets of the polychaete Nereis diversicolor in the Kundalika Estuary on the west coast of India. Our holistic study of these modern-day traces suggests it to be a complex trace arising from domichnial, fodinichnial and possibly pascichnial behavior of polychaetes. The study for the first time reports extensive fecal pellet production, distribution and their preservation as thick stacks in modern estuarine environment. These observations testify the fossilization potential of pellets and provide an explanation to their origin in the geological record. Their occurrence as strings associated with mounds not only suggests pascichnial behaviour of polychaetes but also allows the assignment of post-Paleozoic Tomaculum to the activity of polychaete worms. The production of fecal pellets in such large quantities plays a major role in increasing the average grain size of the substrate of these estuarine tidal flats, thereby improving aeration within the substrate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of the study area; A. Location of the Kundalika estuary along the west coast of India. The regions shaded in grey denote the tidal flats. Polychaete traces were studied at Revdanda, Chordhe and Lakshmikhar B. Field photograph of the tidal flat at Revdanda.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595207&req=5

pone.0139933.g001: Map of the study area; A. Location of the Kundalika estuary along the west coast of India. The regions shaded in grey denote the tidal flats. Polychaete traces were studied at Revdanda, Chordhe and Lakshmikhar B. Field photograph of the tidal flat at Revdanda.

Mentions: Polychaete burrows associated with mounds of pellets are the most common traces visible on the vast tidal flats of the Kundalika Estuary. The Kundalika is a major river meeting the Arabian Sea at Revdanda in the Central West Coast of India (Fig 1A), which originates at an altitude of 820 m above sea level about 150 km southeast of Mumbai. It flows in a southeast–northwest direction, has a funnel shaped mouth and the estuary is dominated by semi-diurnal tides. Of the total 40 km length of the estuary, the lower 27 km are the tidal stretch. The width of the channel increases considerably from the upper (150 m) to the lower reaches (600 to 700 m). Upstream the estuary is a drowned valley that opens up into a wide channel with expansive tidal flats in its middle reaches. The tidal flats in the upper estuary (50 to 150 m wide) are characterized by marshlands, whereas those in the middle and lower estuary (100 to 900 m wide) support dense mangrove vegetation (Fig 1B). The study area experiences tropical warm, humid climate throughout the year. The temperature ranges between 25°C and 35°C and the average annual rainfall is 3750 mm.


New Insights into Polychaete Traces and Fecal Pellets: Another Complex Ichnotaxon?

Kulkarni KG, Panchang R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Map of the study area; A. Location of the Kundalika estuary along the west coast of India. The regions shaded in grey denote the tidal flats. Polychaete traces were studied at Revdanda, Chordhe and Lakshmikhar B. Field photograph of the tidal flat at Revdanda.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4595207&req=5

pone.0139933.g001: Map of the study area; A. Location of the Kundalika estuary along the west coast of India. The regions shaded in grey denote the tidal flats. Polychaete traces were studied at Revdanda, Chordhe and Lakshmikhar B. Field photograph of the tidal flat at Revdanda.
Mentions: Polychaete burrows associated with mounds of pellets are the most common traces visible on the vast tidal flats of the Kundalika Estuary. The Kundalika is a major river meeting the Arabian Sea at Revdanda in the Central West Coast of India (Fig 1A), which originates at an altitude of 820 m above sea level about 150 km southeast of Mumbai. It flows in a southeast–northwest direction, has a funnel shaped mouth and the estuary is dominated by semi-diurnal tides. Of the total 40 km length of the estuary, the lower 27 km are the tidal stretch. The width of the channel increases considerably from the upper (150 m) to the lower reaches (600 to 700 m). Upstream the estuary is a drowned valley that opens up into a wide channel with expansive tidal flats in its middle reaches. The tidal flats in the upper estuary (50 to 150 m wide) are characterized by marshlands, whereas those in the middle and lower estuary (100 to 900 m wide) support dense mangrove vegetation (Fig 1B). The study area experiences tropical warm, humid climate throughout the year. The temperature ranges between 25°C and 35°C and the average annual rainfall is 3750 mm.

Bottom Line: The study for the first time reports extensive fecal pellet production, distribution and their preservation as thick stacks in modern estuarine environment.Their occurrence as strings associated with mounds not only suggests pascichnial behaviour of polychaetes but also allows the assignment of post-Paleozoic Tomaculum to the activity of polychaete worms.The production of fecal pellets in such large quantities plays a major role in increasing the average grain size of the substrate of these estuarine tidal flats, thereby improving aeration within the substrate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biodiversity and Palaeobiology Group, Agharkar Research Institute (MACS-ARI), Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Neoichnological observations help refine paleoichnological records. The present study reports extensive observations on the distribution, morphology, occurrence and association of burrows and fecal pellets of the polychaete Nereis diversicolor in the Kundalika Estuary on the west coast of India. Our holistic study of these modern-day traces suggests it to be a complex trace arising from domichnial, fodinichnial and possibly pascichnial behavior of polychaetes. The study for the first time reports extensive fecal pellet production, distribution and their preservation as thick stacks in modern estuarine environment. These observations testify the fossilization potential of pellets and provide an explanation to their origin in the geological record. Their occurrence as strings associated with mounds not only suggests pascichnial behaviour of polychaetes but also allows the assignment of post-Paleozoic Tomaculum to the activity of polychaete worms. The production of fecal pellets in such large quantities plays a major role in increasing the average grain size of the substrate of these estuarine tidal flats, thereby improving aeration within the substrate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus