Limits...
Effects of Breaking Sitting by Standing and Acute Exercise on Postprandial Oxidative Stress.

Takahashi M, Miyashita M, Park JH, Sakamoto S, Suzuki K - Asian J Sports Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Breaking sedentary behavior improves metabolic health such as postprandial glycaemia and insulinemia.However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are unclear.Here, we examined whether breaking sitting by standing and acute exercise reduces postprandial oxidative stress.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokorozawa, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Sedentary behavior, which includes sitting and TV viewing, has been identified as an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Breaking sedentary behavior improves metabolic health such as postprandial glycaemia and insulinemia. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are unclear.

Objectives: Here, we examined whether breaking sitting by standing and acute exercise reduces postprandial oxidative stress.

Patient and methods: Fifteen participants performed 3 trials (sitting, standing, and exercise), each lasting 2 days, in a randomised order. On day one of sitting trial, participants sat in a chair. For the standing trial, the participants stood 6 times, for a 45-minute period each time. For the exercise trial, the participants walked or ran at approximately 60% of age-predicted maximum heart rate for 30 minutes. On day two of each trial, participants rested and consumed the standardised breakfast and lunch. Blood samples were collected in the morning and afternoon on day one, and fasting and at 2, 4, and 6 hours postprandially on day two.

Results: The concentrations of serum derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) measured at 4 hours (P = 0.064) and 6 hours (P = 0.071) tended to be higher than that in the fasting state in the sitting trial, but not standing and exercise trial (two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), trial × time interaction, P = 0.006).

Conclusions: Our results indicate the importance of reducing sitting time for improving postprandial oxidative stress status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fasting and Postprandial Concentrations of Serum Derivatives of Reactive Oxygen Metabolites (d-ROMs)(A), plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) (B), activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) (C), and concentrations of plasma thioredoxin (TRX) (D) measured on days one and two during the sitting, standing, and exercise trials (n = 15). Data were presented as means ± standard error (SE). M, morning on day one; A, afternoon on day one. The black rectangles indicate the times when the test meals were consumed. Data were analysed using two-factor ANOVA. The main effect of trials (d-ROMs, P = 0.352; TBARS, P = 0.850; GPX, P = 0.228; TRX, P = 0.904), time (d-ROMs, P = 0.116; TBARS, P = 0.001; GPX, P = 0.083; TRX, P = 0.738), and trials × time interaction (d-ROMs, P = 0.006; TBARS, P = 0.093; GPX, P = 0.017; TRX, P = 0.049).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4594144&req=5

fig22118: Fasting and Postprandial Concentrations of Serum Derivatives of Reactive Oxygen Metabolites (d-ROMs)(A), plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) (B), activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) (C), and concentrations of plasma thioredoxin (TRX) (D) measured on days one and two during the sitting, standing, and exercise trials (n = 15). Data were presented as means ± standard error (SE). M, morning on day one; A, afternoon on day one. The black rectangles indicate the times when the test meals were consumed. Data were analysed using two-factor ANOVA. The main effect of trials (d-ROMs, P = 0.352; TBARS, P = 0.850; GPX, P = 0.228; TRX, P = 0.904), time (d-ROMs, P = 0.116; TBARS, P = 0.001; GPX, P = 0.083; TRX, P = 0.738), and trials × time interaction (d-ROMs, P = 0.006; TBARS, P = 0.093; GPX, P = 0.017; TRX, P = 0.049).

Mentions: For serum d-ROMs concentrations, two-factor ANOVA revealed a significant trial × time interaction (P = 0.006) (Figure 1). Post-hoc tests showed that serum d-ROMs concentrations at 4 hours (P = 0.064) and 6 hours (P = 0.071) were higher than those in the fasting state (0 hour) in the sitting trial. For plasma TBARS concentrations, two-factor ANOVA revealed that there was a main effect of time (P = 0.001) (Figure 1).


Effects of Breaking Sitting by Standing and Acute Exercise on Postprandial Oxidative Stress.

Takahashi M, Miyashita M, Park JH, Sakamoto S, Suzuki K - Asian J Sports Med (2015)

Fasting and Postprandial Concentrations of Serum Derivatives of Reactive Oxygen Metabolites (d-ROMs)(A), plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) (B), activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) (C), and concentrations of plasma thioredoxin (TRX) (D) measured on days one and two during the sitting, standing, and exercise trials (n = 15). Data were presented as means ± standard error (SE). M, morning on day one; A, afternoon on day one. The black rectangles indicate the times when the test meals were consumed. Data were analysed using two-factor ANOVA. The main effect of trials (d-ROMs, P = 0.352; TBARS, P = 0.850; GPX, P = 0.228; TRX, P = 0.904), time (d-ROMs, P = 0.116; TBARS, P = 0.001; GPX, P = 0.083; TRX, P = 0.738), and trials × time interaction (d-ROMs, P = 0.006; TBARS, P = 0.093; GPX, P = 0.017; TRX, P = 0.049).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4594144&req=5

fig22118: Fasting and Postprandial Concentrations of Serum Derivatives of Reactive Oxygen Metabolites (d-ROMs)(A), plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) (B), activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) (C), and concentrations of plasma thioredoxin (TRX) (D) measured on days one and two during the sitting, standing, and exercise trials (n = 15). Data were presented as means ± standard error (SE). M, morning on day one; A, afternoon on day one. The black rectangles indicate the times when the test meals were consumed. Data were analysed using two-factor ANOVA. The main effect of trials (d-ROMs, P = 0.352; TBARS, P = 0.850; GPX, P = 0.228; TRX, P = 0.904), time (d-ROMs, P = 0.116; TBARS, P = 0.001; GPX, P = 0.083; TRX, P = 0.738), and trials × time interaction (d-ROMs, P = 0.006; TBARS, P = 0.093; GPX, P = 0.017; TRX, P = 0.049).
Mentions: For serum d-ROMs concentrations, two-factor ANOVA revealed a significant trial × time interaction (P = 0.006) (Figure 1). Post-hoc tests showed that serum d-ROMs concentrations at 4 hours (P = 0.064) and 6 hours (P = 0.071) were higher than those in the fasting state (0 hour) in the sitting trial. For plasma TBARS concentrations, two-factor ANOVA revealed that there was a main effect of time (P = 0.001) (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Breaking sedentary behavior improves metabolic health such as postprandial glycaemia and insulinemia.However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are unclear.Here, we examined whether breaking sitting by standing and acute exercise reduces postprandial oxidative stress.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokorozawa, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: Sedentary behavior, which includes sitting and TV viewing, has been identified as an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Breaking sedentary behavior improves metabolic health such as postprandial glycaemia and insulinemia. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect are unclear.

Objectives: Here, we examined whether breaking sitting by standing and acute exercise reduces postprandial oxidative stress.

Patient and methods: Fifteen participants performed 3 trials (sitting, standing, and exercise), each lasting 2 days, in a randomised order. On day one of sitting trial, participants sat in a chair. For the standing trial, the participants stood 6 times, for a 45-minute period each time. For the exercise trial, the participants walked or ran at approximately 60% of age-predicted maximum heart rate for 30 minutes. On day two of each trial, participants rested and consumed the standardised breakfast and lunch. Blood samples were collected in the morning and afternoon on day one, and fasting and at 2, 4, and 6 hours postprandially on day two.

Results: The concentrations of serum derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) measured at 4 hours (P = 0.064) and 6 hours (P = 0.071) tended to be higher than that in the fasting state in the sitting trial, but not standing and exercise trial (two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), trial × time interaction, P = 0.006).

Conclusions: Our results indicate the importance of reducing sitting time for improving postprandial oxidative stress status.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus