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Criterion Related Validity of Karate Specific Aerobic Test (KSAT).

Chaabene H, Hachana Y, Franchini E, Tabben M, Mkaouer B, Negra Y, Hammami M, Chamari K - Asian J Sports Med (2015)

Bottom Line: On the other hand, there was a significant relationship between KSAT's TE and the velocity associated with VO2max (vVO2max) (r = 0.67; P = 0.03; [large]) as well as the velocity at VO2 corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold (vVO2 VAT) (r = 0.64; P = 0.04; [large]).Moreover, significant relationship was found between TE's KSAT and both the total distance covered and parameters of intermittent endurance measured through YoYoIRTL1.The establishment of the criterion related validity of the KSAT requires further investigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tunisian Research Laboratory (Sport Performance Optimization), National Center of Medicine and Science in Sport, Tunis, Tunisia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Karate is one the most popular combat sports in the world. Physical fitness assessment on a regular manner is important for monitoring the effectiveness of the training program and the readiness of karatekas to compete.

Objectives: The aim of this research was to examine the criterion related to validity of the karate specific aerobic test (KSAT) as an indicator of aerobic level of karate practitioners.

Patients and methods: Cardiorespiratory responses, aerobic performance level through both treadmill laboratory test and YoYo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YoYoIRTL1) as well as time to exhaustion in the KSAT test (TE'KSAT) were determined in a total of fifteen healthy international karatekas (i.e. karate practitioners) (means ± SD: age: 22.2 ± 4.3 years; height: 176.4 ± 7.5 cm; body mass: 70.3 ± 9.7 kg and body fat: 13.2 ± 6%).

Results: Peak heart rate obtained from KSAT represented ~99% of maximal heart rate registered during the treadmill test showing that KSAT imposes high physiological demands. There was no significant correlation between KSAT's TE and relative (mL/min kg) treadmill maximal oxygen uptake (r = 0.14; P = 0.69; [small]). On the other hand, there was a significant relationship between KSAT's TE and the velocity associated with VO2max (vVO2max) (r = 0.67; P = 0.03; [large]) as well as the velocity at VO2 corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold (vVO2 VAT) (r = 0.64; P = 0.04; [large]). Moreover, significant relationship was found between TE's KSAT and both the total distance covered and parameters of intermittent endurance measured through YoYoIRTL1.

Conclusions: The KSAT has not proved to have indirect criterion related validity as no significant correlations have been found between TE's KSAT and treadmill VO2max. Nevertheless, as correlated to other aerobic fitness variables, KSAT can be considered as an indicator of karate specific endurance. The establishment of the criterion related validity of the KSAT requires further investigation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Techniques Used During the Karate Specific Aerobic Test (KSAT)A, kizami-tsuki (straight punch); B, mawashi-geri (rear leg roundhousekick); C, kyaku-zuki (rear straight punch); and D, kiza-mawashi-geri (leadingroundhouse kick).
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fig22145: Techniques Used During the Karate Specific Aerobic Test (KSAT)A, kizami-tsuki (straight punch); B, mawashi-geri (rear leg roundhousekick); C, kyaku-zuki (rear straight punch); and D, kiza-mawashi-geri (leadingroundhouse kick).

Mentions: The test protocol consisted of sequential sets of straight punch and roundhouse kick combinations on a heavy punch/kick bag suspended from a wall mounted bracket. The combination included a leading straight punch (Figure 1 A) followed by a rear leg roundhouse kick (Figure 1 B), a rear straight punch (Figure 1 C) and a leading roundhouse kick (Figure 1 D), repeated twice (10). The time to complete this set of movement accurately and without haste was set at 7 seconds. This allowed sufficient time to execute and prepare each strike in controlled and proper manner. The progression in intensity of the exercise during the test was based on a similar sequence of emitted audio beeps as the multistage fitness test (17). The test was designed with two auditory signals, the first to let the participants know when to begin the bout of exercise and the second sound to indicate when they should rest (7 seconds later). The time to complete the exercise bout remained the same, 7 seconds, whilst the recovery time between bouts progressively decreased. Participants had to perform each punch and kick with maximum power. The aim here was to maintain maximal exercise intensity whilst progressively making the test more demanding by reducing the recovery between exercise bouts (10). When the participant failed to complete the set of movements in the 7 seconds interval twice or when there was clear decrease in the power of techniques according to the recommendations provided in the original article from Nunan (10), the time to exhaustion was recorded and represented the final test result. It has been recently shown that KSAT presents very good relative and absolute reliability (ICC > 0.90 and SEM < 5%, respectively) as well as a good discriminative ability to differentiate between national and regional level karate practitioners (8, 18).


Criterion Related Validity of Karate Specific Aerobic Test (KSAT).

Chaabene H, Hachana Y, Franchini E, Tabben M, Mkaouer B, Negra Y, Hammami M, Chamari K - Asian J Sports Med (2015)

Techniques Used During the Karate Specific Aerobic Test (KSAT)A, kizami-tsuki (straight punch); B, mawashi-geri (rear leg roundhousekick); C, kyaku-zuki (rear straight punch); and D, kiza-mawashi-geri (leadingroundhouse kick).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4594135&req=5

fig22145: Techniques Used During the Karate Specific Aerobic Test (KSAT)A, kizami-tsuki (straight punch); B, mawashi-geri (rear leg roundhousekick); C, kyaku-zuki (rear straight punch); and D, kiza-mawashi-geri (leadingroundhouse kick).
Mentions: The test protocol consisted of sequential sets of straight punch and roundhouse kick combinations on a heavy punch/kick bag suspended from a wall mounted bracket. The combination included a leading straight punch (Figure 1 A) followed by a rear leg roundhouse kick (Figure 1 B), a rear straight punch (Figure 1 C) and a leading roundhouse kick (Figure 1 D), repeated twice (10). The time to complete this set of movement accurately and without haste was set at 7 seconds. This allowed sufficient time to execute and prepare each strike in controlled and proper manner. The progression in intensity of the exercise during the test was based on a similar sequence of emitted audio beeps as the multistage fitness test (17). The test was designed with two auditory signals, the first to let the participants know when to begin the bout of exercise and the second sound to indicate when they should rest (7 seconds later). The time to complete the exercise bout remained the same, 7 seconds, whilst the recovery time between bouts progressively decreased. Participants had to perform each punch and kick with maximum power. The aim here was to maintain maximal exercise intensity whilst progressively making the test more demanding by reducing the recovery between exercise bouts (10). When the participant failed to complete the set of movements in the 7 seconds interval twice or when there was clear decrease in the power of techniques according to the recommendations provided in the original article from Nunan (10), the time to exhaustion was recorded and represented the final test result. It has been recently shown that KSAT presents very good relative and absolute reliability (ICC > 0.90 and SEM < 5%, respectively) as well as a good discriminative ability to differentiate between national and regional level karate practitioners (8, 18).

Bottom Line: On the other hand, there was a significant relationship between KSAT's TE and the velocity associated with VO2max (vVO2max) (r = 0.67; P = 0.03; [large]) as well as the velocity at VO2 corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold (vVO2 VAT) (r = 0.64; P = 0.04; [large]).Moreover, significant relationship was found between TE's KSAT and both the total distance covered and parameters of intermittent endurance measured through YoYoIRTL1.The establishment of the criterion related validity of the KSAT requires further investigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tunisian Research Laboratory (Sport Performance Optimization), National Center of Medicine and Science in Sport, Tunis, Tunisia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Karate is one the most popular combat sports in the world. Physical fitness assessment on a regular manner is important for monitoring the effectiveness of the training program and the readiness of karatekas to compete.

Objectives: The aim of this research was to examine the criterion related to validity of the karate specific aerobic test (KSAT) as an indicator of aerobic level of karate practitioners.

Patients and methods: Cardiorespiratory responses, aerobic performance level through both treadmill laboratory test and YoYo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YoYoIRTL1) as well as time to exhaustion in the KSAT test (TE'KSAT) were determined in a total of fifteen healthy international karatekas (i.e. karate practitioners) (means ± SD: age: 22.2 ± 4.3 years; height: 176.4 ± 7.5 cm; body mass: 70.3 ± 9.7 kg and body fat: 13.2 ± 6%).

Results: Peak heart rate obtained from KSAT represented ~99% of maximal heart rate registered during the treadmill test showing that KSAT imposes high physiological demands. There was no significant correlation between KSAT's TE and relative (mL/min kg) treadmill maximal oxygen uptake (r = 0.14; P = 0.69; [small]). On the other hand, there was a significant relationship between KSAT's TE and the velocity associated with VO2max (vVO2max) (r = 0.67; P = 0.03; [large]) as well as the velocity at VO2 corresponding to the second ventilatory threshold (vVO2 VAT) (r = 0.64; P = 0.04; [large]). Moreover, significant relationship was found between TE's KSAT and both the total distance covered and parameters of intermittent endurance measured through YoYoIRTL1.

Conclusions: The KSAT has not proved to have indirect criterion related validity as no significant correlations have been found between TE's KSAT and treadmill VO2max. Nevertheless, as correlated to other aerobic fitness variables, KSAT can be considered as an indicator of karate specific endurance. The establishment of the criterion related validity of the KSAT requires further investigation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus