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Obturator Internus and Obturator Externus Strain in a High School Quarterback.

Khodaee M, Jones D, Spittler J - Asian J Sports Med (2015)

Bottom Line: The authors present a previously unreported case of acute obturator internus and obturator externus strain in an adolescent male American football player.The diagnosis was made by MRI.Despite rarity of the hip external rotator muscles strains, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of athletes with proximal posterior thigh and buttock pain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Buttock pain is a relatively common complaint among adolescent athletes and can have a very broad differential diagnosis.

Case presentation: The authors present a previously unreported case of acute obturator internus and obturator externus strain in an adolescent male American football player. The diagnosis was made by MRI. The patient was treated with relative rest, physical therapy, and gradual return to physical activities as tolerated.

Conclusions: Despite rarity of the hip external rotator muscles strains, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of athletes with proximal posterior thigh and buttock pain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Unremarkable Anteroposterior Pelvis (A) and Frogleg Lateral Radiographs of the Right Hip (B)
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fig21695: Unremarkable Anteroposterior Pelvis (A) and Frogleg Lateral Radiographs of the Right Hip (B)

Mentions: Plain radiography in the office was normal (Figure 1). MRI (including post-gadolinium images) was performed to evaluate bony, chondral, or labral abnormality on day three post-injury. MRI revealed high grade right obturator internus and obturator externus muscle strain involving the attachments to the obturator ring and ischium (Figure 2). Otherwise, MRI was unremarkable with no signs of joint effusion, chondral, or labral pathologies. The patient was advised to do relative rest for a few days and use acetaminophen as needed for pain. Then he began gentle hip range of motion exercises and partial weight bearing as tolerated for two weeks. He started physical therapy consisting of joint/soft tissue mobilization, aquatic therapy, electrical stimulation, ultrasound, iontophoresis, infra-red light therapy, hot/cold modalities, therapeutic exercise, functional movement of the hip, and gait training three weeks post injury. After completing a few weeks of formal physical therapy he transitioned to home exercises as instructed. Patient was symptom free during a follow up visit six weeks after the injury. His physical examination was unremarkable with normal, pain-free hip range of motion. He was cleared to return to full physical activity at that time.


Obturator Internus and Obturator Externus Strain in a High School Quarterback.

Khodaee M, Jones D, Spittler J - Asian J Sports Med (2015)

Unremarkable Anteroposterior Pelvis (A) and Frogleg Lateral Radiographs of the Right Hip (B)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4594131&req=5

fig21695: Unremarkable Anteroposterior Pelvis (A) and Frogleg Lateral Radiographs of the Right Hip (B)
Mentions: Plain radiography in the office was normal (Figure 1). MRI (including post-gadolinium images) was performed to evaluate bony, chondral, or labral abnormality on day three post-injury. MRI revealed high grade right obturator internus and obturator externus muscle strain involving the attachments to the obturator ring and ischium (Figure 2). Otherwise, MRI was unremarkable with no signs of joint effusion, chondral, or labral pathologies. The patient was advised to do relative rest for a few days and use acetaminophen as needed for pain. Then he began gentle hip range of motion exercises and partial weight bearing as tolerated for two weeks. He started physical therapy consisting of joint/soft tissue mobilization, aquatic therapy, electrical stimulation, ultrasound, iontophoresis, infra-red light therapy, hot/cold modalities, therapeutic exercise, functional movement of the hip, and gait training three weeks post injury. After completing a few weeks of formal physical therapy he transitioned to home exercises as instructed. Patient was symptom free during a follow up visit six weeks after the injury. His physical examination was unremarkable with normal, pain-free hip range of motion. He was cleared to return to full physical activity at that time.

Bottom Line: The authors present a previously unreported case of acute obturator internus and obturator externus strain in an adolescent male American football player.The diagnosis was made by MRI.Despite rarity of the hip external rotator muscles strains, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of athletes with proximal posterior thigh and buttock pain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Buttock pain is a relatively common complaint among adolescent athletes and can have a very broad differential diagnosis.

Case presentation: The authors present a previously unreported case of acute obturator internus and obturator externus strain in an adolescent male American football player. The diagnosis was made by MRI. The patient was treated with relative rest, physical therapy, and gradual return to physical activities as tolerated.

Conclusions: Despite rarity of the hip external rotator muscles strains, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of athletes with proximal posterior thigh and buttock pain.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus