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Aberrant intra- and inter-network connectivity architectures in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

Wang P, Zhou B, Yao H, Zhan Y, Zhang Z, Cui Y, Xu K, Ma J, Wang L, An N, Zhang X, Liu Y, Jiang T - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Based on three levels of analysis, we found that intra- and inter-network connectivity were impaired in AD.Lower cognitive ability (lower MMSE scores) was significantly associated with greater reductions in intra- and inter-network connectivity across all patient groups.These profiles indicate that aberrant intra- and inter-network dysfunctions might be potential biomarkers or predictors of AD progression and provide new insight into AD pathophysiology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Institute of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 100853, China.

ABSTRACT
Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and those with high-risk mild cognitive impairment are increasingly considered to have dysfunction syndromes. Large-scale network studies based on neuroimaging techniques may provide additional insight into AD pathophysiology. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the impaired network functional connectivity with the disease progression. For this purpose, we explored altered functional connectivities based on previously well-defined brain areas that comprise the five key functional systems [the default mode network (DMN), dorsal attention network (DAN), control network (CON), salience network (SAL), sensorimotor network (SMN)] in 35 with AD and 27 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, compared with 27 normal cognitive subjects. Based on three levels of analysis, we found that intra- and inter-network connectivity were impaired in AD. Importantly, the interaction between the sensorimotor and attention functions was first attacked at the MCI stage and then extended to the key functional systems in the AD individuals. Lower cognitive ability (lower MMSE scores) was significantly associated with greater reductions in intra- and inter-network connectivity across all patient groups. These profiles indicate that aberrant intra- and inter-network dysfunctions might be potential biomarkers or predictors of AD progression and provide new insight into AD pathophysiology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Group effects by one-way ANOVA for and the relationship between integrity connectivity and MMSE scores.Bar graphs show the differences in the mean Z scores for the affected regions among the three groups. The changed regions were anchored in the right motor cortex (rMC) (A), the right posterior intraparietal sulcus (rpIPS) (B) and the bilateral primary visual (V1) (C,D). The Z scores for the bilateral V1 and rpIPS were higher in the NC group than in the AD and MCI groups, and the rMC of the NC group was greater than that of the MCI group only. The NC group is indicated by black rectangles, the MCI group by grey rectangles and the AD group by white rectangles. The error bars represent the standard error of each subgroup. The scatter plots show the relationship between the mean Z scores of rpIPS and MMSE scores in the MCI patients (r = −0.418, p = 0.03) (E).
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f1: Group effects by one-way ANOVA for and the relationship between integrity connectivity and MMSE scores.Bar graphs show the differences in the mean Z scores for the affected regions among the three groups. The changed regions were anchored in the right motor cortex (rMC) (A), the right posterior intraparietal sulcus (rpIPS) (B) and the bilateral primary visual (V1) (C,D). The Z scores for the bilateral V1 and rpIPS were higher in the NC group than in the AD and MCI groups, and the rMC of the NC group was greater than that of the MCI group only. The NC group is indicated by black rectangles, the MCI group by grey rectangles and the AD group by white rectangles. The error bars represent the standard error of each subgroup. The scatter plots show the relationship between the mean Z scores of rpIPS and MMSE scores in the MCI patients (r = −0.418, p = 0.03) (E).

Mentions: At the integrity level, significant group differences were anchored in the right motor cortex (rMC), the bilateral primary visual (V1), and the right posterior intraparietal sulcus (rpIPS) (Table 2, Fig. 1). Post hoc analysis showed that the integrity connectivity of these regions was reduced in the AD and MCI groups compared with the NC, but there was no significant alteration between the AD and MCI groups (Fig. 1).


Aberrant intra- and inter-network connectivity architectures in Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.

Wang P, Zhou B, Yao H, Zhan Y, Zhang Z, Cui Y, Xu K, Ma J, Wang L, An N, Zhang X, Liu Y, Jiang T - Sci Rep (2015)

Group effects by one-way ANOVA for and the relationship between integrity connectivity and MMSE scores.Bar graphs show the differences in the mean Z scores for the affected regions among the three groups. The changed regions were anchored in the right motor cortex (rMC) (A), the right posterior intraparietal sulcus (rpIPS) (B) and the bilateral primary visual (V1) (C,D). The Z scores for the bilateral V1 and rpIPS were higher in the NC group than in the AD and MCI groups, and the rMC of the NC group was greater than that of the MCI group only. The NC group is indicated by black rectangles, the MCI group by grey rectangles and the AD group by white rectangles. The error bars represent the standard error of each subgroup. The scatter plots show the relationship between the mean Z scores of rpIPS and MMSE scores in the MCI patients (r = −0.418, p = 0.03) (E).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4594099&req=5

f1: Group effects by one-way ANOVA for and the relationship between integrity connectivity and MMSE scores.Bar graphs show the differences in the mean Z scores for the affected regions among the three groups. The changed regions were anchored in the right motor cortex (rMC) (A), the right posterior intraparietal sulcus (rpIPS) (B) and the bilateral primary visual (V1) (C,D). The Z scores for the bilateral V1 and rpIPS were higher in the NC group than in the AD and MCI groups, and the rMC of the NC group was greater than that of the MCI group only. The NC group is indicated by black rectangles, the MCI group by grey rectangles and the AD group by white rectangles. The error bars represent the standard error of each subgroup. The scatter plots show the relationship between the mean Z scores of rpIPS and MMSE scores in the MCI patients (r = −0.418, p = 0.03) (E).
Mentions: At the integrity level, significant group differences were anchored in the right motor cortex (rMC), the bilateral primary visual (V1), and the right posterior intraparietal sulcus (rpIPS) (Table 2, Fig. 1). Post hoc analysis showed that the integrity connectivity of these regions was reduced in the AD and MCI groups compared with the NC, but there was no significant alteration between the AD and MCI groups (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Based on three levels of analysis, we found that intra- and inter-network connectivity were impaired in AD.Lower cognitive ability (lower MMSE scores) was significantly associated with greater reductions in intra- and inter-network connectivity across all patient groups.These profiles indicate that aberrant intra- and inter-network dysfunctions might be potential biomarkers or predictors of AD progression and provide new insight into AD pathophysiology.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Institute of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, 100853, China.

ABSTRACT
Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and those with high-risk mild cognitive impairment are increasingly considered to have dysfunction syndromes. Large-scale network studies based on neuroimaging techniques may provide additional insight into AD pathophysiology. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the impaired network functional connectivity with the disease progression. For this purpose, we explored altered functional connectivities based on previously well-defined brain areas that comprise the five key functional systems [the default mode network (DMN), dorsal attention network (DAN), control network (CON), salience network (SAL), sensorimotor network (SMN)] in 35 with AD and 27 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, compared with 27 normal cognitive subjects. Based on three levels of analysis, we found that intra- and inter-network connectivity were impaired in AD. Importantly, the interaction between the sensorimotor and attention functions was first attacked at the MCI stage and then extended to the key functional systems in the AD individuals. Lower cognitive ability (lower MMSE scores) was significantly associated with greater reductions in intra- and inter-network connectivity across all patient groups. These profiles indicate that aberrant intra- and inter-network dysfunctions might be potential biomarkers or predictors of AD progression and provide new insight into AD pathophysiology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus