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Controlled mud-crack patterning and self-organized cracking of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer surfaces.

Seghir R, Arscott S - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The density of the mud-crack patterns depends on the plasma dose and on the metal thickness.The mud-crack patterning can be controlled depending on the thickness and shape of the metallization - ultimately leading to regularly spaced cracks and/or metal mesa structures.Such patterning of the cracks indicates a level of self-organization in the structuring and layout of the features - arrived at simply by imposing metallization boundaries in proximity to each other, separated by a distance of the order of the critical dimension of the pattern size apparent in the large surface mud-crack patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut d'Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), CNRS UMR8520, The University of Lille, Cité Scientifique, Avenue Poincaré, 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France.

ABSTRACT
Exploiting pattern formation - such as that observed in nature - in the context of micro/nanotechnology could have great benefits if coupled with the traditional top-down lithographic approach. Here, we demonstrate an original and simple method to produce unique, localized and controllable self-organised patterns on elastomeric films. A thin, brittle silica-like crust is formed on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using oxygen plasma. This crust is subsequently cracked via the deposition of a thin metal film - having residual tensile stress. The density of the mud-crack patterns depends on the plasma dose and on the metal thickness. The mud-crack patterning can be controlled depending on the thickness and shape of the metallization - ultimately leading to regularly spaced cracks and/or metal mesa structures. Such patterning of the cracks indicates a level of self-organization in the structuring and layout of the features - arrived at simply by imposing metallization boundaries in proximity to each other, separated by a distance of the order of the critical dimension of the pattern size apparent in the large surface mud-crack patterns.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of mask aspect ratio on the mud-crack patterning.(a) chromium/gold (5 nm/100nm) – 100 × 500 μm2 rectangle. (b) chromium/gold (5 nm/100nm) – 150 μm × 1000 μm lines. (c,d) chromium/gold (10 nm/100nm) – 100 × 500 μm2 rectangle. (e) chromium lines (150 μm × 1000 μm) following the removal of the 100 nm gold layer and (f) 3D image of cracking of the PDMS surface following removal of the chromium/gold (10 nm/100 nm) layer – 100 μm × 500 μm lines.
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f6: Effect of mask aspect ratio on the mud-crack patterning.(a) chromium/gold (5 nm/100nm) – 100 × 500 μm2 rectangle. (b) chromium/gold (5 nm/100nm) – 150 μm × 1000 μm lines. (c,d) chromium/gold (10 nm/100nm) – 100 × 500 μm2 rectangle. (e) chromium lines (150 μm × 1000 μm) following the removal of the 100 nm gold layer and (f) 3D image of cracking of the PDMS surface following removal of the chromium/gold (10 nm/100 nm) layer – 100 μm × 500 μm lines.

Mentions: Let us now focus on metallized rectangles and lines, i.e. when the mask width is lower than Lc while the mask length is significantly longer. Figure 6 shows the resulting cracking of the metallized PDMS surfaces in the case of metallization of rectangles (100 × 500 μm2) and lines (150 μm by 1 mm). Two different thickness of chromium are used: 5 nm (Fig. 6a,b) and 10 nm (Fig. 6c–f). The gold has been removed (see Methods) in Fig. 6e to reveal the chromium and the chromium/gold has been removed (see Methods) in Fig. 6f to reveal the PDMS topography.


Controlled mud-crack patterning and self-organized cracking of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer surfaces.

Seghir R, Arscott S - Sci Rep (2015)

Effect of mask aspect ratio on the mud-crack patterning.(a) chromium/gold (5 nm/100nm) – 100 × 500 μm2 rectangle. (b) chromium/gold (5 nm/100nm) – 150 μm × 1000 μm lines. (c,d) chromium/gold (10 nm/100nm) – 100 × 500 μm2 rectangle. (e) chromium lines (150 μm × 1000 μm) following the removal of the 100 nm gold layer and (f) 3D image of cracking of the PDMS surface following removal of the chromium/gold (10 nm/100 nm) layer – 100 μm × 500 μm lines.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4594096&req=5

f6: Effect of mask aspect ratio on the mud-crack patterning.(a) chromium/gold (5 nm/100nm) – 100 × 500 μm2 rectangle. (b) chromium/gold (5 nm/100nm) – 150 μm × 1000 μm lines. (c,d) chromium/gold (10 nm/100nm) – 100 × 500 μm2 rectangle. (e) chromium lines (150 μm × 1000 μm) following the removal of the 100 nm gold layer and (f) 3D image of cracking of the PDMS surface following removal of the chromium/gold (10 nm/100 nm) layer – 100 μm × 500 μm lines.
Mentions: Let us now focus on metallized rectangles and lines, i.e. when the mask width is lower than Lc while the mask length is significantly longer. Figure 6 shows the resulting cracking of the metallized PDMS surfaces in the case of metallization of rectangles (100 × 500 μm2) and lines (150 μm by 1 mm). Two different thickness of chromium are used: 5 nm (Fig. 6a,b) and 10 nm (Fig. 6c–f). The gold has been removed (see Methods) in Fig. 6e to reveal the chromium and the chromium/gold has been removed (see Methods) in Fig. 6f to reveal the PDMS topography.

Bottom Line: The density of the mud-crack patterns depends on the plasma dose and on the metal thickness.The mud-crack patterning can be controlled depending on the thickness and shape of the metallization - ultimately leading to regularly spaced cracks and/or metal mesa structures.Such patterning of the cracks indicates a level of self-organization in the structuring and layout of the features - arrived at simply by imposing metallization boundaries in proximity to each other, separated by a distance of the order of the critical dimension of the pattern size apparent in the large surface mud-crack patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut d'Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), CNRS UMR8520, The University of Lille, Cité Scientifique, Avenue Poincaré, 59652 Villeneuve d'Ascq, France.

ABSTRACT
Exploiting pattern formation - such as that observed in nature - in the context of micro/nanotechnology could have great benefits if coupled with the traditional top-down lithographic approach. Here, we demonstrate an original and simple method to produce unique, localized and controllable self-organised patterns on elastomeric films. A thin, brittle silica-like crust is formed on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using oxygen plasma. This crust is subsequently cracked via the deposition of a thin metal film - having residual tensile stress. The density of the mud-crack patterns depends on the plasma dose and on the metal thickness. The mud-crack patterning can be controlled depending on the thickness and shape of the metallization - ultimately leading to regularly spaced cracks and/or metal mesa structures. Such patterning of the cracks indicates a level of self-organization in the structuring and layout of the features - arrived at simply by imposing metallization boundaries in proximity to each other, separated by a distance of the order of the critical dimension of the pattern size apparent in the large surface mud-crack patterns.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus