Limits...
Processes of Removing Zinc from Water using Zero-Valent Iron.

Suponik T, Winiarski A, Szade J - Water Air Soil Pollut (2015)

Bottom Line: The BET surface area, the pH at point of zero charge (pHPZC), the ORP of the solutions, and the pH and chemical concentrations in the solutions have also been measured.Furthermore, the paper also considers the possibility of release of zinc from the precipitates to demineralised water in changing physicochemical and chemical conditions.In neutral and alkaline conditions, the adsorption occurred as an additional process.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Silesian University of Technology, Akademicka 2, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Zero-valent iron has received considerable attention for its potential application in the removal of heavy metals from water. This paper considers the possibility of removal of zinc ions from water by causing precipitates to form on the surface of iron. The chemical states and the atomic concentrations of solids which have formed on the surface of zero-valent iron as well as the type of the deposited polycrystalline substances have been analyzed with the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The BET surface area, the pH at point of zero charge (pHPZC), the ORP of the solutions, and the pH and chemical concentrations in the solutions have also been measured. Furthermore, the paper also considers the possibility of release of zinc from the precipitates to demineralised water in changing physicochemical and chemical conditions. In a wide range of pH values, Zn x Fe3 - x O4 (where x ≤ 1) was the main compound resulting from the removal of zinc in ionic form from water. In neutral and alkaline conditions, the adsorption occurred as an additional process.

No MeSH data available.


XPS graphs of the iron samples: a after the first batch tests for the initial pH of the solution amounting to 4.5, 7.0, and 9.5 and b after the second batch tests for the initial pH of the solution amounting to 4.5, 7.0, and 9.5
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4594089&req=5

Fig2: XPS graphs of the iron samples: a after the first batch tests for the initial pH of the solution amounting to 4.5, 7.0, and 9.5 and b after the second batch tests for the initial pH of the solution amounting to 4.5, 7.0, and 9.5

Mentions: Table 2 presents the atomic concentrations of the elements on the iron samples before the study and after the first and second batch tests. Each assessed sample contained carbon and oxygen. It is possible that the oxygen was contained in precipitates in the form of metal oxides and metal hydroxides, while carbon and oxygen in compounds in which the following bonds occur (in very small quantities): -C-O- and -C=O (binding energy: C1s = from 286.51 to 288.64 eV, see Fig. 2). The main contribution to the C1s line is constituted by hydrocarbons deposited on the surface. This always occurs when a sample is stored in atmospheric conditions. The binding energy of the C1s line resulting from the presence of hydrocarbons amounts to 285.0 eV.Table 2


Processes of Removing Zinc from Water using Zero-Valent Iron.

Suponik T, Winiarski A, Szade J - Water Air Soil Pollut (2015)

XPS graphs of the iron samples: a after the first batch tests for the initial pH of the solution amounting to 4.5, 7.0, and 9.5 and b after the second batch tests for the initial pH of the solution amounting to 4.5, 7.0, and 9.5
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4594089&req=5

Fig2: XPS graphs of the iron samples: a after the first batch tests for the initial pH of the solution amounting to 4.5, 7.0, and 9.5 and b after the second batch tests for the initial pH of the solution amounting to 4.5, 7.0, and 9.5
Mentions: Table 2 presents the atomic concentrations of the elements on the iron samples before the study and after the first and second batch tests. Each assessed sample contained carbon and oxygen. It is possible that the oxygen was contained in precipitates in the form of metal oxides and metal hydroxides, while carbon and oxygen in compounds in which the following bonds occur (in very small quantities): -C-O- and -C=O (binding energy: C1s = from 286.51 to 288.64 eV, see Fig. 2). The main contribution to the C1s line is constituted by hydrocarbons deposited on the surface. This always occurs when a sample is stored in atmospheric conditions. The binding energy of the C1s line resulting from the presence of hydrocarbons amounts to 285.0 eV.Table 2

Bottom Line: The BET surface area, the pH at point of zero charge (pHPZC), the ORP of the solutions, and the pH and chemical concentrations in the solutions have also been measured.Furthermore, the paper also considers the possibility of release of zinc from the precipitates to demineralised water in changing physicochemical and chemical conditions.In neutral and alkaline conditions, the adsorption occurred as an additional process.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Silesian University of Technology, Akademicka 2, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland.

ABSTRACT

Zero-valent iron has received considerable attention for its potential application in the removal of heavy metals from water. This paper considers the possibility of removal of zinc ions from water by causing precipitates to form on the surface of iron. The chemical states and the atomic concentrations of solids which have formed on the surface of zero-valent iron as well as the type of the deposited polycrystalline substances have been analyzed with the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The BET surface area, the pH at point of zero charge (pHPZC), the ORP of the solutions, and the pH and chemical concentrations in the solutions have also been measured. Furthermore, the paper also considers the possibility of release of zinc from the precipitates to demineralised water in changing physicochemical and chemical conditions. In a wide range of pH values, Zn x Fe3 - x O4 (where x ≤ 1) was the main compound resulting from the removal of zinc in ionic form from water. In neutral and alkaline conditions, the adsorption occurred as an additional process.

No MeSH data available.