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Collagen peptide supplementation in combination with resistance training improves body composition and increases muscle strength in elderly sarcopenic men: a randomised controlled trial.

Zdzieblik D, Oesser S, Baumstark MW, Gollhofer A, König D - Br. J. Nutr. (2015)

Bottom Line: Following the training programme, all the subjects showed significantly higher (P<0·01) levels for FFM, BM, IQS and SMC with significantly lower (P<0·01) levels for FM.The effect was significantly more pronounced in subjects receiving collagen peptides: FFM (TG +4·2 (sd 2·31) kg/PG +2·9 (sd 1·84) kg; P<0·05); IQS (TG +16·5 (sd 12·9) Nm/PG +7·3 (sd 13·2) Nm; P<0·05); and FM (TG -5·4 (sd 3·17) kg/PG -3·5 (sd 2·16) kg; P<0·05).Our data demonstrate that compared with placebo, collagen peptide supplementation in combination with resistance training further improved body composition by increasing FFM, muscle strength and the loss in FM.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1Department for Nutrition,Institute for Sports and Sports Science,University of Freiburg,Freiburg 79117,Germany.

ABSTRACT
Protein supplementation in combination with resistance training may increase muscle mass and muscle strength in elderly subjects. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of post-exercise protein supplementation with collagen peptides v. placebo on muscle mass and muscle function following resistance training in elderly subjects with sarcopenia. A total of fifty-three male subjects (72·2 (sd 4·68) years) with sarcopenia (class I or II) completed this randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study. All the participants underwent a 12-week guided resistance training programme (three sessions per week) and were supplemented with either collagen peptides (treatment group (TG)) (15 g/d) or silica as placebo (placebo group (PG)). Fat-free mass (FFM), fat mass (FM) and bone mass (BM) were measured before and after the intervention using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Isokinetic quadriceps strength (IQS) of the right leg was determined and sensory motor control (SMC) was investigated by a standardised one-leg stabilisation test. Following the training programme, all the subjects showed significantly higher (P<0·01) levels for FFM, BM, IQS and SMC with significantly lower (P<0·01) levels for FM. The effect was significantly more pronounced in subjects receiving collagen peptides: FFM (TG +4·2 (sd 2·31) kg/PG +2·9 (sd 1·84) kg; P<0·05); IQS (TG +16·5 (sd 12·9) Nm/PG +7·3 (sd 13·2) Nm; P<0·05); and FM (TG -5·4 (sd 3·17) kg/PG -3·5 (sd 2·16) kg; P<0·05). Our data demonstrate that compared with placebo, collagen peptide supplementation in combination with resistance training further improved body composition by increasing FFM, muscle strength and the loss in FM.

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Correlation (Pearson’s r) between fat-free mass and fat mass changes after a 12 weeks of resistance training in elderly men (age>65 years, n 26) in combination with a daily dosage of 15 g collagen peptides (r 0·72; P<0·001).
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fig3: Correlation (Pearson’s r) between fat-free mass and fat mass changes after a 12 weeks of resistance training in elderly men (age>65 years, n 26) in combination with a daily dosage of 15 g collagen peptides (r 0·72; P<0·001).

Mentions: Fig. 2 demonstrates that the observed increase in FFM of 2·90 (sem 1·84) kg in the PG was more pronounced after supplementation with 15 g collagen peptides (+4·22 (sem 2·31) kg). The observed group difference was statistically significant (P<0·05). In addition, the decrease in FM in the collagen peptide-supplemented group (–5·45 (sem 3·17) kg) was more pronounced (P<0·05) compared with the PG (–3·51 (sem 2·16) kg). Although the difference was not significant, baseline characteristics showed that subjects in the PG weighed less and had relatively more FFM and less FM compared with subjects in the collagen-supplemented group. In both the groups, the loss of FM correlated with an increase in FFM; in the collagen-supplemented group, the correlation coefficient (r 0·72; P<0·001) was more pronounced than in the control group (r 0·55; P<0·003) (Figs 3 and 4).Fig. 2


Collagen peptide supplementation in combination with resistance training improves body composition and increases muscle strength in elderly sarcopenic men: a randomised controlled trial.

Zdzieblik D, Oesser S, Baumstark MW, Gollhofer A, König D - Br. J. Nutr. (2015)

Correlation (Pearson’s r) between fat-free mass and fat mass changes after a 12 weeks of resistance training in elderly men (age>65 years, n 26) in combination with a daily dosage of 15 g collagen peptides (r 0·72; P<0·001).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4594048&req=5

fig3: Correlation (Pearson’s r) between fat-free mass and fat mass changes after a 12 weeks of resistance training in elderly men (age>65 years, n 26) in combination with a daily dosage of 15 g collagen peptides (r 0·72; P<0·001).
Mentions: Fig. 2 demonstrates that the observed increase in FFM of 2·90 (sem 1·84) kg in the PG was more pronounced after supplementation with 15 g collagen peptides (+4·22 (sem 2·31) kg). The observed group difference was statistically significant (P<0·05). In addition, the decrease in FM in the collagen peptide-supplemented group (–5·45 (sem 3·17) kg) was more pronounced (P<0·05) compared with the PG (–3·51 (sem 2·16) kg). Although the difference was not significant, baseline characteristics showed that subjects in the PG weighed less and had relatively more FFM and less FM compared with subjects in the collagen-supplemented group. In both the groups, the loss of FM correlated with an increase in FFM; in the collagen-supplemented group, the correlation coefficient (r 0·72; P<0·001) was more pronounced than in the control group (r 0·55; P<0·003) (Figs 3 and 4).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Following the training programme, all the subjects showed significantly higher (P<0·01) levels for FFM, BM, IQS and SMC with significantly lower (P<0·01) levels for FM.The effect was significantly more pronounced in subjects receiving collagen peptides: FFM (TG +4·2 (sd 2·31) kg/PG +2·9 (sd 1·84) kg; P<0·05); IQS (TG +16·5 (sd 12·9) Nm/PG +7·3 (sd 13·2) Nm; P<0·05); and FM (TG -5·4 (sd 3·17) kg/PG -3·5 (sd 2·16) kg; P<0·05).Our data demonstrate that compared with placebo, collagen peptide supplementation in combination with resistance training further improved body composition by increasing FFM, muscle strength and the loss in FM.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1Department for Nutrition,Institute for Sports and Sports Science,University of Freiburg,Freiburg 79117,Germany.

ABSTRACT
Protein supplementation in combination with resistance training may increase muscle mass and muscle strength in elderly subjects. The objective of this study was to assess the influence of post-exercise protein supplementation with collagen peptides v. placebo on muscle mass and muscle function following resistance training in elderly subjects with sarcopenia. A total of fifty-three male subjects (72·2 (sd 4·68) years) with sarcopenia (class I or II) completed this randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study. All the participants underwent a 12-week guided resistance training programme (three sessions per week) and were supplemented with either collagen peptides (treatment group (TG)) (15 g/d) or silica as placebo (placebo group (PG)). Fat-free mass (FFM), fat mass (FM) and bone mass (BM) were measured before and after the intervention using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Isokinetic quadriceps strength (IQS) of the right leg was determined and sensory motor control (SMC) was investigated by a standardised one-leg stabilisation test. Following the training programme, all the subjects showed significantly higher (P<0·01) levels for FFM, BM, IQS and SMC with significantly lower (P<0·01) levels for FM. The effect was significantly more pronounced in subjects receiving collagen peptides: FFM (TG +4·2 (sd 2·31) kg/PG +2·9 (sd 1·84) kg; P<0·05); IQS (TG +16·5 (sd 12·9) Nm/PG +7·3 (sd 13·2) Nm; P<0·05); and FM (TG -5·4 (sd 3·17) kg/PG -3·5 (sd 2·16) kg; P<0·05). Our data demonstrate that compared with placebo, collagen peptide supplementation in combination with resistance training further improved body composition by increasing FFM, muscle strength and the loss in FM.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus